Laptops

Brand new year - Same old pet peeves


Well it’s New Year Resolution time and for a fleeting minute I thought about making one. It was going to be entitled, “I’m not going to let these things get to me this year.” But the more I thought about it, the more I realized that it wasn’t going to happen.

I think most people who work with me/for me would rate me on the high end of the tolerance scale. I try my darndest to not get aggravated with my employees and colleagues and I especially try not to call out anyone in public. But as I get older, there are some things (lets call them hot buttons) that are almost guaranteed to set me off. Here is my current and growing list of behaviors (in no particular order) that are guaranteed to elevate my blood pressure as a manager:

Failing to pay attention to detail. It’s the little things that can kill you, and nothing bothers me more than having someone jump into a task or project without thinking it out and reading what is in front of their nose only to hand me a deliverable that is flawed in some way because they missed something obvious.

Real life example – I asked someone to set up a laptop and projector for a presentation that I had to do to for senior management. I would have done it myself but I had meetings prior that prevented me from doing so. I was told that the task was accomplished and the equipment set up and tested. I walk into the meeting 10 minutes prior to the demonstration and find that the laptop had gone into password protected screen saver mode – I can’t log in. I manage to correct this by the time all senior management shows up only to find that for whatever reason the laptop could not open a PDF document. Since I was demonstrating our new website pre-roll out and the person setting up the laptop knew the content I was going to demonstrate, you think they would have tried opening one of our links? The issue got fixed, but took away valuable time from the presentation and made me and conversely my unit look bad.

Taking the long and winding road. This is great for songs and for long walks, but when you are explaining something or giving a status update for goodness sakes – get to the point! If you are writing something, give the headline then fill in the details. If you are speaking to me, I will probe with questions if I want additional information. There is a difference between telling important and significant details and rambling.

Real life example – you know people like this. I can see you nodding your head. Think how much shorter meetings could be if people stayed focused and on topic!

Saying you have it covered – but you don’t. I have a simple request. If you say you are going to accomplish a task, do it or let me know ASAP what is preventing you from accomplishing it. Don’t let me get caught thinking something is done or being covered when it is not.

Real life example - If this is not a pet peeve for you, it will become one the first time you get caught flat footed telling someone something is done only to be told it is not – particularly if it is your boss.

Forcing me to micromanage you. I hate micromanagement from both sides. I don’t want to be micromanaged and I do not WANT to micromanage. Give me a task and give me my parameters and let me get to work. As a manager, that is what I want from my employees. If it takes as much effort for me to get you to accomplish the task than it would for me to do the task myself – we have a problem.

Real life example – I’m grinding my teeth thinking about an example and anything I write here will be too obvious to my staff who are savvy enough to read TechRepublic.

Not taking the next logical step. There are times when you are working on a task where you reach a conclusion and it becomes obvious what the next step is. If I am unclear as to my authority to take the next step I will ask but I always try to follow through on something to its logical conclusion if I can. This is particularly true in the cases where your work product can be tested to see if it is truly done or not.

Real life example – Someone has written code that works great with test data. Next logical step – try it with real data and see what happens. Only then can you tell me you have finished something. If I ask “Have you tested it?” and the answer is “No” then you aren’t done and don’t tell me you are. I understand that this doesn’t work in all environments, but I do believe people can do more “desk checking” than they actually do.

Hitting barriers without exhausting your resources. We all come across problems/challenges that sometimes stump us. What drives me crazy is when someone gets stuck on the proverbial speed bump and gives up. If I can Google a possible solution to your problem and you haven’t tried it or can give me a good reason why it won’t work – you aren’t trying hard enough.

Real life example – My example is in my explanation of the peeve above. I literally Googled the solution to a problem that someone spent days on. Arghhh!

Spinning your wheels and not accomplishing the task. This is the opposite of above. There comes a point in time where you have invested enough time in seeking a solution that you need to stop and ask someone a question. It’s ok not to know everything and it is ok to ask for help. Please note that this is not permission to run and bother your coworker every time you reach a challenge (see above) but know when to ask for help. People don’t want to do your work for you, but most people I know are glad to lend a hand if you are in need – just don’t abuse it.

Real life example – All IT professionals? I say this tongue and cheek but I think most of us have been guilty of this once or twice. My real life example is when I have paid contractors to come fix a problem and they run through all the “typical” solutions that I have already tried and documented the results. If I am being charged by the hour I sure as heck don’t want to pay to watch you perform work I have already done. There have been too many times when I have had to ask a contractor to “pick up the phone and either call the vendor or someone with more expertise.” It’s amazing how quickly problems can get fixed that way.

Well I have come to the end of my list and there are less than ten. This must obviously mean I’m forgetting one or two. This is where you come in. What sets you off and gets your blood boiling? Everything we can list is probably something we should or shouldn’t be doing in the workplace. Gather enough of these and we will have a template for the “perfect employee” or at least a nice list of what not to do if you want to be promoted.

In the meantime, Happy New Year and I am looking forward to your peeves.

55 comments
ThreeLittleBirds
ThreeLittleBirds

I manage a staff and in turn report to a director who oversees 3 other manager and me. Our problem is the refusal to listen to many of the things we bring up in our meetings, or flaws pointed out when we are asked to address these issues. The typical response when we are addressing an issue is "right, right". All of us know that when the director starts saying "right, right", we need to stop talking because we are being tuned out and ignored. Too often, the task falls flat and then we are left trying to defend ourselves even though it's the director's fault for following through against our advice!

scott_krol
scott_krol

Do not assume someone know how to perform the task you are asking.

nick_spanos
nick_spanos

This article describes symptoms but fails to identify the root cause of the problem. A professional takes responsibility ... a clerk waits for specific direction. IT organizations continue to hire junior people with niche technical skills who aren't experienced professionals. Junior resources view Technology and technology skills as the solution to business problems. They are not ... the appropriate use of technology solves business problems. Experienced professionals recognize the difference. IT is the only profession that devalues the resources with the most experience in favor of inexperienced junior resources with niche skills. If you don't like how these people perform, perhaps you should consider hiring experienced professionals.

d_g_l_s
d_g_l_s

We've all heard such addages as "Give a man a fish... but teach him to fish and he'll survive for a lifetime." I believe this is the very best way for us all to head in the right direction and grow as individuals to become leaders. Unlike not wanting more chefs or more chiefs we do need and want more leaders. Leaders are those who are personally taking responsability to grow, and are willing to extend a hand and show/teach how it should be with all patience. Some have never seen it done and others only poorly, hence they know not how! Let's become the leaders we want others to become and surely they will follow. Best-selling business book right now is all about this and people are hungry for it. Check out "Launching a Leadership Revolution" by Time-Warner press. My own best is not good enough yet, but in time I shall lead many who are willing to learn, grow and become leaders to do the same.

Scott Lowe
Scott Lowe

Regardless of what you do, what you say, how you say it, how you lead, how you manage, etc, there can still be people on the staff that simply haven't gotten with the program and are more interested in covering their butts than in stepping up and improving their performance. I have people on my staff to whom I comfortably delegate both authority and responsibility and others that work harder to find excuses about why something isn't done that on completing things. We have to adapt to work with both. I agree with the original article that some people SCREAM to be micromanaged, but there are the first ones that will complain about this management style. Simply put - This cuts both ways.

Sigman
Sigman

Sign outside my door: Bart Simpson writing "I will use Google before asking dumb questions" on a chalkboard. AKA "not trying"

Sysadmin/Babysitter
Sysadmin/Babysitter

You seem to EXPECT, without INSPECTION. You give generalized, non-specific instruction and expect a specific outcome. Had you given the laptop/presentation set-up person a COMPLETE set up criteria? (Believe it or not, not all presentations are .pdf files.) Why didn't you just ask them to make a printout of the .pdf documents? Without knowing the full scope of expectations, most will fail.

stryc9
stryc9

I agree, and was going to post much the same thing. Overall I disliked the tone and content of this blog post. I am glad this person is not my manager.

memman
memman

It amazes me that intelligent people spend so much of their efforts attempting to bring down those around them just to make themselves feel better. Much of the comments below this/the original article have been less than appealing for that very reason. It is not as if every business is the same. Not every IT department has plenty of laptops to go around. Not every business has the funds to support vast supplies of hardware to fix every situation. Most of us run on a string budget and have to do with what we have. Antiquated or not. Those fortunate enough to have unlimited access to resourses need to count their blessings and live in the bliss. It has been my experience that the squeeky wheel doesn't always get the oil. Many times, and especially in this day and age, it gets replaced (or farmed out overseas). Communication is key. Remember that. EVERYBODY! Managers and non-managers. It is managements responsability to give enough detail to the staff to get the job done to the specifications required. It is the responsability of the staff to ask questions if they don't understand or need further information. I do not hire people that can't work for themselves. I'm good at what I do and expect the same of who I hire. No micromanagement needed. I've been on both sides. I remember what I have gone through at both levels. No-one in management should ever let that go.

mmurray49
mmurray49

IT groups can be notoriously competitive towards one another - oft to the point of internal conflict. The most successful managers should always be on the hunt for this and should always squash it. How to spot it? In the staff meetings for one. See which people are typically rushing to get their cap feathers or talking the most (to impress).

hlhowell
hlhowell

Just because you googled and got a solution doesn't mean the person you are discussing got that same result. Changing one word will present you with a whole plethora of alternatives that may not work or match the requirements. I have done this myself, and I am not a novice. The view of the problem often affects the language one uses to seek a solution, and changes the outcome. In addition, the solution you see on google may not actually work. In fact I have had several solutions show up, none of which actually worked for the particular problem I was attempting to solve. Real work is generally more complex than one google search. I see a lot of these types of "management" things in here, but few that show me much thought is put into the issues, the people or how to improve the processes. Bastard bosses are made, and incompetant employees are ignored, and not taught. This is not a means to success or increasing the team capabilities. What if your life depended on your team, how would you then handle the situation, especially if the team you have is the only one you are likely to get in the near term? Would you treat them the same way, and deal with the same results? Regards, Les H

Will_B
Will_B

The most annoying Pet Peeve is loggin a issue for resolution, the issue being closed, and nothing is yet working. Similar to not testing the presentation, yet saying it is ready for the management meeting. To many times we waste time and money chasing down issues, with the people that should resolve them (because they have the training, skills, and job descriptions) because they don't test, and say the job is completed. They should see issues through to completion, including testing.

jaimerubio
jaimerubio

Very bad Enhligh. Too bad. PLease what is the meaning of "If I can Google a possible solution to your problem" It is Google a verb??

LocoLobo
LocoLobo

Google is a verb. It may not be in the dictionary yet but it will be. definition: To look up the solution to a problem using Google or using other internet resources.

CI-EI-EIO
CI-EI-EIO

After reviewing many of the responses to this article.I can see why many times IT staff and IT Management get put into Techie categories and are not considered business worthy... I agree with the point of the article. Many of the responders do not seem to understand or want to understand that the IT (and business) world is not made up of single un-thought-out tasks. What the person was trying to say was, if you are going to do something do it right, put a little thought into it. . .your mommy does not work here to clean up after you. Anyway that is why we get the Big Bucks (smile).

AlphaW
AlphaW

I agree with the article, some people never learn from their mistakes and require a lot of micro-management. This is aggravating to any manager. There are also people on my team that I could talk to just once a week, and never worry about them getting things done. My favorite peeve recently has been the "Nobody told me about it" line. When just opening the network settings and looking for the fixed IP address would have saved everyone a lot of headaches. Yes, no one told you it had a fixed IP, and neither did you check it yourself.

lhAdmin
lhAdmin

I thought I was the only one with those pet peeves. Are you really me in disguise? ;) One additional pet peeve is cleaning up or follow up: when you're working at a workstation or server and you've resolved the problem, take all your stuff with you (usb drives, printouts, notes, tools, failed equipment, etc). Nothing irks me more than seeing a defective monitor/keyboard/etc sitting on the floor or left somewhere else after it has been replaced. Either throw it out or if you don't know what to do with it, ask. ARRRGGHHHHH

stephena
stephena

It kills me to see my staff pull the trigger too quickly. I present the problem and within minutes they have a solution and have implemented it already without consulting one another or myself. The solution they have implemented may have been the right one, BUT the timing is all wrong and being a small business we have the "luxury" of implementing solutions at will with no paper work, approvals, change control meetings etc...(notice that I put luxury in quotes because sometimes it's not a luxury and I AM a believer in paperwork, approvals, change control, etc... as long as they are not a hindrance or road block. These are things I am looking to implement asap)! On top of that, being the new IT Manager in a company that never had real "IT Leadership", so to speak, has challenged my management and communication skills to the fullest!! My first challenge is to get out of the "small business" mindset and change the way we do things! Real Life EX: Applying a fix and rebooting an Exchange server in the middle of the day. Obviously, this is NOT a favorable solution...even though it fixed the problem!! The reality is my executives could care less about the problem or solution for the Exchange server. All they care about is there blackberry's receiving email every second of the day! And when that doesn't happen, I have to hear from them!! Arrrrgghhhhh!! Let me stop rambling before Ramon gets mad at me! lol

kdolliff
kdolliff

Knowledge hoarders - people who think they have job security if they are the only person who knows how to do something. I like to have a staff that's cross-trained - it benefits everyone. I like to tell my team that the fastest way to get promoted or assigned greater responsibility is to train someone else to do your job then learn more.

syscon
syscon

I've seen the "cross-training" strategy bomb big time. The boss thinks everybody can do everything, yet employees follow their own career agenda...when it comes time to account for actions, the blame gets tossed around. Could managers define core responsibilities first and then go fancy in cross-training? Jim

Jcritch
Jcritch

In reading some of your pet peeves, Me thinks that maybe, just maybe you are too vague in what you want done. If you have to spell out what needs to be done (Laptop setup, need to test the new web app, and open pdf's, oh BTW I will use the demo login, let me know what the password is.) If you have a employee(s) who do not seem to follow through to your expectations, YOU as the managers need to sit them down and say, I was somewhat disappointed this happened, what could we do to prevent this from happening in the future. Management is knowing everyone is a individual, with that in mind, individual mentoring will need to be developed based on the needs of the person.

BrannenT
BrannenT

I particularly love Managers who delegate responsibility but not authority. It truly inspires trust in subordinates.

CDubbs
CDubbs

These managers are power hungry devils that set their employees up to fail. I'm suppose to supervise someone, but, not really supervise. I'm not given the title, and everything has to go through the manager, but, yet, I'm responsible for this person. If the person does something they're not suppose to, I get yelled at. When I approach my manager that I'm having difficulties with said person, I'm told to allow him to fail. Huh?? Same thing with areas that I'm responsible for. I'm micromanaged, but, yet if something goes wrong, it's my fault. I can't win.

Steven_Fuhrman
Steven_Fuhrman

As one of those many employees who has plenty of responsibility, but no authority bestowed upon him by management, I have to agree with Brannen. Nobody wants to be micromanaged, but when you don't give your employees the authority to do things right, invariably they will have to "make it work" and "take shortcuts" to get things done. Case in point: I have limited rights in Active Directory. With my rights, if I want to rename a machine on the Domain, I have to disjoin it from the domain and reboot, then rename the machine and reboot, then rejoin the machine to the Domain and reboot again! If my rights were setup "properly", I should be able to just rename the machine, reboot once, login and walk away. Granted, this example may sound quite simple, but it makes a 30 second job take up to ten minutes. Multiply that times the number of machines you do this (trickle-down machines that they don't want reloaded (especially for temps/contractors) and when management changes your machine naming scheme and gives you a stupid deadline to "accomplish the task"), you've wasted many hours in a year that could have been avoided by a simple little change to your account rights. When asked about it, the concept of trust then comes up. "What if you make a mistake?" Yeah, right - that isn't the kind of answer I'll accept coming from the guy who crashed our Exchange server and made me work around the clock for a couple of days to fix his boneheaded mistake. After all, isn't making mistakes and learning from them what career growth is all about? Someone gave this dingus the trust and has promoted him up the ladder even though he has shown, time and time again, that he doesn't think things through before he acts. Simple enough... If you don't trust your employees to do the job that you've hired them to do, there are two scenarios: 1) You chose the wrong person to do the job and you should get rid of him/her. 2) You've got trust issues and shouldn't be in a management role in the first place. After all, management isn't about doing, management is about delegation.

the gaffer
the gaffer

Nothing personal, I am playing devils advocate here slightly but the things that struck me most about these peeves is that as the manager or leader you have the power to change things so why don't you! Attention to detail - I agree with the notion I hate sloppy work, but in your example I think you bear most of thr responsibility for the outcome. You gave out a menial task but no responsibility. Your team member did exactly as they were told, they set up a laptop and projector. Had you delegated more effectively, something along the lines of, I have a job that although on the face of it is a bit menial the importance of it is very high, explaining your are presenting a pdf presentation of a high profile rollout to the board and you want it to go as slick as possible so that the IT department portray a professional appearance your team memeber would of done a better job and felt better about it when after the meeting you thanked them for ensuring everything went so smoothly. Taking the long and winding road - again I think this might be as much down to you as your staff, they are not mind readers. Let them know upfront the level of detail you are expecting. If you say you want a high level summary let them give you just that but dont keep interrupting with probing questions otherwise they are going to start to think that all that detail should have been in thier original report. Give them the courtesey of waiting until they have finished thier update praising the brevity of it before digging for the detail you need. Saying you have it covered - this comes right down to effective communication, it's the manager/leaders responsibility to make sure this is in place. Micromanaging - Effective delegation and communication should stamp this out, you can even manage your boss out of this habit if you learn to communicate with them more effectively Not taking the next logival step - again this all comes down to the way you delegate, by giving them direct instructions like write this code and use some test data that is exactly what you will get back, but simply by giving a bit of responsibility along with the task such as saying this is the problem we have to over come and our process for coding is to use test data before live data, having a documented process to identify the test and signoff points you require will help you to maintin control and that way everybody is clear of what is required and motivation is improved all round Hitting barriers - again as team leader it's down to you to instill this problem solving culture in your team if thats what you want. Spinning your wheels, in total agreement here, there comes a point where it is just not worth it. Also on a note about figting fires as opposed to getting to the root cause, (finding a cure rather than treating the symptons is the way I prefer to look at it) this also needs to be considered carefully, sometimes the cure is more painful than the symptons. I have had cases where people have spent days looking to fix a recurring problem that might only happen once a month and take 5 minutes to fix. Just like a bad workman blames his tools it is all too easy for a bad manager to blame his/her staff. Again nothing personal to the people involved just playing devils advocate, as managers we have the power and responsibility to change things if they are not the way we think they should be, it's a scary thought and not that pleasant to get the process of change started but the benefits can be huge to the moral and motivation of you and the team.

viveka
viveka

Would you like to be managed or supervised? or Would you rather like to be mentored by your manager?

CDubbs
CDubbs

I can see both sides. I think with the issue of the laptop, if the tech knew what the presentation was about as the poster said, it should have been tested. Our company sets a standard for PC/laptop setup, which includes disabling the password protection on the screen saver. (Personally, I think that needs to be removed altogether. The user can always lock their PC when they walk away.) When I use to set up equipment for presentations, I would check, check and check once more that everything ran the way I'd want it to. Others may not, and I think that's more of a follow through issue than anything. As far as the communication, I feel the pain. My issues are receiving 1 or 2 sentences of directives and I'm expected to make something happen there. For example, something that had taken both the boss and the VP working on for 3 weeks straight a few years ago, I'm handed the manual and told to move it over to a new server... A book that didn't help them in one form or another and they failed to document anything. Wonderful. I'll add a pet peeve. When I bring up this type of "directive", and ask questions about it, I receive the "welcome to my world" and the "you think you have it bad, I blah blah blah blah" and the "I don't receive any proper communications too, so, why should I communicate with you" type of garbage. But, yes, the blame game... how productive is that really?

DDayton
DDayton

My vote goes to Gaffer. Ramon: If those were your pet peeves, are any of these below are on your staff's pet peeve list? -Leave instructions open ended then complain when staff hasn't "done what was asked" -Talk over/intimidate staff by interrupting with questions as they're explaining, forcing them to retrace,retract and/or summarize (what you call rambling) -Don't set expectations correctly (or at all) then arbitrarily measure performance.

grumpy bug
grumpy bug

I completely agree! I read about half the article before getting bored with the blame everyone else mentality. Over the years as a manager I have only ever had one basket case team member that I couldn't fix. As a manager this is your challenge and that is what you get paid for. I take great pride in getting my teams to work effectively and I enjoy the challenge. If you are going to start the year with that negative approach I think it is time to move on. Here's a good one I got from my boss' white board. "Culture is nothing more than the behavior of our leaders". So if you have a negative attitude what do you think is going to filter down your team.

mads.overgaard
mads.overgaard

Above is all true - but misses out on issues like... a) You do not ack yourself as a ressource b) You do not state and enforce your needs c) Your do not state and enforce your priorities a) Main characteristics of a ressource is: 1) You can do something valuable others cannot Simply because you are here now. 2) You are not alone - you are part of a team 3) You can succeed by using your skills and mind and team at your max. 4) All risk to fail, if you do not ack and flag your limits clearly. b) Some of the obvious needs are: 1) Acknowledgement of points a1-3 above And all feedback in relation to them! 2) Appreciation Nothing can work miracles like this! 3) Agreement on a Vision Having a plan for the future that get's me closer to my and the teams goals. Selfexplaining! c) Priorities are key - Period! Nothing puts me off like when you are: 1) Treated like some nonexistent, stupid, cheap comodity 2) Overheard - not respected that you actually want to add value 3) Repeatedly pushed to work harder/smarter with no real recognition or shared vision 4) Always put to blame for not meeting expectations when a), b) and c) have been clearly ignored. Enough been said - Also as a push to the managers

alex.a
alex.a

It is unreasonable to expect that all applications you need for your demo will already exist on the "loaner" laptop you will be using, unless your firm has a standard laptop configuration and you know what that configuration consists of. Personally, I find that Acrobat Reader is the one app I can rely on to be missing from "loaner" equipment. If Microsoft wants to bundle anything with their operating systems, why in the devil don't they bundle Acrobat Reader? And one of the biggest mistakes Microsoft ever made was to have the passworded screen saver kick in as default. That means that every user logging into the laptop has to disable it for himself. It sounds like your firm needs a "loaner" laptop checklist that techs will follow -- and sign off on -- when setting up equipment for demos and conferences. The checklist should include logging in as the user in question (and they'll have to know the user's password for that), ensuring that the screen saver is disabled, and ensuring that the firm standard laptop configuration is in place. It is unreasonable to expect the techs to second-guess which applications you will need and to ensure that they are in place -- unless you tell them beforehand.

mlunney1
mlunney1

I have a very simple Pro edition setup for the loaner laptops. They use a dummy name for login and there is no password. No, they cannot log on to a LAN wily nily, but I don't want them to do anything that. I told them that the laptop is too old to have a wireless connection (not true) and that they would have to get the local network person to contact me to connect to a foreign LAN. I ask the person using the laptop what they are going to do with it and since 99% of the time it is a PowerPoint presentation, I make sure that it is loaded on the laptop with an icon on the desktop pointing to the presentation and I drill the end user on how to find the icon. Since I adopted this policy in September, I have only had one call from the field, when the user couldn't find his icon. So far no one has figured out the pack of lies I told about connectivity, because the users are perfectly content to follow rules as long as everything else is working. The thing to remember is that the user compared to you knows nothing. You can tell them anything and they will believe you. I make a point of never telling them anything that I don't want them to know and I trust their human nature to never do research.

tcharles
tcharles

This was not a technical issue, it was a staff issue. The staff member didn't think, Managers are busy too. If they requested a laptop be setup for a presentation, and a staff member was given the job. Then it is that staff members responsibility to do the job, and make sure the outcome is met- namely a workable presentation. Far too often staff do the minimum, ie I plugged the laptop in! They knew what the manager was supposed to be accomplishing with the presentation and let the manager, and by implication the whole team down.

paul.warren
paul.warren

This is a fairly simple example of not communicating what you actually wanted. A laptop with projector with the tool (Adobe Acrobat) required to make your presentation. From your post, what you asked for was a laptop with a projector to be set up for you. Did you tell your staff member what you were going to do with it? Even something as vague as ?Give a presentation to senior management?? Did the staff member work with you on your presentation? Were you going to be using MS-PowerPoint Adobe Acrobat or give your presentation from a webpage? Did you even think about whether or not your staff member was aware of the necessary information, or did you just make an assumption? Sure your staffer should have asked questions, but what was the circumstance? Was it a ?drive by? request on the way to another meeting? Or is this staff member a habitual ?minimum effort? type? In which case you should have provided more info or tasked someone else. Clearly that information was not imparted or asked for, and that?s where your communications failed. Neither party sort to give or ask for the required information. That?s why your presentation and your section failed to look as good as it could have.

santeewelding
santeewelding

Please speak in plain-text English, if you are able.

santeewelding
santeewelding

You probably could have ended it with "incorrect" and "wrong," although the distinction may have been lost on (him). Youth, I think.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Go back and read the original article. Then, read the thread again. If you can actually get a couple of synapses to fire in sync, you'll figure out not only why you are incorrect, but also why you are wrong. You aren't important enough to disappoint me, your lack of reading skills is obvious and you should start thinking about paying attention.

norin.radd
norin.radd

I could not agree more with you Paul Warren. Damn, NickNielsen sounds like he is fully achieving andropause. He is such a NooB, there is way too much technologies for him to handle (-_-)zzz IT-Leaders of today needs to be human oriented and fresh with new concepts and new philosophy of communication \ ^_^ / To Be or not to Be K33N... You disappoint me NickNielsen, your lack of self-management is obvious and you should start thinking about retirement planning...

hcetrepus
hcetrepus

Our IT dept has a firm stance that anyone giving a presentation on any of our equipment check themselves that every thing they need is there, and to test the equipment with THEIR presentation to make sure that video, sound, etc is working to their liking. All too very often technical support are supposed to be mind readers.

don.gulledge
don.gulledge

This guy sounds like a typical non-tech micromanaging business degree manager who wants to filter every decision, every thing thru their fingers and is the first to blame the horse when the race is lost. What kind of IT manager doens't have his own laptop set up to perform how he needs it and has to depend upon someone else to do it for him. One that doesn't know what he's doing. But, likes to take the credit for it anyway.

Tig2
Tig2

I understand that your work flow has always been a particular thing. I understand that you don't want to change your work flow. I even understand that you don't think that you were given sufficient voice in the process of the change. I get it. But I am here to implement the change, regardless. I don't have 30, 40, 60 minutes to listen to you gripe about that. I have work to do and will thank you to let me do it. Oh, and incidentally? Taking however long you need to gripe about it doesn't change a thing. I'm still going to implement. Many of the things that you mention are also on my list. Especially the micro management thing. If you are on my team, I expect you to be a knowledgeable adult. I should not have to lead you by the hand to simple solutions. I should be able to expect you to meet your deliverables. I should not have to guide you to meeting them. If I have to hold your hand every step of the way, you become a liability to me. If I ever have to wonder why I am paying you, it is a good bet that I will stop doing so. I'm going back to my happy place now.

WhomEver123
WhomEver123

Hope I am not intruding on this thread, but I am not in a management position, but in a systems programmer position which puts a lot of responsibility on me. I have been given an underling who is supposed to do menial programming tasks to alleviate my load. It is impossible. He is from the dinasaur age of main frame programming. Not that I have anything against that. But he refuses to take any initiative and learn! I can tell him where the main .bat files are, explain to him what needs to be modified, etc. But he takes no initiative to "read" the program files, and come back with questions that shows he's even attempting to learn how to do it. I left a "simple" task in his hands, and it never got done. Plain and simple. Just didn't do it. I no longer give him programming tasks anymore, as it is just quicker for me to do them myself. Just frustrating though, cause he says he wants to learn, but doesn't put any effort into it.

Tig2
Tig2

Your programmer friend is a good example of a new thing (to me, anyway) in IT. Whenever asked, always state loudly that you are motivated to learn x,y,z. And then be very careful to NOT learn it. That way, if your management ever gets frustrated with you for not carrying your weight, you have a built in excuse. Fortunately, most IT is not like that. But they're out there. If you are this guy's line manager, why are you letting him get away with this? Failure to complete a task assignment is a problem that sounds like it is getting worse. Better to have the chat that begins with "I need to see some improvement..." He was given to you to relieve your load, not increase it.

jdclyde
jdclyde

I HATE when someone does a "quick fix" instead of solving the problem. sure, it gives them a quick "warm fuzzy" that something is working, but when that "fix" comes back to haunt you several times a week, you have shown yourself to be a liability, not an asset. I had a co-worker mention to me before about "wasting time" because it would take me longer to get something going than it did her. I then showed her how the things I fix STAY fixed, and she is spending half of her work week just keeping things from falling apart. It took a few years, but things are changing.

eugene.vanrooyen
eugene.vanrooyen

What is worse is when putting out a fire the person causes other things to go wrong. They only check what they just fixed, and not if everything else is still OK. They would close the call, only to find that next time a problem is allocated to someone else instead as passage-talk can be quite destructive and can spread faster than "computer fires"

catfood73
catfood73

Ideally you'd have a regression testing checklist for every major component. Then anyone making a change knows exactly what's expected to declare the job done. I've rarely seen these in real life.

jdclyde
jdclyde

It was upsetting for my co-worker when people would go past her office, down the hall and around the corner to my office to ask for help. They knew if I did it, it would be done.

fatman65535
fatman65535

This kind of piggybacks on your comment. Years ago, when I was a young man, I was an electrician. My supervisor [b]constantly[/b] screamed about "taking too long" to finish the job (usually new residential construction). What he never could get through his [b]fat[/b] head is that by my taking the time to make sure all of the circuits worked like they were supposed to; the company saved money on [b]not[/b] having a after move-in service call. One of the most common problems was the dumb doofuses who wired the houses, they would wire a room light switch across the power line in a room with a half or fully switched receptacle. If you turn the switch on, you will hear the circuit breaker blow out from the short circuit. Since I had the diagram of how the house was wired, when I ran across one of these f--- ups; I would fix it right there; no service call needed on that one; but fixing that took time. I am glad that I do not work for those a------- anymore.

edouarda
edouarda

One aspect of IT thta always amazes me is Business people look at IT as a nessary evil no business person understands the effort needed to accomplish the simplest tasks in an enviroment that is always changing. Our windows and linux computers are alays being updated, without updates they would eventually stop working.