Tablets

Three reasons why Microsoft will never regain tablet dominance

Patrick Gray explains why he thinks Microsoft will never regain dominance of the tablet market. Do you agree?

Almost daily, a technology company CEO takes to the stage trumpeting the wonders of tablet computing, their newest slate-style device in hand, and superlative-laced talk of the amazing and innovative technology housed inside. While this is now old hat, one technology company beat them to the party by nearly a decade.

In November of 2001, Bill Gates took the wraps off the first iteration of the company's Tablet PC operating system, and showing himself to be either a prescient futurist or the world's worst marketer (depending on your interpretation), predicted that Microsoft's Tablet PCs would be the most popular PC form factor within five years. Fast-forward to late 2011, and Gates' latter prediction seems about right, with tablet-format computers flying off the shelves as stalwarts like HP leave the PC business for dead.

Obviously, Gates prediction about what software would be running on those devices was horribly wrong, the shiny silver Apple logo having kicked Windows to the curb to such an extent that your average technology buyer isn't even aware that Microsoft has had a tablet offering for the better part of a decade. I can only imagine the stares of disbelief in Redmond as they watch Apple gobble up the spoils in a market segment they pioneered, all in a matter of months rather than the years Microsoft put into the platform.

So, the question is: Will Microsoft ever regain a foothold in the tablet space? Despite being a big fan of Microsoft's products, I see the answer as a resounding "no" if Microsoft continues on its current track. Here are three reasons why.

1. Vertical markets

Take a peek at Microsoft's literature advertising its Tablet platform, and you'll surely see mention of terms like vertical markets, manageability, and other meaningless corporate-speak. Based on the resulting sales, as best as I can tell, these translate to "designed by committee" to appeal to a market of about a dozen.

If you look at the disjointed approach to hardware, software, and marketing that Microsoft has taken with the Tablet PC, it's clear that there's no compelling vision behind it. Apple shows you how you can make a movie of your Little League game on the iPad and send it to grandma, while Microsoft places ads in the tech rags that feature painfully staged photos of "generic professionals" and talk of "feature porn" rather than what you might actually do with the thing.

Apple's liberation under Steve Jobs came from the company designing a product Mr. Jobs wanted to use, and the cohesiveness of visions shows through from execution to marketing. While Mr. Gates had clear passion about the Tablet when it came out, the haphazard execution resulted in disjointed products that check most of the "features requested" boxes put forth by hundreds of focus groups rather than forming a compelling finished product that anyone in a real market actually wants to use.

2. Do as we do, not as we say

Those elusive vertical markets keep telling Microsoft they want to run regular Windows applications on their tablets, and I've also been guilty of that same assumption. Conceptually, it would be great to have a device with an iPad form factor that I could connect a keyboard to and work on like a regular laptop, while also maintaining iPad simplicity and speed. Unfortunately, this takes you into a world of compromises. I loved some of Microsoft's Tablet features, like the handwriting recognition and "paper notebook on a dump truck full of steroids" power of OneNote, but the compromises were too great. In a critical client meeting, I couldn't wait two minutes to boot up my note-taking device or worry that my battery would die in that 2:00 PM meeting.

I replaced my old Tablet PC with an iPad with a great deal of trepidation, and while that device is also not without a raft of compromises, its core seems to have been designed with usability as the first priority. I know almost without fail that I can get into my note-taking application in about six seconds and that there will be plenty of battery -- simple but critical features that make or break a highly personal device like a tablet.

In addition, there aren't constant updates, mysterious hangs, or crashes. Sure, IT can't manage my iPad to the extent they might desire, but they also can't load it up with crap to the point that it takes 12 minutes to boot to ensure appropriate "manageability." Despite the cerebral arguments in favor of an IT-centric approach, running "heavy" applications, and universal compatibility, usability is ruling the day in this form factor.

3. The end of the enterprise

Microsoft is beholden to "enterprise users," the mammoth corporations that can generate millions in revenue with the stroke of a pen. I'm sure it's much nicer to cash one huge check than a bunch of smaller ones, but I believe a focus on the enterprise is actually holding Microsoft back.

If you look at all the recent big technical innovations, most are targeted squarely at consumers, save perhaps for virtualization. The technological "cool stuff" that used to happen in the server room is now happening at your local electronics store, and this boat is sailing without Microsoft on the tablet front. Technology has become so personal that even the staid ranks of the Fortune 500 are allowing employees to bring their own devices into the enterprise -- a trend that is only likely to accelerate as the newest members of the workforce see their laptop and tablet as just as personal a choice as what shoes to wear to the office.

Similarly, iPads are cheap compared to "enterprise" tablets, and in some ways, they're more user friendly and effectively "disposable" than a tablet that must be managed, secured, updated, and maintained. $400 looks like a bargain for field service or marketing, especially when you consider training and deployment costs.

The pressure on Microsoft's Tablet-related divisions must be immense, as expectations for the next iteration have gone beyond "grand slam" to the equivalent of a sweep of the World Series. It's perhaps too easy to armchair quarterback Microsoft's failings to win much traction with its Tablet PC, and hindsight always offers a clarity that's unavailable in the heat of battle. So, in my next post, I'll offer some brief points as to what I would do if I were running Microsoft's tablet show.

About

Patrick Gray works for a global Fortune 500 consulting and IT services company and is the author of Breakthrough IT: Supercharging Organizational Value through Technology as well as the companion e-book The Breakthrough CIO's Companion. He has spent ...

56 comments
alfielee
alfielee

Not even a mention of Android which has passed Apple in numbers of sales per month. As far as Microsoft is concerned & the things you can do with it, well for the most part everything you do with MS I can do with Linux & it still costs me nothing...

michaellashinsky
michaellashinsky

They never had it. Windows tablets were just laptops with a gimmick. (Large, heavy, stylus instead of a mouse,...) The ipad defines the tablet now, and MS hasn't even gotten into it yet.

Christopher.cobb
Christopher.cobb

With a touch screen laptop (a.k.a. tablet PC) that has decent ram/cpu and ssd AND windows 8 I have something Apple has yet to sell. A very usable PC with a decent touch screen interface that can do ipod like apps and run my "legacy apps/corp apps". I LOVE my ipad, I enjoy my Air with OSx, but there are things I can do with one I can not do with the other. Windows 8 should allow me to do BOTH. And as hardware gets better/cheaper/faster, I can look forward to even better solutions. It would not take much for Apple to create a "all in one" touch screen 24" lcd based computer, add the touch screen drives and a IOS interpretor so you could run your ios apps on it. Add a touch screen to the air and the same software and that would be an awsome combo as well.

Ternarybit
Ternarybit

The realities of the consumer market is that it's tremendously fickle. Consumers are like goldfish who will eat until they nearly kill themselves, then look for something else. Microsoft has to win the enterprise at most once a decade and they have a model that helps businesses succeed. With SharePoint, Office, and the plethora of other technologies they provide, no one can compete with their understanding of what business needs (provided they fire ballmer before he undermines that). What compelling reason do they have with incredible, better than ever profits to pursue a market that's likely not long away from imploding on Apple's head when their "make the screen bigger" model of innovation runs out of inches? In my opinion, Jobs bailed while the getting was good, leaving the bag in the hands of Apple's own Steve Ballmer (Tim Cook) who will treat the entirety of the business as the supply chain and inevitably crash them again arguing over the cost of 5 grains of silicon.

monyogo
monyogo

All microsoft needs to do is change their vision on tablet PC as a whole. Microsoft needs to understand the market driving tablet PC in order to understand how it should develope its tablet OS. Tablet PC has moved from the mostly business class to mainstream. And no one discovered and understood that faster than steve jobs. tablet PC changed dramatically form being a portable gadjet for the business traveler to mainstream toy for the young and tech fascinated age. So its system upgraded to supports speed, high graphic properties, easy to use, icon oriented, futuristic fantasy dispalys, fluid navigation and beautiful design. Microsoft needs to separate its tablet PC and phone systems away from the windows effect. Technically microsoft is way beyond, but they have to mix their technology with design, beauty and simplicity. In simple terms they need a Giogio amani or Versache in their design team.

dcristof
dcristof

Hmmm, either you pay no attention to what MSFT has been doing or you are hopelessly biased. I own an iPad 2 and bought it day one, and it sits aside my MBP 15 and my iPhone 4. So I am not an Apple hater or a MSFT fanboi. Reason 1: It wants to compare Windows XP tablet edition and Tablet PCs to the iPad. >Even MSFT knows these are not valid comparisons, which is why they are going all in on the Metro UI. Windows 8 will be a game changer in so many ways, and we are only looking at pre-beta software in its first generation. Reason 2: It fails to understand "enterprise" needs. >If you a business person, you need business-quality apps. You can get away with Mac OS X if you are a journalist or an artist in many forms, but if you need to do real work with Excel, Outlook, or a myriad of other applications, Mac OS has not nearly enough. The only reason why the enterprise is looking at iPad is because there is nothing else yet. Once they get Win 8 on ARM, things will change in a hurry. Reason 3: Consumers work in the Enterprise. >MSFT knows that consumers work on the enterprise, and as much as the tablets are popular with a particular group of consumers, well over 85% of the computer using world knows Windows. Walk away from that group at your own peril. Microsoft is faced with a challenging paradox; they have to innovate while still insuring the "computer lite" population is comfortable with those innovations. The answer? Create a brilliant new UI from scratch and enable a crossover point from Windows, create one code base to address both tablet and computer by limiting what code loads in each environment, embrace standards so your app dev environment is familiar and easy to use and allow the enterprise to have all of your experience with security and reuse of legacy code. Not bad. You may still be right, but not for the reasons you cite.

AlaskaHome1959.mailinglists
AlaskaHome1959.mailinglists

I was going to say exactly the same thing Von Schnitzel posted. The use of the phrase "regain tablet dominance" is a deliberate obfuscation designed to imply that Microsoft ever had dominance, which was never the case. Sure, they talked a lot about tablets, but most of what comes out of MS is either FUD or fantasy, and their talk of tablets fell into both categories.

don
don

Yes, it does take about a minute to boot Windows, but it takes just as long to boot iOS on my iPad 2. The difference is that we rarely reboot iOS. The same can be said for my Windows laptop. I set my power management to suspend when I close the lid. I can resume in a few seconds. I can honestly say I only reboot Windows about 1-2 times a month. When Windows 8 comes out on hardware that is compariable to the iPad or Android tablets, Apple will lose a lot of market share unless they change a few things. If Apple changes these things, they can retain their lead. 1. Before I can eliminate my laptop, my iPad would need to be able to PRINT to most printers. This is one example of why the iPad is a very good device, but NOT a laptop replacement. Until they can do things like printing, they will always be a supplement, not a replacement. 2. I need to have a decent version of Office. I've tried the Apple applications, Desktop to Go, QuickOffice and a few others and none of them can replace Microsoft Office. 3. I need better monitor support. When working on my laptop I extend my desktop to an external monitor. In fact, to be really productive, I would need to be able to have multiple windows on the screen at the same time. Of course if iOS displayed multiple windows it would probably be a slow as Windows 7 on a five year old laptop. I cannot tell the future, but as has always been true in technology, dominating the market today is no indication of future success. Just look at IBM, RIM, Compaq, etc.

puritianb
puritianb

The new andriod bionic can ran applications on your home computer from anywhere in the world. It can then send the results via email and you can print out from any computer with a printer.

rengek
rengek

I'll file this article under the same slew of articles that I read about 3.5 years ago where the writers were equally adamant that android phones can never overtake iphones and the reasons why.....not to mention all the "its too late" comments at the time....In the world of business and tech its never too late.

ralphdb
ralphdb

Smart Phones, Tablets, Laptops and desktops running win 8 shall rule. I have been running the Developer Demo on my desktop for a week and I am impressed ! My Next stop is a Win8 Os equipped smart Phone. I think Microsoft is looking at the big Picture.. (NO I don't work for them) Apple will drop behind until it copies what Microsoft is doing.. Just my Opinion. It's like you and your neighbor buy identical cars. He nitpicks his to death (Bet he would do the same with any Car) You drive your car and enjoy it for 10 years..and never understand what his problem Is... as he trades the car in every year.

AudeKhatru
AudeKhatru

First, I have a problem with the title of this article. While MS did dominate the tablet market, that market was so small that it never really deserved that title, so it is hard to say that they can or cannot regain something that did not exist. Second, all three points are based on existing versions of Windows, which aren't perfect on tablets, and BIOS. UEFI and even Windows 7 have speeded up boot time tremendously. "In a critical client meeting, I couldn???t wait two minutes to boot up my note-taking device..." How about 25 seconds? The Asus Eee Pad 12" Tablet boots in 25 seconds. Battery life may still be a problem. A friend bought one, and I was amazed. Heck, even my old Samsung Q1U with Windows 7 on boots in just under a minute. Definitely not instant-on, but lets not over exagerate the problem. I am amazed that people can use an iPad to take notes on. I know I couldn't, but then I am a big guy, and my hands don't work well with small keyboards. Even the one on the Asus Transformer is too small for me. The points in the article are all correct for tablets with Windows 7, but we haven't seen enough of Windows 8 to know what will happen there. ARM processors should fix the boot time and battery life problems. Lastly, the enterprise issue you discuss will always be a problem. Anything that connects directly into the corporate network needs to be secure. (full stop) I think Windows 8 will change the game, but I do not think it will be an iPad killer. Apple is too good at appealing to the individual consumer, but I think that Windows 8 tablets will have a stronger appeal for IT. When the bigwigs want a tablet, and IT can offer them something secure, then you have an enterprise winner. Right now, that solution does not exist, and the bigwigs often overrule IT. By the way, I work for a state agency, and our bigwigs are elected officials. They don't take kindly to being told no, and they tend to get what they want. We have iPads creeping in, and iPhones replacing some of our Blackberrys because that is what they want to use. There is no really good alternative at the moment. A Windows 8 tablet might give us (the IT dept.) the leverage to fight back. We will have to wait and see.

vivek.sheel
vivek.sheel

If author thinks that reason IT market exist is just because people are buying system as they dont have to learn it anymore fails to realize now people are more tech savvy than earlier and knows more stuff without even trying to learn, IPad is really nice device and yeah to many it qualities are good as well but i guess we also realize the very fact IPad has no real capabilties and Ipad is far too limited in the approach. Where are Windows 8 based tablet will have mush more uses than Ipad will ever come near too. IT Market came into existance because of people desire to learn more and use more of these IT products, Sure Iphone is really cool, Ipod touch is really nice, and Ipad is awesome but limited boundries in them will be the very reason Microsoft will be able to find its market, Not many apple fan boys in this world and Metro interface will be good change in pace. All I will say is "Don't write Microsoft off just yet".

sms21
sms21

But Windows 8 could steal a good portion of market share if MS used a Windows Phone 8 stripped down image that might just be the ticket for MS. I have seen Windows Phone 7 and it is a smooth OS with lots of cool features and very configurable. Obviously not IOS but very cool. MS just needs to retool Zune Marketplace coupled with a powerful tablet, and a streamlined Windows Phone 8 tablet image.

coyzan
coyzan

Unless Windows 8 gets given away FREE with loads of user-friendly apps on a tablet with a battery life of a week , and half the price of the iPad, I absolutely cannot see Microsoft competing, let alone winning this war. Remember the Zune? Neither do I.

Soloet
Soloet

I don't think they even need windows 8 because they are already getting quite a chunk from android sales. As they are currently feeding of android sales from Motorola, Acer, HTC and many more; like a parasite so obviously they do not care if it fails or suceeds. So I will never ever, at all adobt it, use it or even care about it.

peterpk85
peterpk85

But i can see few apps brings MS apps to my tablets. Take AccessReflex, it brings my desktop MS Access to smartphones.

AtlantaTerry
AtlantaTerry

Short of keyboards and mice, Microsoft does not actually manufacture hardware, their hardware partners (OEMs) do. Terry Thomas President PC Tech Atlanta

pmshah
pmshah

I still have an old time fully functional B/W Hand Held PC sporting WinCE. . This was very similar to the conventional laptop. only 2/3 wide and maybe 1/2 as deep. The only problem was the processing power (by today's standard), weight and battery life. With today's hardware I am pretty sure all those problems would automatically be solved. M$ just has to be smart and give a c**p for the end users.

Gisabun
Gisabun

Only 3 reasons? Not 10? Then Windows on a tablet can't be all that bad. Positive siude for having Windows on a tablet? * compatibility - not to have Windows on one system and Android on another * easier syncing [both being Windows] * easier configuration [sharing printers, etc.] * using the same OS throughout * same look an d feel [maybe with somew exceptions]

adornoe
adornoe

The "re-innovation" that has occurred in the last year or so, is, of course, still very new, and Microsoft, like many others, was caught napping. Google tried to "catch up" with Android tablets, but even they have stumbled. But, the "redefinition" of the tablet marketplace is still very new, and Microsoft and others are in the planning and development stages, and with Windows 8 coming along, the iPad and the Google Android tablets manufacturers will have to start looking over their shoulder at what Microsoft may be unleashing in about a year. The tablet market is far from settled, even if Apple has a good lead. So, the predictions about Microsoft, or even any other player in the market not being in it or not having a chance to catch up or to take the lead, are very premature. A blog such as the one above is best after the competition has had a chance to release and start playing in the same environment. Furthermore, tablets, like desktops and laptops and netbooks before them, will also have newer generations where the OSes and hardware will get updated/upgraded, which means that, people who look for new or replacement tablets, will be examining their options when looking to update or upgrade. Like with PCs, people will be switching to whatever is the newest, or coolest, or better or fastest or most feature rich, or has a good combination of many factors. In other words, as long as there is competition, there is no settled and sure winner in the tablet arena.

alfielee
alfielee

Hesitancy in forging ahead has always been the conservative manner but eventually they move across as they see others surviving doing it differently. MS is dead & even staid corps have made the change...

alfielee
alfielee

You can do it especially if you get Google to come over & help you...

alfielee
alfielee

Large corporations may believe they require these things but even there many have jumped ship to online clouds which Google do better than anyone. Argue that one but be ready to give some pretty good indications as to why I'm wrong. Windows efforts in the cloud are a joke as are Apple's. This is where Yahoo might have some power if they ever get recognised again. MS is screwed...

alfielee
alfielee

Palm was the leader in early days & their lead was taken for a very short term by RIM. MS never had it happening. It was always fantasy...

alfielee
alfielee

Apple is already trumped by Android due to the price & variability. Also freedom is a reason many won't do Apple. Closed shop sends many running & they don't even have to be techheads to want to avoid that but this is another tangent. Windows however has already lost...

spdragoo
spdragoo

I see a lot of search results when I look up "access files on pc from android". But when I look up "access applications on pc from android", I get either the same results (i.e. getting the *data* files from my PC) or results for Android's Market... which is for apps for *Android*. Which is fine...as long as, say, you can pull up your MS Office files from home, have an app on your Android Bionic that can a) read the data and b) *edit* the data, make any editing changes you need, then save the changes in a format your home PC can read. I'm not 100% convinced that's there yet. And the Droid Bionic commercials I'm seeing on TV are trumpeting "synching your data wirelessly", not "run your PC programs wirelessly".

alfielee
alfielee

I thought Palm had the major serve in the early days...

ScarF
ScarF

I couldn't wait two minutes to boot up my note-taking device... Indeed, AudeKhatru. I also noticed this unbelievable reason, and I can recommend to the author a device which boots in less than one second: a notebook and pen or pencil. It is also waaaaaay cheaper than his beloved tablet for taking notes. And more efficient. Ah. Unless one only wants to show what "cool" stuff he may extract from his suitcase, which is all together a different facet of the problem. But, what if the client is like me and - far from being what-so-ever impressed by an Apple tablet - is actually disgusted by all the circus around them? Eh?

spdragoo
spdragoo

I work at a state agency as well. Hardware is mandated by the IT department, which means I work with Windows machines. My wife teaches at the local college, & their IT department purchases Windows machines for the student labs & for the faculty to use in their offices. And I use a Windows machine at home. For me, then, were I to look for a tablet PC, a Windows-based tablet *automatically* has a higher appeal for me than an iPad-X or Android-Y, because any potential data syncing will be much easier, not to mention the programm/app choices available will be more consistent.

SKDTech
SKDTech

Of course I do, and I think you do too or you would not have brought it up. It is a superior device to the iPod in my opinion, the software works better than iTunes and with ZunePass you can listen to and download anything in the Zune marketplace. Microsoft's biggest problem is marketing. The only thing I can recall that they have properly marketed this decade is the XBox and XBox 360. When they put their mind to it they do very well.

steve jack
steve jack

This app works great for me. Not i always connected to my MS Access anywhere anytime

FTAdmin
FTAdmin

This may be a big reason why MS has yet to create a solid portable device. They need to take a page from Apple's book and specify exactly what hardware goes with their software, so as to keep it all more tightly knit and therefore efficient. Even if they don't literally make the hardware in their plants, they need to at least say, "Do it this way, with this specific hardware." I think that part of Windows' performance issues and instabilities is that it tries to cooperate with way too many OEM's hardware specs... specs which may not precisely agree on the same thing (such as resource usage), even on the same piece of hardware. Nail down exactly how the hardware is to run, and you can then nail down exactly how the software is to control and interface. Of course the above rant only covers device performance. There are many other things to consider on how to make a "good" portable device. Human interaction is another major thing to consider, but I'll leave that for a different post.

reggaethecat
reggaethecat

And people DON'T WANT WINDOWS ON THEIR TABLETS, they have suffered enough having it on their PCs.

reggaethecat
reggaethecat

By the time Windows 8 comes out (early 2012, does anyone actually believe that?) with its much-vaunted Metro tablet mode the iPad 3 will probably be out and already more advanced. Apple are releasing new versions of the iPhone and iPad about every 12 to 18 months where it takes MS 3 to 5 years to get a new release out, and they are now merely copying what Apple do. Add to this the fact that consumers love the Apple brand and don't care about MS, MS have utterly failed on Windows Phone, and I can't see a way that MS can possibly catch up in the tablet/phone space.

alswharton
alswharton

It amazes me how many people jump to bandwagon conclusions so fast. Months ago they said Google+ would "kill facebook". At one point, people said Verizon offering iPhones would kill Android phones. The reality is, the market is VERY fast moving and people's needs change. At one point several years ago, Apple was "king of the world", then it disappeared for several years. Digitial Equipment Corp was cutting edge. HP was a peer of IBM. THINGS CHANGE!!!

alfielee
alfielee

One is running Windows on a PC, the other is running Android on a tablet or phone. The 2 are not compatible & you cannot run the PC program on Android. You may have an Android version of that program & it will hopefully do the same things but they are not the same...

Slayer_
Slayer_

Even though a good chunk of those 360's turned out to be defective, they got out the door first, and game developers jumped on board to cash in on the new higher graphics with the typical cookie cutter games like sports and shooters.

spdragoo
spdragoo

My wife is considering getting a mobile PC to use for work (faculty at local college). Because the college PCs use Windows, the *only* tablet she'll consider is one that runs Windows apps... more specifically, one that will run apps that will at least interface with the college PCs, if not allow native transfer of data (i.e. the tablet will run MS Office applications). That means she absolutely, 100% won't consider any Android or iOS-based tablets.

adornoe
adornoe

with battery usage and with resource consumption. Windows 8 promises to solve the issues. If it comes even close to the promises, then you'll see a full-featured OS in tablets, and the personal and business sector, will make that full-featured tablet a big winner. Then, the only question, when it comes to the choices for tablets will be: do people want a crippled OS or a full-featured tablet that can perform as well as a full-featured laptop with a full-featured OS?

adornoe
adornoe

and the iPad3, just like it's ancestors, will be just a couple or 3 minor upgrades from the one before. Windows8 is just the OS, and when it comes to the hardware, the competition to the hardware in the iPads is already there, and in a few cases, already superior to what the iPad1 and iPad2 offer. What might be missing is a good OS which will take them over the top and above the iPads, even the new iPad3 or iPad4 or iPad5. The iPads, as long as they continue with the crippled OS and crippled hardware feature-set, will not even be in the same ballpark as Windows8 tablets, where just the OS will be a lot more powerful than iOS. There are many millions of people holding off on their purchases of tablets, because, for the money, they just aren't powerful enough. Next year, whoever comes up with a fully capable tablet, and for a reasonable price, will begin to take over the market. It could be Android-based tablets, or it could be Windows8-based tablets, or something that we still haven't heard about, but, the iPads will become just another tablet in the playing field.

g01d4
g01d4

Apple and Steve Jobs were always better with the consumer than Microsoft. The small devices (iThing) market was created by the consumer as opposed to business. Microsoft was built on the business desk/laptop computer market, after IBM dropped the ball, and leveraged this position as these devices flowed into the consumer or home market. Microsoft's success in the iThing market depends on whether there's any real, or better unique business application for these devices.

KBabcock75
KBabcock75

Sounds an awful lot like the pad MS has been trying to sell for the past 10 years and failed at miserably. What you ask for has been out there a long time, the market has proven this is not what people want, no arguing it. Apple figured out what people want in a Pad and provided it to great success. The smart players took Apples idea and built competing systems. These systems are selling despite teething issues and in the future will be major competitors. Unless MS starts to get what people want in a Pad rather then tiring to force another Windows bloat ware, they will be adopted by some techs and niche markets but will face the same future as the Zune.

adornoe
adornoe

Windows 8 won't be one full-blown OS that will be fitted to all computing form-factors or to all mobile platforms (tablets & smartphones). Windows 8, from the specs that have been coming out, will be just the right size for each platform, and what goes into a smartphone might be "smaller" than what goes into a tablet, and those will in in turn be smaller than what is intended for full-blown, feature-rich, desktops and laptops. Windows 8 will provide compatibility between the different form factors, and a lot of sameness in the GUIs, but, it won't be "one size fits all", like it sounds is your complaint.

reggaethecat
reggaethecat

I honestly think that is the big downfall of Windows. We haven't seen how Windows 8 will run on a tablet yet, but I don't see it being lightweight enough in terms of memory, CPU and power to run on current tablet technology. I can't believe that MS are still trying to shoehorn the full version of Windows onto tablets, they should have a cut-down version and a full version or disaster awaits. It seems to me that the way they are going they will have people running Windows 8 on laptops/desktops/VDI who will never use the Metro UI (why would you want to?), and people trying to run Metro on tablets/phones who won't be able to because hardware constraints mean the base OS will be slow. Both sets of users will be failed.

spdragoo
spdragoo

My cellphone is *not* a smartphone. It cannot access the Internet, cannot IM any of my friends, or access any smartphone apps. It *can*, however, do exactly what I want it to do... allow me to send SMS text messages to people, & make/receive telephone calls. By *my* personal standard of use, it works *wonderfully*. From the perspective of someone wanting a smartphone experience... it's woefully crippled. Are there tasks that you *cannot* do on your iPhone or iPad, that you're able to do on your Windows desktops -- or, as a better comparison, on a similar Mac? Yes, otherwise you'd use your smartphone instead of your Windows desktops. iOS is "crippled" when it comes to providing a *full* PC experience...but it works wonderfully *for you* (& other smartphone users) within its niche (i.e. smartphone-style usage).

mongocrush
mongocrush

Are you paid by Microsoft to say these things, because I've seen you comment more then a few times about how apple has a crippled O/S. How can you compare Windows 8 to an Ipad when Windows 8 hasn't even been released yet? I have the Apple Iphone and Ipad2 and they are far from being crippled, they do exactly what I want them to do. I have a few Windows desktops and they do exactly what I want them to do as well.