Networking

Boneheaded mistakes... we all make them! Share yours.

We all make mistakes. It's been written the the person who never makes a mistake never really works, either. I thought I'd share a couple of mistakes I've made in the past with you. Share your own! This is intended to be a lighthearted discussion.

First this:  "Ok... I'm ready... now, just press the Enter key and I'll be done."

Followed by this: "Uh, oh." or "Oops." or maybe something a little more colorful.

It's happened to all of us: That sinking feeling in the pit of your stomach when you do something boneheaded and the realization hits.  No matter how hard we try or how many safeguards are put into place, we're all human and mistakes will be made.  I thought I'd take a break from the mundane world for a bit and share with you two of my doozies.  Now, I'd prefer to be joined by some of you in this!  Share your own stories in the comment section.

And now, for the show:

  • Database disaster.  Early on in my IT career, I was one of two people -- the other person was my boss -- that managed a few dozen database application for a few K-12 school districts.  Each of the applications was linked to the primary student database.  For flexibility and ease of maintenance, we didn't physically copy the student database to the working directory for each application.  Instead, we created a symbolic link in the application's working directory; this symbolic link pointed to the main copy of the student database.  During the development of a new database application, I had to establish symbolic links to the main database.  Early in the process, I decided to move the new application to a different directory and I had to delete the newly created symbolic links.  Well, somehow, I managed to change to the directory that contained the primary copy of the student database before issuing a delete command.  Long story short, within seconds of hitting the enter key, the phones went berserk as I had deleted the database out from under about seventy applications.  I had the problem corrected within about an hour, but felt pretty small!
  • Network nuisance.  About ten years ago, I was the network manager for a small college in upstate New York.  At the time, the college was using a Fore Systems (now Marconi, I believe) PowerHub.  In order to add a network segment to a VLAN, there was a relatively convoluted command that had to be issued at the PowerHub's command line.  At one point, I needed to add a port on the PowerHub to the IT VLAN, which housed all of the College's servers.  Since the required command wasn't something I did very often, I consulted the PowerHub documentation, carefully followed the command syntax and made my configuration change.  Immediately, the workstation I was using stopped communicating on the network.  Realizing that something was amiss, I, quite literally, ran to a computer on a different VLAN and looked at the PowerHub configuration.  Upon looking at the IT VLAN details, I saw that the port membership of the IT VLAN included only the port I had intended to add to the VLAN.  All of the ports that were originally a part of the VLAN were missing.  I quickly recreated the IT VLAN to correct the problem.  Afterwards, I contacted Fore Systems and asked them about what I had done wrong.  Their response: "Oh... our documentation has a typo.  It happens all the time."

There are always lessons to be learned from mistakes and these two were no exception.  Obviously, I learned to check things more carefully before commiting an action.

Now, it's your turn!  Share some of your boneheaded mistakes below.

About

Since 1994, Scott Lowe has been providing technology solutions to a variety of organizations. After spending 10 years in multiple CIO roles, Scott is now an independent consultant, blogger, author, owner of The 1610 Group, and a Senior IT Executive w...

109 comments
wevers
wevers

Not going to believe this but just checking this post after 5 years (talk about email delay) and saw your post. Did we work at the same restaurant at the same time?

BigFrankinDallas
BigFrankinDallas

Back in about '83 when I first started - as a Jr. Programmer for an LA company, I was in charge of backups. Yeah - the grunt, newbie job. So I was working with mini computers (you younger guys may have to look that one up). Anyway, we had 75MB removable drives - three of them! HUGE amount of disk space. The platters were abut 15" diameter and fit in a unit about the size of a modern dishwasher. So my job was to remove disk 1 & 2, put in backup platter in 1... copy disk 0 to 1, then remove backup platter from 1, put LIVE disk 1 in drive 0, copy 0 to alternate backup 1 and so forth... well... yeah. I wasn't paying attention - probably the WORST thing an IT guys can do. And yes, I copied from 0 to 1 alright, but 1 was LIVE 1, not backup 1... It was a long night....

saghaulor
saghaulor

I'm a firm believer in the K.I.S.S. way of doing things, (keep it simple stupid). I remember one time I began gutting a pc to run a diagnostic tree on what I thought was a fried mother board. Obviously the power cord was not plugged into the power supply. Another one in the deleted non-backed up data vein. A friend of mine, who has similar tech experience as me comes over and asks me if he can use my pc to slave his drive, because he was screwing around with partitioning and now he can't boot his drive. Like the fool that I was, I let him have at it, and next thing I know my partitioning is screwed up and I've lost 2 nearly complete college term papers. Lastly, two overseas blunders. I remember calling ATT tech support to request instructions on how to bridge my modem to my router. I end up talking to a man from India who insists that my connectivity problem was rooted in electromagnetic interference despite my setup having worked flawlessly for several months prior. It turns out that when I power cycled the equipment it must not have been long enough because with one good long powercycle everything was running tip top. And finally, this was a few years back. Per the suggestion of my mentor, I was instructed to call Compaq and verify that the wireless card on a laptop was not a mobile broadband card. Being that it was a refurb laptop, and mobile broadband cards were relatively new, I was 99.999999% sure that it didn't have such technology. But given that my mentor though that it was a good idea to double check, I double checked. Once again I end up talking to an Indian man. After trying to explain to him what my question was, he tells me that the laptop doesn't even have a wireless card, let alone mobile broadband. Patiently trying to make sure that he is understanding me correctly, once again he confirms, there is no wireless capabilities on this laptop. At this point I am highly annoyed and offer to mail him the wireless components as I was physically looking at them so I was certain that the laptop had wireless capabilities, despite what his tech manuals stated.

kkorf
kkorf

When I made into the IT Dept for a major GIS company, I thought I knew it all, (you know how it is, when you are young). Well one day, I happened to be working on a computer, and noticed a cable not plugged into the wall. So being the helpful person I was, I plugged it in. Now no one noticed anything in that instant, but 5mins, later no one and I mean NO ONE could access resources or internet. People were rebooting their systems and then had no access to the network at all. The IT Manager at the time found a major loop in the network. He was out asking people what anyone might have done. We he got to me, at first I said I had not changed anything, not thinking what I had done would cause that problem. Then it hit me maybe I should tell him, just in case. It turns out cable was a cross-over cable already plugged into the wall. Well, I did and from that moment on, I was razzed anytime I was working with cables. It took me six months to live down.

jatwell
jatwell

Were in the midst of an office migration for one of our branch offices. We brought in new copper lines and had just got off the phone with the turnover folks for our provider. Lucky for us we had an old analog phone to test the lines with but we couldn't get any incoming calls. We get the lady from support back on the line and she calls in again. No ring. We go for the ultimate test, the outbound call. She's back on the phone and asks..."Is the ringer turned on for your phone?" DOHT!

reisen55
reisen55

This was not a mistake on my part but could have been horrible. I visited the data center on the 103rd floor one fine day and walked over to our 42U cabinet. Closed door, so I stood there and opened it properly. Nope, somebody just leaned the door against the cabinet. Ever pull a 42U door down on you. It is not pretty. I no longer worry about that data center. The 103rd floor is no longer there. Think about that a bit. It will come to you.

Tig2
Tig2

That you are still here to post about it. A friend's Aunt worked in Tower Two on the 86th floor. Fortunately she decided to go down for a smoke that morning. She had just exited the elevator on the ground floor when the plane struck. I'm grateful that she survived too.

reisen55
reisen55

Sometimes like at about 8:39 am on 9/11/01. Glad your Aunt is around too. In my travels, when I tell people I have experienced a server crash - I MEAN IT. I also participated in the recovery. Ever walk into a new office and see over 700 Dell systems piled up awaiting distribution from a shell shocked crew and to be given to an emotionally wrecked staff. We had our server power strips in the cabinets attached, believe it or not, down on the floor to a lousy little power strip. Easy to step on it...........

Wizard-09
Wizard-09

The building is no longer there, it was hit by a plane.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

It was demolished in a terrorist attack, the plane was just part of the outrage. To just say it was hit by a plane is to forget what actually happened.

cr7clark
cr7clark

As bad as some of these tales are, none of them involve life-threatening issues. I work in a pharmaceutical research laboratory and came across this story which gave me chills when I read it (the original article can be located on www.cdc.gov/eid; search for volume 12, no. 1, January 2006). A graduate student working on her thesis was at the lab bench toiling away on her research into different smallpox strains. One morning her left eye began itching, tearing and swelling so badly she had to see the student health nurse. The ordinary meds for conjunctivitis (pinkeye) were useless and by the fourth day the eye was quite red, swollen shut and very painful; she also came down with a fever and was bone-tired. A trip to her regular eye doctor got her packed off to a specialty eye treatment center where, guess what, she was diagnosed with SMALLPOX. For us older folks (born prior to the late 1960's) this would not be a problem, since we received a routine smallpox vaccination with the rest of our childhood immunizations. This individual was born after smallpox immunizations were discontinued (presumably because the virus had been exterminated by health officials) and could very well have died from the infection. Moral of the story -- the simplest and most routine of safety precautions can save our life! She was infected because she failed to (1) wear safety glasses and (2) avoid rubbing her eyes and face when wearing gloves.

kpierce0001
kpierce0001

I was on my first IT contract as part of a team going around esentially doing PC deployment (replacing computers, setting up routers, switches, etc.) for a bank. We drove around in a company van with all our equipment - thousands of dollars worth of computers, cables, etc. While we were in the branch, I was sent outside to get SATA cables, couldn't find them, went to tell my supervisor that we didn't have any, so he came outside with me to look for himself. As we were rounding the back of the van, I could see that the sliding van door was wide open. I had forgotten to close the door and lock it after I looked for the SATAs! Needless to say I think my face turned white, and he wasn't too happy. The door had only been open for a few minutes though. But anyone could've run off with lots of free computers!

neilb
neilb

Bored me when I read it. That's because I actually READ it. She WAS NOT diagnosed with Smallpox. "Sequencing showed that the infecting virus was a unique form of recombinant Western Reserve vaccinia constructed in the research laboratory and routinely used by the patient" The worker was researching [b]vaccinnia[/b] which is a pox virus that was the first [b]vaccine[/b] (get the link? vaccinia - vaccine) against Smallpox. OK, so it can cause infections and even kill but it isn't Smallpox. Whew! That was a close one.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

the play with the virus in the open air! Right then.

melissalcastle
melissalcastle

Of course there's the old deleting or updating records from a database and forgetting to include the WHERE clause...then frantically calling the DB admins to have the database restored.

douglasalt1
douglasalt1

We had received a brand new Siemens server (SCO-Unixware) to be used as the Finance and Housing Management application server. Shortly after the installation consultant had left, I had been looking at files that had been copied from the older production box and saw that some files could be deleted. This was at the beginning of the test phase of the migration of data, not, thankfully the production box. Hmmm, said I, lets get rid of them now. Without checking what directory I was really in (a simple pwd command would have told me) I typed rm* -f and pressed return. Events showed that I had been in the root directory, I started to worry when the console showed program files being deleted which became utter panic when the console showed devices being deleted or not found. The result of this was the callout of the consultant to re-install everything.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

and if I can't harness 1.21 Jigga Watts soon you will all find out just how!

mike
mike

I was once told that you never develop in production. This was my old boss telling me this. But I was assigned to build an HTML-DB application in Production. I asked for a development evnironment but was told that I would get one in about a month. A month came and went, no development environment. So fast forward 6 months. I'm coding like a happy camper when I decided to get rid of all test data and start testing with real data. But, I ended up deleting the entire production database. I think I felt my butt cheeks clinch in ways it was never clinched before. I got up from my desk and ran to the DBAs in the other side of the building. I asked the one DBA if they had a back up from the previous night and he said yes. I asked him how long it would take to restore and he said about an hour. So I walked back to my boss and told him what had happened. You know something, I got that development environment that day...

The Daily Llama
The Daily Llama

A friend of mine works for a large confectionary company in the UK. When a newbie starts in the company, they're given a guided tour of the building that they'll be working in, and sometimes one of the production facilities too. So they've got this newbie (NOT my friend, I hasten to add!), he's standing at the back of the group, a bit bored, not paying much attention to what's being said. The person giving the tour finishes their sentence with "... and don't ever press that red button". Our man looks up, points and asks "That red button?" "Yes", replies the guide. "You want me to push it?" asks our man, and promptly does so... shutting down the entire crisp manufacturing plant. It took 4-5 hours to clean all the ovens, empty the vats etc, reset all the machinery, and cost them over ?400,000. To this day, doing something like that at this company is named after the unfortunate lad (whose name I won't divulge!). All this on his second day at the company. Yes he's still there, he's got to pay off that ?400,000 somehow!

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Funny how things are remembered with such vivid detail when a 'friend' is involved.

RTHJr
RTHJr

I sure have made mistakes where most of the the time it was easier to just re-enter some data or run an incremental restore of just a few files/tables. But the most troublesome was stagging a new application server for production of an application in use and hosted by another machine for an interim period. I re-mapped a drive so that the application server would run its instance of the application off of its own hard drive locally rather than that remote host. I could see the correctly mapped drive in Windows Explorer just fine; but upon running a clean install of the application on the server locally, the setup routine found the old mapped drive setting still loaded in memory. Had I done a reboot, then I would have been OK; but the setup routine instead went and laid down a default set of report templates and lost all the customized reports. Many of the reports were old and the administration was being switched over in the next month but there still needed to be a few reports to close out operations for the year and there we had to scratch our heads on just how the customize reports were built to get by that month. When changing a mapped drive, reboot just to be safe.

williaa6
williaa6

Going back a long, long time, I was a senior operator on an insurance company mainframe. It was night shift and we were nearly finished. I was running the last job of the night when the system prompted me for a response. I quickly read the message and gave the go-ahead. Then we shut down and went home for a long weekend. Back on day shift I was asked by the Ops Supervisor if anything strange had happened on our shift. "No" I said, "Why?" It turns out that by giving the go-ahead, I had deleted the VTOC from the main string of DASD on the system, then packed up and went home. I was not popular. The lesson learned was "When you assume, you make an ASS out of U and ME". Check, check again, then get someone else to check as well.

agilebrainz
agilebrainz

Well, there was the time that some person from the maintenance dept modified a 110v style power strip to work on a 220v power source. I had been in the company maybe 6 weeks, had just finished rebuilding a blown drive on a laboratory pc. As I was explaining to the dept head that all I had left to do was plug it in and turn it on,.... Phhhzzttt!!

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

I was setting up a new building. With the pressure of purchasing of air handlers, racks, network equipment, fiber and countless other items...I thought my desktop guru could handle purchasing cabling and cable management for me so I gave him a list of items. All he had to do was purchase a few hundred pc's. No problem, they were basic office systems so he picked out one and had them all spec'd the same. He got all the ducks in a row for the cabling and mentioned he "color-coordinated" everything. I thought to myself, okay...odd, but okay. Gave everything a quick review (admittedly I only looked at equipment specs and contract terms) and gave the ok for the order. Once the cables arrived, to my horror his "color scheme" was black and red. I had 1500 red cat5e patch cables. All the switches connect via fiber, but the old school networking guy in me still screams when I walk into a room full of 1500 red patch cables...even if it is pretty.

rhino777
rhino777

Did I miss something? What's wrong with red?

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

I was using fiber to interconnect so it didn't matter. Once upon a time red was only used in crossover cables to connect switches together because they are wired differently. It also made it readily visible which cables were your uplinks to other switches. Red also meant "stop! don't unplug me!" Still to this day, I don't like to use red patch cables as it makes me subcinciously second guess my actions at times.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

K:Wait, it appears that patch lead you intend on using is a crossover! M: How can you tell? K:I scanned (que red light & some fake computer working & spinning graphics) the molecular structure of the cable and deduced the crossing of the pairs. That and 5 bodies are approaching from the north. M:Thanks KIT - I just about hooked up the machine incorrectly, meet me out back pronto. dung, dugga, dung, dung ,duuuuuuung.

michaelaknight
michaelaknight

Never understood that, yes red were always crossovers. then for some reason especially with "smart switches" belkin would provide a yellow crossover just in case you were too dense to change port 12/24 to straight through. I don't have an aversion to red, but damned if I don't examine every yellow patch before plugging it in.

Tig2
Tig2

For years I had a pair of 10' pink network cables that went everywhere I did. The pink was so that I knew immediately which ones were mine in virtually every closet I have ever been in. The red would have made me crazy...

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

I use pink at the core. I have no idea why...just seemed the thing to do. It's a subtle reminder that I'm in a very delicate area and need to have my head right if I'm there. Thakfully that was an off site building and I never had to look at the red unless there was hads on troubleshooting needed or expansion needed.

GSG
GSG

I installed a fetal monitoring system some years ago in our OB department. They had some special switches and networking requirements, so of course I used pink cables to make sure I could identify the OB cables at a glance. Our network person here heartily approved because if you mess with those cables, centralized monitoring goes down and really loud, annoying alarms start going off. When that happens, the nurses can get a bit snippy with us. So, pink means no touching these cables.

Ian Thurston
Ian Thurston

The second thing I did on my first consulting job ... ...was enter del *.* in the root directory of the main database system of my first client. The first thing I did was ask if they had backups in case something went wrong. The third thing I did was discover that the two on-site backups and the one in another province had not been checked, and in fact were useless. The fourth thing I did was to go to the president of the company and tell him I'd be working for him for free for a while as I reconstructed the system I toasted. Oddly enough, they kept me around for a few years until they could afford to hire a full-time staff person

gypkap
gypkap

I was told by a superior to load the same version of a realtime operating system on each of 8 linked minicomputers. Wrong--they each had their own custom version of the OS, and only the primary computer (which had the version that was copied) worked. We had to reload the OSes from backups...

MikeGall
MikeGall

So had a broken keyboard on a system. Not a problem I had a spare. The computer was wedged into the corner of a desk and secured (so really awkward to get a look at the back). Anyways I plug in the new keyboard, but it doesn't work. Strange. So I reboot the system figuring USB must not have autodetected it. Nope didn't work. I take the keyboard off and put it into my laptop works fine. Turns out after some gymnastics to get a look that while feeling for a port I wedged the USB connector on the keyboard into a second network port on the back not once but twice. Duh. Fortunately the users didn't have any better view of what was going on in the back otherwise they would have had a pretty good laugh I think.

Steve Romero
Steve Romero

I was in my first year in the Data Communications Group at Pacific Bell. I was responsible for remote-site implementation of our "new" X.25 Packet-switching network. I made the midnight drive from San Diego to Pasadena to cut over a bank of modems at one of our smaller computer sites. The building was completely empty - which was normal in those days before heightened security. I searched and searched and searched for the light switch in the computer room. After an hour of complete frustration I lifted the plastic cover over the big square red button on the wall and...ARGH!!! The room went pitch black after I lost the glow of the little red, amber and green dots that once filled the center. Who installs the light switch down the hall, around the corner, in a breaker box?!? I spent the remainder of the night (morning) immersed in my first disaster recovery experience. The computer operations group cut me a lot of slack and helped me look at the bright side. It was a training experience because they got to learn how to reboot the main system in the center - which had not gone down in 7 years of operation. Steve Romero, IT Governance Evangelist http://community.ca.com/blogs/theitgovernanceevangelist/

cupcake
cupcake

I did this great one year stint at Disney TV&Pics, where they upgraded all their Macs from OS 6 to OS 7... I went in, backed up their drives, re-initialized the hard disk and installed the new OS, then copied their data back. I'll bet you can see where that went. One day, having an issue with a contact lens, just as I hit the key to start the initialization process realized that I hadn't backed up their data. I had my @ss covered in that I had sent everyone I planned to work on that day to do a backup, but this one hadn't done a backup in several days. Needless to say, they were not happy and I was relieved for the remainder of that department, but went on to finish the other 800 or so users without a hitch. Nothing like experience to keep you vigilant from that point forward! Oh, and the time I was complaining about a boss' email that I meant to hit "forward" and hit "reply" instead and comment on what a b!tch she was being... well suffice to say I don't work there anymore! If you can't laugh at yourself, you can always find others to do it for you!

gavin
gavin

Not a personal encounter, but a note worth telling. A friend of mine ghosted (using Norton Ghost) the destination HDD over the source... not the other way around... resulting in 2 completely empty HDD's. No recovery was possible.

Betageek52
Betageek52

BEEN THERE, DONE THAT, HATED IT.

dvanduse
dvanduse

I used a machine to test our new content filter by going to playboy.com, which placed this in the IE history. A PC tech decided to use this PC as his ghost image and copied it to about 100 machines, all of which showed playboy in the history. Fortunately I had a legitimate reason for trying to go to this page, so no one was more than embarrased.

qtip20
qtip20

I'm glad mine wasn't too much of a disaster....when we first upgraded from NT4 to Server 200 and active directory, I being a junior network admin didn't realize deleting objetcs really meant deleting objects. I hadn't had my training yet in AD. I saw a bunch of users in an OU that I didn't think was right so I simply deleted the OU, thinking there'd be a "copy" of them somewhere else.

greenhouse
greenhouse

I did the same thing early in my stint working for a city. As usual I confirmed deletion without having read the confirmation dialog. Deleted the entire OU for the City Managers office -- the person who actually runs the city.

annpieri
annpieri

I sent a note to my husband with a comment regarding upcoming weeked...that went something like this - I'm looking forward to helping your mom this weekend but not looking forward to seeing your sister..." not realizing I had done a "reply all" with her email address on the cc...still digging myself out of that hole.

reisen55
reisen55

A professor went on vacation and set his email to automatically send out the standard "on vacation" message. Off he goes. Unfortunately, one colleague, or more, had set their email profiles to automatically reply with a confirmation receipt for incoming emails. Think about it. Automatic reply>automatic receipt>another>another>faster..... Brought the whole email system down.

almostfm
almostfm

I was working for a company that did software for city and county governments. One of the developers had come up with an app that would scan an e-mail subject for a building permit number, and auto reply with the status of the permit (so that people wouldn't have to call the city Building Department to get the info--just send an e-mail and get an auto reply). She wanted me to help her test it by sending an e-mail, and seeing if I got the correct info back. Since we were both working "heads down", we had both set our "out of office" message to reply to any e-mails. I sent the test msg, and got back the e-mail response, plus the out of office reply. My system sent out of office messages for the two I recieved, and immediately got two "permit" replies, plus two out of office messages. This lead to my computer sending hers four out of office messages... I finally disconnected from the network to break the loop, at which point I had several hundred messages in my outbox :-)

Fregeus
Fregeus

From IT: Needed to find out if the main file server of the company had one simm of RAM or two. Decided to simply remove the siding of the server and look. Did not know about this new feature in Compaq server where if you remove the siding, the server immediately and very suddenly powers off. I can still see myself on my knees in the server room, siding in hand wondering; "What just happen?" At another company, i was learning routing and decided to see what the command debug did. Not knowing what debud really did, I decided it was easier to simply do a "debug all". The router was a 7206 with all incoming WAN links and all corporate routing in it. You can figure I never found what the command gave as an output. Not even one line. Before IT Once, working at a gas station, a customer comes in and asks for a fill up and to check the oil. It was a luxury vehicule, very expensive. He had been on the road a long time so the engine was piping hot. Decided to pour a quart of oil to top it off. Some of it fell on the manifold and before you knew it, the engine was on fire. I managed to extinguish the whole thing before any damage was done. I then asked my supervisor to come and see me. The idiot was talking to the customer and said, "just tell me what you want to tell me." Being taught to do what you are told, I told them what had just happen. You should of seen the customer's eyes. Worthy of the "Priceless" commercial. Ain't life grand!!! TCB

Elvis.Is.Alive
Elvis.Is.Alive

I once worked for a large retailer, and late one evening we were finishing up rolling out a large web- based learning system. It was about 10 o'clock, and we were running late in getting all the configuration data in place to "turn on" the system. So, about that time, my mentor calls me up from his home and asks how things are going. The whole time I'm on the phone with him, in the background, I'm copying pasting SQL queries and running them straight through the Query Manager into the database. One record here needs updating.... One record there needs updating.... Then, I got to one of the VERY LAST steps to update the table where all the hierarchical menu items were stored along with the links to the JSP pages. Well, I needed to update one row to set the correct link and menu name. Low and behold, I highlighted and ran the query, but I had forgotten to highlight the WHERE clause (to ensure ONLY THAT ONE record was updated). I immediately check the database, and EVERY record had the same name and link. I check the application, and YES (this was kinda funny) every link on the menu (about 75 links) all had the same name and same destination. I remember telling my mentor on the phone, "I just did something really bad." He followed up with, "How bad? ".... "Really bad", I said. So, I spent the next two hours calling up the DBAs to have them restore the database from the last hourly backup, and then I set out to re-do all the changes. I didn't get out of there until almost 2 o'clock in the morning. Now, most of you would think this is where the story ends... but wait, it gets even more interesting. So, on my way home, driving down the freeway, I'm thinking about that horrible mistake. Well, about half-way home, I see these lights in the middle of the road ahead. I'm thinking to myself, "self, what the hell are the cops doing in the middle of the road?" I get closer and realize that it isn't the cops, but it is a jet black mustang spun around in the middle of the road with the front-end smashed up and radiator fumes coming from under the hood. I immediately pull over, put the hazard lights on and rush over to see if anyone is hurt. So, there's this guy with his door open leaning against it saying... "Man... man.... dude... man...." And, I see the trickles of blood coming down from his forehead. I rush over to him and ask him to get off of the road (yeah, we're still standing there in the middle of the freeway). He says, "I can't, my leg hurts, can't move it." So, I put his arm over my shoulder to try and hobble him off the road. That's when I smell the Vodka, emanating from his breath. I manage to get him to the side of the road and I tell him to stay sitting down. In the meantime he's fumbling with his cell phone trying to call someone by the name of "J-Dog" or something. Then, this other guy pulls his car over, and I give him the low down. Well, about that time,.... I notice.... this other car... rolled over in the nearby culvert along the side of the road. It still gives me chills reliving this part of the story. I yell at the other guy who had just joined the scene, and say, "Hey man, there's another car over here! Come and help me see if anyone is hurt!" So, we rush over to the car. It is upside down, and I'm thinking "Oh my God." All of the windows and roof of the car were flattened, and we couldn't see in. We started banging on the doors yelling, "Hey, is there anyone in there." We didn't get an answer. At just about that time, the other guy, says, "Come look at this." I walk over and he is holding one of those big orange window stickers that the Highway Patrol put on abandoned cars as a warning it will be towed. I remember the relief passing through my body like a waterfall. I just couldn't imagine this night turning out any worse than it already had. Apparently, the car was abandoned on the side of the road, and the drunk driver must have collided with it sending it into the ditch. I'll never forget that SQL mistake, and I'll never forget that night.

druoff
druoff

Which I have done at least a hundred times for family, friends, clients, you name it. A LOT. Windows, Mac.. no issues ever. I've always backed up important data, double checked everything.. you know. Well I was attempting to upgrade my own personal media server, from XP MC 2002 to 2005 - so I could run Netflix on demand with WMP 11. But the upgrade wasn't going well - kept failing. So I was prompted to do a new OS Install - which at midnight after 2 hrs of failed updates, seemed like a great idea! Well of course.. I'd not backed anything up - all my media files were stored in My Documents in the previous OS and with the new install - I thought I'd lost everything! 4 yrs worth of MP3 and video ripping, 4 yrs worth of my digital photos, my own electronic music and video productions (3 albums, and hours of video mixes) and IT WAS ALL GONE! But low and behold I could see my old user directory in the Document and Settings folder.. Which of course threw a 'Permission denied' error when attempting to open, and showed it self as a Zero-k folder when checking properties... but my Drive showed that it as still as full as it was prior to the new install. So some quick searches online with my wife's laptop - some downloaded drivers burned onto a CD-R - I had wireless back on the PC, and had found out that logging into Safe Mode as admin allowed me to apply user-specific access priveleges through the Security tab in the Folder properites of my old Docs folder!! Needless to say, I was in true panic mode there.. and by 2 AM - I'd been able to restore everything back to normal - aside form all the drivers and program s/n's I needed to dig out of my archive. I felt like a total idiot.

prosenjit11
prosenjit11

There are sometimes such mistakes with updated Login Account information. This makes a mess when you try loading something on a Remote Server and working remotely with a team that is on the other part of the world. GREAT EXPECTATIONS!! Sometimes the mistake is not validating if the support could be done from an offshore development centre. This is a real life situation where the Manager is !!!! not aware of what is going on and the requirement for the application support, maybe he is not supposed to do so as he is a busy man.