Hardware

Let Task Hammer turn completing tasks into an RPG

Jack Wallen takes a look at Task Hammer, a fun productivity app that combines to-do lists with RPGs.

It's not often I get to cover something that injects a bit of silly fun into the world of IT. But when I came across the app Task Hammer, I couldn't resist. Task Hammer combines two things admins need and love: To-do lists and RPGs. With this fun little app, you set yourself up as a fantasy character and then use that character to complete real-world tasks. As you complete your real-world tasks, your characters attributes raise -- just like a standard AD&D (or other RPG) game. It's a fun way to crush your to-do list and make you remember to actually keep track of those to-do list items!

Task Hammer offers the following features:

  • Alarms for tasks
  • Built-in widget
  • Repeating tasks
  • Choose from one of three (as of this writing) characters
  • Advance your character's stats by completing tasks
  • Set specific attributes (strength, vitality, intelligence, perseverance, charisma) to a task
  • Set task importance (highest, high, medium, low)
  • Task deadlines
  • Include task notes

Task Hammer is easy and fun to use. Let's dig into its installation, the set up of your character, and start hammering some tasks.

Installation

Follow these steps to install Task Hammer:

  1. Open the Google Play Store
  2. Search for "task hammer" (no quotes)
  3. Tap on the entry for the Task Hammer app
  4. Tap Install
  5. Tap Accept & download

After you complete the installation, you'll find the Task Hammer launcher in the app drawer. Tap that launcher to open the app for first time usage.

Creating your character

When you open the app, you can choose from the three character types (Barbarian, Rogue, Sorceress), or you can be a mystery character if you like. You can also give your character a name.

To create the character, do the following:

  1. From the main window (Figure A), tap the Character icon
  2. Tap the Edit button in the top right corner of the Character window
  3. Give the character a name
  4. Slide the pictures to the right or left to select a type of character
  5. Tap the Save button
Figure A

Task Hammer as seen on a Verizon-branded Samsung Galaxy Tab.

Now that you've created a character to slaughter your tasks, it's time to list the actual tasks to conquer. This step is simple. Here's how:

  1. From the main window, tap Tasks
  2. Tap the plus sign [+] in the upper right corner
  3. Fill out the information for the task (Figure B)
Figure B

Don't forget to tap Attribute and associate the task with how you want your character to "level up."
When you complete a task, tap the checkbox to the left of the task name. When you do this, the trumpets will sound, and you'll be awarded experience points (Figure C), which will accumulate to help level up your character. Figure C

The higher you level up, the more experience points are needed.

Settings

There are a scant few settings you can manage within Task Hammer. When you tap Settings on the main window, you can configure the following (Figure D):
  • Sound effects on/off
  • Reminder sound
  • Reminder vibration on/off
  • Skip menu (have the settings menu open when app opens)
  • Back up character (to SD card)
  • Restore character (from SD card)
Figure D

You can change the reminder sound to one from your SD card or internal memory.

Task Hammer will not help configure your servers, automate any of your processes, or turn you into the worlds greatest IT administrator. What it will do is make the task of to-do lists a bit more enjoyable. At least for me, it's actually helped me to stick with using a to-do list so that I'm better able to organize my life. Give Task Hammer a try and see if a little RPG-like action doesn't spice up your to-do lists.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

2 comments
janakee
janakee

The only RPG that I know of was a programming language that I used in the 70's. If you use a term like this please always make sure it is defined.Report Program Generator.

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