IT Employment

4 ways that my job rocks: A positive spin on IT

Layoffs, a down economy, stress... is there a bright side to your job? Staying positive can be harder than ever. Scott Lowe helps the process by focusing on the good aspects of IT at Westminster.

Everywhere you turn these days, you see negativity. From economic conditions resulting in mass layoffs to those same mass layoffs creating additional stress for the survivors to tales of horrible bosses, it can be hard to keep a positive outlook on work. Considering the fact that most of us spend at least a third of our day in the workplace, it's really a shame that so much attention is devoted to a mindset that doesn't accentuate the positive aspects of work life. With this constant barrage of negativity coming from any corner and a never-ending stream of work, how do IT leaders stay positive and motivated? What aspects of the job make you get up every day and go to the office?

In this column, I'll tell you about the positive aspects of my job as CIO at Westminster College. In the comment section, describe what you like about what you do.

Note: Before I begin, I will preface this list by telling you that I'm focusing on the good here. Like every job, mine has its ups and downs and there are parts of my job that I'd gladly hand off to someone else, but the good far outweighs the bad.

  • Flexibility. I can safely say that I have an extremely flexible job in which I'm able to better achieve some semblance of a work/life balance. Sure, I work a whole lot of hours, but it's much easier to accept longer hours when I can come in at 10AM after spending the morning having a long breakfast with my four-year-old daughter. If I need a day off or want to leave early, there's never a fuss. This kind of flexibility is something that I pass on to my staff as well. As a team, everyone works very hard to meet our department's goals. This commitment includes long hours and, sometimes, sacrifice. Besides, this flexibility is a two-street. It's difficult for me to tell someone that they have to work late with one hand, and with the other, tell them that they can't take a bit of extra time in the morning. Obviously, flexibility is easier with salaried employees that understand that functions still need to be staffed during our normal working hours. Everyone works together to make sure key operations are staffed.
  • Variety. No one can claim that the world of IT is boring! The kind of variety that I see is one of the main reasons that I stay in IT. I get bored easily, so a constantly changing landscape is a perfect backdrop for my career. Beyond the constant change in IT, I manage to get involved in a whole lot of operational items at Westminster.
  • Development. Personal and professional growth is important to everyone. I'm fortunate to work in an environment that encourages and nurtures growth. People are frequently promoted from within; there is broad representation from many levels on committees, including our strategic planning committee and a lot more. My boss, the president, also encourages - to a point - our individual outside activities. I tend, for example, to do a lot of writing for TechRepublic. This activity is encouraged and well-supported.
  • Opportunity. If I can dream it, I can do it. Working at a college affords my staff and I the opportunity to try out a wide variety of solutions and technologies. The sky is the limit... budget and time permitting, of course. After all, college IT isn't that different than business world IT. IT is involved in every aspect of the College's operation and we're spearheading a number of process improvement efforts and data initiatives designed to reduce expenses and aid in better decision-making. This kind of involvement means that we're constantly learning how other areas of the College function. Even better, we get deeply involved in the mechanics in order to get an understanding of ways that we can make things better.

In short, I get up in the morning generally looking forward to going to work. Is my situation unique? I hope not. But with the constant barrage of negativity, it's important to step back and look at the positive side of what we do as well. As IT leaders, we're all under intense performance pressure, have more requests than we can handle and work very hard, but when it comes down to it, things might be pretty good.

About

Since 1994, Scott Lowe has been providing technology solutions to a variety of organizations. After spending 10 years in multiple CIO roles, Scott is now an independent consultant, blogger, author, owner of The 1610 Group, and a Senior IT Executive w...

101 comments
NickNielsen
NickNielsen

=> Flexibility. Within reason, as long as I get the required hours in each day, I can start and finish when I wish. I'm not salaried, so I can't just take a day off, but I can flex a day here and there if I make up the hours somewhere else in the week. => Variety. The calls may repeat themselves, but the days never do. I may joke about there being six days in the work week (Monday, Monday, Monday, Monday, Monday morning, & Friday afternoon), but I never have the same day twice. Never. => Development. While I don't always have the free time I'd like, I manage to learn something new every day. => Opportunity. I don't have the same kinds of opportunities you get, but in my territory, I not only perform service, I also get to do project work on occasion. Plus, I have become the "consulting" tech on several pieces of client equipment, to the extent that I have been asked to provide training on that equipment. Do I love my work? Oh, yes I do! (The job, on the other hand... ;) )

jkameleon
jkameleon

I've just checked your background: CIO in Westminster college. And a thought occured to me. There is still one ol' nasty economic bubble that has yet to burst: A student loan bubble. And, there is still one segment of IT workforce that has yet to suffer: A Power Point brigade. Colleges, and other institutions of learning, who peddle degrees, which offer no chance of paying back student loans. Your employers. Is this the reason why are you trying so hard to put on the show of being positive? If this is the case- please, be a man, and go under without dragging others with you.

maclovin
maclovin

Love the people I work with, to be honest! I tend to get negative really easily. I guess it's all those multi-colored flags around me people keep using!

mwesthoff
mwesthoff

Variety and flexibility are key for me, too, and many of my employees. I have found, however, that a few of my employees like the exact same routine every day. I've also found ways to maximize their strengths, so they are happy being a virtual "highway striper" and my other folks are happy doing new and different things.

KaryDavis
KaryDavis

...and I drive 39 miles one way, five days a week to do my job. I didn't discover the IT field until late in life, when a 3.1 Windows computer was set on my desk at one of the jobs I disliked most. Up until that time I had been a paralegal, lost my position due to outsourcing and was working as an Admin Assistant in a mortgage department. Ironically, the AA position was one I detested and hated coming to work. But it gave me a whole new direction with the arrival of that first computer. I love working with and helping others. Tech support is perfect for me. I enjoy my users and they enjoy me as well. I'm very positive in my outlook which makes my job even more enjoyable (JMHO) Since I also support the IT Department, I get to learn and try new things. I'm always a second set of hands for a developer or network admin on bigger projects. My CIO is very progressive and so is the company, so we usually get to try and test the latest and greatest. We are testing and planning deployment of Windows 7 and I'm getting to help out with the project. I love the hardware aspect of my job. I get to troubleshoot PC componets, either fix them myself or through an active warranty. I also get to dispose of obsolete and retired equipment, which allows me to fix up and dontate old computers or send them for recycling. I have my off days same as everyone else, but like Scott, the positive things in my job far outweigh the negative... I'd like to add that I wasn't always a positive person. This is a choice I made as being negative all the time made me miserable. I spent time with a positive person and decided I wanted to feel better about things, so I was able over time to see the better side of life. Negativity is a choice...and I no longer choose to be negative.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I have to laugh at all the nattering nabobs of negativism (the guy who coined that phrase William Safire just passed). Scott has a good job and enjoys it, so naturally those who don't have to tear him down to make themselves feel better. Hutus and Tutsis? Give me a freakin break, to compare IT to genocide thats way way way over the top, and it just shatters any kind of credibility you might have to use such hyperbolic language. maclovin, can't you somehow get your mind around the fact that many if not all manager were once not managers and did the kinds of jobs you do. I'm a manager, and I still get to do some of those kinds of tasks. I don't complain cause variety can make the day more enjoyable. If people don't like where they are, get off their butt and start looking for something better. I have done it many times in my career. James

mario.vasquez
mario.vasquez

How about we ask some one who is at the bottom rung of the ladder at your place? I am salaried, work a regular 40 hour week which easily turns into 45-50 if you count working through lunch or staying late. Plus any changes have to be made after hours so I am always doing late nights,weekends or early mornings and NEVER get the opportunity to come in later or leave early in exchange. A giant company with a tine network group means i am on call every other week and need to monitor EVERY email or alert that comes in 24/7 while on call incase it is a warehouse or international location. That means regular nights slept on the couch so my Blackberry doesn't wake up my wife when it goes off 10x a night. And no, finding a new job is not an option. The market is horrible and the jobs are few. Life balance? I love watching my children being raised by daycare workers. 2 weeks vacation? Almost all used up by school days off. Oh, but i get well rewarded right? Nope. My pay is $10-15K below what it should be. And we went without raises this year because of the "economic situation". 15 years in IT and I am ready to leave as soon as i find something. Unless you're a coddled programmer or a manager, I would tell a young person mever to enter IT.

Scott Lowe
Scott Lowe

I'm relatively certain that we'll be able to adjust to changing conditions and stay around for a long time. We have a very good team of people leading the charge. Not sure how being positive is so negative ("dragging others with me"), but to each his own! Best of luck, Scott

JamesRL
JamesRL

I'm sure Scott can answer for himself, you seem a little obssessed with this. In case you don't understand how it works here, its usually not colleges who provide student loans. Banks provide a student loan, and students pay colleges with cheques, that have to clear or the student will be kicked out. I don't see who he is dragging under. You may not have the same perspective as he does, but funny, you don't work at the same place, so how would you know? Perhaps he is positive because he choses to be. Perhaps thats a good thing. Perhaps his staff prefer working with a positive person than a mean grumpy boss. Perhaps you should stop raining on others parades and work a bit to fix your own situation. James

jck
jck

I'm the same, in that I enjoy who I work with (except for one person, who is obnoxious in many ways). My boss is great, the other programmers are great, IT tech people great, etc. It's the idiots who think that you can fit any square block through any round hole as long as you pound it enough. Humanity requires flexibility. Business and its models expect lemmings. You're "unprofessional" or "immature" if you complain. You're "incapable" if you can't do something which your expertise says you can't, but business goals say you must. It's just sickening. Crap rolls downhill, but I'm waiting for the day I get a pump truck, stick a hose in the septic field, and fire a little back up at the folks above me that fed so much of it to those they considered wrongly not to be doing their work right.

Scott Lowe
Scott Lowe

I couldn't agree with you more and have seen some of the same traits in some of my folks. Playing to their strengths keeps everyone happy.

Scott Lowe
Scott Lowe

James Twice in my career I've gotten to the point at which I couldn't stand going to work anymore and found myself in a terrible mindset. The underlying problems were organizational, not the position itself, so there was no fixing it. Upon this realization - both times - I ended up moving on to new (and, incidentally, better paying) positions and was much happier and more productive. It's what got me to Westminster in the job that I truly wanted, too. Obviously, no job is perfect so you have to find and focus on the bright spots. Life's too short!!! Scott

maclovin
maclovin

Believe me, I really do try to be positive!

jck
jck

But, he sugar-coats some of it. Loving your job is one thing, but being realistic is another. As for Hutis and Tutsis...I just ignored that. Of course if comparing genocide to IT is wrong, then how would you rate the way the business establishment treats its IT people? e.g.- quite often, people in call centers make much much less than secretaries. They both field calls. They both schedule appointments. They both track critical data on something. So why have call center jobs been moved into cube farms and paid $7.50-10 an hour and often no benefits, while secretarial work gets $24k a year and up with some benefits? Hence, IT really do get treated just like cattle unless they have "moved up the ladder" or "acquired formal schooling". I do have to say though: This describes all my managers I have ever worked for. Before the company owner/head CNE was a tech person, he was an accountant. No tech experience. 3rd worst boss I ever had. She had been a programmer, and was sharp. She was a great boss. He was a business major and had done early jobs in hands-on skilled labor. He was a good boss because he let me run/manage my computer section, and asked me what he needed to know about what we were doing. She was a great boss. Had been a programmer for 15 years before taking the dept. manager job. She was the best multitasking, problem resolving person I've ever worked for. She would always say "Saying who is to blame doesn't get us a solution. We need to look at what doesn't work and get it fixed." then tackle the issue later and find a best practice to get from that. Boss was horrible. Business head. Tried to program, but often blew up modules we had to fix. Other bosses (who organized projects) lost 3 accounts during my time with them because they couldn't understand a) what the tech was we dealt with, and b) that part of managing a contract is making sure your customer is still okay with the terms and ensuring you don't lose it. Worst boss I ever had. People called him the anti-christ. Typical, arrogant, corporate management type. Had been a head manager at Microsoft. Thought that made him tech God. The guy never put a virus checker or firewall on an open wireless highspeed data link. I hope he gets fired if he's still in IT. His type is the kind that makes IT unbearable and gives us a bad name. Another management type. Business major who went in as an analyst, then a project manager, then became dept manager. Nice guy, understood a bit, and was flexible as his boss would let him be. I would have loved to keep working for him, and with the staff he had. Super guy. Former military tech person. One of the nicest people I've ever met. Always worked to make people happy. Always tried to find the best solution for everyone. He is the best boss I've ever had. Nice guy. Knew some tech and had certs, but would use his "manager" designation to "defer work" or "delegate" jobs to others when he didn't know how to do it. I feel bad for him. After I left that job, he was pushed out. The boss was incredibly knowledgable and great at tech stuff. However, he had no management skill. You getting things done in a brand new technology that he had helped beta test for and no books were published on, he would expect you to be as fluent with the tool as he was. Set unreasonable deadlines, etc. He was someone who should have stayed a programmer/analyst and banged out work like a madman and got paid top dollar for it. I left that job specifically because of him, his attitude, and his unreasonable expectations. This one used to work in skilled trades too. I guess he kinda stumbled into tech and did some, but then got into management which suits him well. He's a good boss and a super nice guy. He gives me tasks, lets me do them, lets me know if there's a crunch, etc. Doesn't stick his head in the tech barrel and lets his people do their job. If the people above this guy took his approach to management, I'd never thought of leaving that job. Anyways. I'd say half or more of my bosses didn't go straight into and make a career of it. And most of those were bad managers. If a boss isn't like you or my current boss, James, then they really can't or have a hard time relating to what happens and how things get done effectively in a tech environment. maclovin may have been a bit overboard. But, IT isn't a bright sunshiny happy-go-lucky place either. Fun, happy places to work in IT are often rare, and most often it is not at all the fault of the IT staff but because of upper management or an "accepted" or "standard" practice. When business realizes that IT is a totally different beast than accounting and other typical business departments, they might begin to understand that making the collar tighter on the dog might not make him respond better.

Ed Woychowsky
Ed Woychowsky

Some people aren't happy unless they're complaining.

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

"nattering nabobs of negativism" Love it. Firstly, because I tend to focus on the positive (anyone whose had a rough life would tell you that most corporate-world jobs at their worst are absolute cakewalks relatively speaking). Secondly, because alliteration is my favorite literary device! :) I'm with you; if you're not in the situation you want to be in, do something about it.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

I'm a service tech, not a CIO. Or couldn't you figure out how to respond to Scott?

jkameleon
jkameleon

Study, a college degree requires significant amount of effort and money. I guess I'm not exaggerating if I call it the single most important investment one makes in his life. Yet, unlike stock market, the college degree market seems to be pretty unregulated, and fraud rampant. Conning people into buying worthless stocks by giving them false information about them is a criminal offense. On the other hand, it's perfectly legal to con people into getting a college degree, which doesn't pay even their student loan. False information is in this case positive spin about certain profession, and/or talent shortage propaganda. I think that if laws, which regulate investmets on stock market, applied to college degree market as well, people like you could end up in jail.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I've been laid off. Doesn't feel good. I've seen others devote a lifetime to a company they love only to find the company go under through no fault of their own. But even if the worst happens, and your employer goes under, it still pays to keep a positive attitude. Thats why most counsellors will tell you to take a week or two to get over your job loss and work out your issues before you look forward and find another job. In the end, if you have done a good job, have good references, and keep optimistic, you will succeed. Too many times I've heard job applicants who are still negative about their previous employer in interviews, and its rare that they get hired. James

jkameleon
jkameleon

Harris Miller, among many others of his kind. I'm generally kinda allergic to spin and spin doctors. Say... for charitable reasons. BTW: I love my bosses grumpy. Grumpiness is a sign of wisdom, maturity and realism.

Scott Lowe
Scott Lowe

I did, in fact, reply to that post as well. I normally ignore those kinds of comments, except when they're that... interesting. And, you're spot on with regard to the so-called student loan "bubble". I think Westminster will be just fine. We've had to make adjustments over the past couple of year due to changes in markets, budgets and the economy and we'll continue to make the changes necessary to stay in business for the long haul. I AM choosing to be positive here, too. I can be mean and grumpy, but try my best to keep things from that end of the spectrum. If I was constantly negative, I'd hate to see what kind of team I'd have! Thank you for your comments, by the way. Scott

JamesRL
JamesRL

I don't see the jobs in his org going to Rwanda. Outsourcing in my global Fortune 500 company is being reversed. James

jck
jck

I'll leave the field, or go into management. :^0

maclovin
maclovin

I will admit, I get that way easily. Probably all the people asking me verbally for help while I'm in the middle of something else. Then complaining about me forgetting about it later, when a simple e-mail could have solved the entire "connection-issue" between myself and the user. Plus, what's more, even when you try to explain to non-IT types what you're talking about, they don't what to hear it, or it's too complicated. So, they simply say, "can you simply explain what's going on here?" But, when you do try to simplify things, then people think you're talking down to them. It's a double-edged sword. Believe me, I WISH it was a single edged...KATANA! JK!!! :D All kidding aside, I can only simplify "monitor' and "hard drive" so much. It's not like when a child learns to say the word "airplane" (as was my first word), they first have to learn words like "cigar, shaped, object, wings, fly, air, etc...." Simply put, that's what it's called, deal with it! You don't know what it is? Okay, why don't you use all that time you spend browsing the internet on company time getting to know a few new words???

jck
jck

and I don't like your tone. :^0 :p

jkameleon
jkameleon

... I still prefer my bosses grumpy. It's more sincere, more natural. Management by perkele is the best!

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

is a sign of self-absorption to the degree of not giving a fig about the others with which one has to deal. No wisdom or maturity there.

jkameleon
jkameleon

Is not about feelings, but basic economics, supply and demand. People do things they love to do for free, for hobby. There is a huge supply of such labor, and little demand, which means little or no pay. On the other hand, there is a huge demand for work that sucks, for things people generally don't want to do, and/or aren't able to do. Consequently, such work is generally paid better. Making IT professionals motivated and happy about their work is therefore an assault my wallet, we all earn less on that account. And that pisses me off. I hate my work, which is normal, but I love my paycheck, which is even more normal. I'm miserable as hell, my heart bleeds if it's not as high as it could possibly be.

JamesRL
JamesRL

If you wanna be miserable and quiet fine. Just don't attack others for being happy. You don't the right to cr@p on others, then be protected from the backwash. I've had more exposure to outsourcing than you think. I'm not from the US, so not as familiar with the US names, but I'm well aware of the process, having done extensive analysis on outsourcing and its impacts for more than one of my previous employers. You don't seem to mind insulting Scott. I don't think I'm attacking you so much as defending Scott's viewpoint. You, or anyone else, can chose to be happy, or they can work to be in a place that makes themselves happy, its really not that difficult a concept. James

jkameleon
jkameleon

Try adding "programmer shortage" "critical programmer shortage" and "propaganda" to your query. And stop with that psycho shit of yours, it's insulting. Whether I'm miserable or not is none of your fucking business.

JamesRL
JamesRL

Does Scott anywhere in his piece endorse outsourcing? If so I didn't see it. Is he optimistic? Sure he is. But thats not spin, thats who he is. I've just been through a very rough patch work wise. Our customers are going out of business. We've had big layoffs, both in staff and management. We have to do more with less. But how does being miserable help that? Last time I checked, you live in a free country. If you don't like where you work, find another job. It may not be easy, but it may be worthwhile. Not all employers are the same. James

jkameleon
jkameleon

You had to reply, I was questioning your motives. Nasty, I admit it, but guess what- spin is usually nasty as well.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I've been two major unrelated companies where they have quoted a study on the employee-customer profit chain at Sears, which is one of the many studies that link employee satisfaction, customer satisfaction, customer retention and profit. Satisfied employees make an effort to make customers satusfied. Satisfied customers continue to do business, and that increases profits, as less money needs to be spent on attracting new customers. James

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

don't understand the importance of customer satisfaction or employee satisfaction because they can't be quantified as part of the bottom line. Many aren't capable of such understanding, even when the bottom line is no more.

jck
jck

Yeah, you manage hardware tasks which aren't always remoteable. I can see where you have to be on-site. That kinda sucks for you. But then again, it makes you more valuable in a way: keep non-remote hardware in place and outsourcing you is zero opportunity.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I also manage people. That young team of developers I have, needs my face time. That plus the fact in the same time I have responsibilities for security and the data center....I'm not getting out of here soon. Now the full time PMs, they work from home. We don't use video conferencing cameras, we do use LiveMeeting for remote presentations. We also use instant messaging software, so we can reach out. James

jck
jck

You could handle all your tasks electronically. Where you have to meet with vendors and clients is different for hands-on. But, communications can be done with one or more peers via email, voice mail, phone, teleconference, etc. And, you can web conference cheap too as well (GoToMeeting, etc). Plus if you're managing projects, your people working from home are already putting in versions and what not into a system or giving you updates periodically. You can keep up-to-date on all of that remotely, generate the reports, and email them to the appropriate people to be included in compilations for management meetings. It's honestly so easy. I am shocked at this point more corporations haven't sent people in India to get a MBA, send them back to India, and setup management farms to handle project management for them to save $1Ms on budget. Of course, probably the same reason that you had for moving work back to North America: quality sucked. But, you could manage from home. Maybe not 5 days a week. But, you could do it. It's really easy, unless you're in a public role...

JamesRL
JamesRL

If I could move an hour away, work from home, cut my mortgage substantially, eliminate the thousands of kms of commuting, not to mention the close to two stressful hours a day, would I take a 5% pay cut? In a New York minute. I might end up making slightly less money even after the reductions in costs, but the time saved and reduction in stress would be worth it to me. Would my company go for it? Not in my job class. As I said before, some of my staff do work at home, they didn't take a cut though. We have lots of people work from home, in many tasks. We recently moved two offices into one, and gave a bunch of people the chance to work from home. Most took the opportunity. Their employee satisfaction scores will improve too. James

jck
jck

Move to a cheaper area and take a 5% pay cut. Tell the company it's your contribution to efficiency and urge others to do the same. Then work from home in your PJs. :^0

jkameleon
jkameleon

Moving to lower cost areas, just like you've said. It's not a fad, but bottom line issue. Projects, that are easy to specify, hard core, high skilled technical jobs go first. OS porting, hardware design, communication equipment development, device driver development, embedded programming, things like that. Jobs, that are culture specific, like call centers, marketing, development of applications with lot of UI, and changing requirements are much harder to offshore, but eventually, they go as well.

JamesRL
JamesRL

What I've seen is that the trend to outsource everything that can be outsourced has failed. Many companies that experimented with large scale outsourcing have reduced or eliminated their outsourcing workforces. I'm not suggesting that all outsourcing is dead, but it isn't the latest fad. The trend my company is following is moving call centres to lower cost areas of the US and Canada, where wages, real estate and taxes are less than some of the big cities. James

jck
jck

When I got hurt a while back, I was working from home. My weekly hours: 52 on average Now I'm back in the office. My weekly hours: 41 on average You'd think they'd realize I was putting in 500 more hours a year for them doing that. 25% in hours work would have to count for something, don't you think? Oh well. That's life, right?

jck
jck

glad yours is not singly motivated with pecuniary interests only. BTW to all those Trek lovers out there: Why do I feel like screaming this right now: "DARMOK...AND JILAD...AT TENAGRA!!!!!!" :^0

santeewelding
santeewelding

Than your own assessment: you equated capitalism to business; business to " 'who cares who else is hurt' attitude"; in contrast to positive business by which the "who" is helped, not hurt. At your convenience. Today I must come here, then go, in order to run a helpful business.

JamesRL
JamesRL

to work at home, and some who aren't. I have one development team thats small, young and need to learn and cooperate with each other. It makes sense to have them work in the same office. I have others who are more individual contributors, and they work from home. We don't allow people to use their own PCs, for security reasons. We only allow company owned PCs with VPN software to access our corporate net. And we pay a good part of the high speed access. The company wins if productivity improves (and for the right people it does) and if they need less real estate. James

JamesRL
JamesRL

At the fortune 100 company I worked at, there were only two factors for most manager's bonuses; Customer satisfaction and employee satisfaction. It is cheaper and easier to retain the clients you have than to find new ones(there are always a few exceptional clients in this regard). That company BTW posted the customer and employee satifaction numbers by department. Publiclly. Everyone could see who was doing well and who wasn't. What a motivator for a manager. What people didn't see was the improvement targets. James

jkameleon
jkameleon

Well, OK, they probably won't be able to become CIOs right away, one needs some experience for that, but... it's just a question of time. The only thing that can possibly prevent that is leveling of Rwandan and American living standards. IT jobs always seek the places with lowest wages.

jck
jck

I have suggested being able to work from home, pointing out that I pay for the PC, the high speed line, the electricity, flexibility to work at 3am if I couldn't sleep (no cost since I'm salary), etc. I was still shot down. Go figure.

jck
jck

define that. hence, i may give you a competent answer within a reasonable timeframe. or not. it's your call.

jck
jck

becomes a revenue killer. Don't you agree?

santeewelding
santeewelding

I practice miniature capitalism at my finest, which you vilify. I go about business positively, with a positive attitude. Should I be squirming? Or, go negative and tell you to stuff it?

JamesRL
JamesRL

We pulled out, not because of increasing costs, but because of customer satisfaction, or lack thereof. They just were not happy with the service levels they received, despite the staff in India receiving the same training as the staff in North America (same courses and same trainers). So instead my company has been building call centres in lower cost regions of the US and closing out expensive real estate in major centres. There have been a fair number of people decide to work from home as well. James

jck
jck

In the 1990s, it was going to Mexico with NAFTA. Then when that got too expensive, things came back here for a while. Then with the proliferation of IP telecommunications, corporates look to expose India, China, The Philippines, Malaysia, etc., for their cheap labor in call centers and help desks. Now that those countries are progressing and industries and business have built there, cost of living increased, more people have better education, etc., cost of labor has relatively soared and they are pulling back out. As soon as business finds another cash cow to exploit, they will. That's capitalism at its finest: it's the "who cares who else is hurt" attitude. If it's not illegal and increases profits, that's all that matters to them in the end.

jck
jck

"working for more innovation" competition. :)

jkameleon
jkameleon

IT is "working for less" competition. :p

jck
jck

let them program for less...for me as manager. And if I go into another occupation, it will be one that they can't outsource to another country. :) See...I win :)

jkameleon
jkameleon

It's about working for less!

KaryDavis
KaryDavis

..in your direction Ed. Feel better soon!! :)

jck
jck

I know how you feel tho. When I got hurt, it felt like someone scratched my back...with a sledgehammer. :^0

Ed Woychowsky
Ed Woychowsky

I just had my tonsils removed and I'm a little cranky. Feels like I gargled with a hedgehog.

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