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Commodore pioneer Jack Tramiel dies: Wozniak, industry and tech pros react

Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple, remembers tech pioneer and Commodore founder Jack Tramiel in an interview with Gina Smith. Tech pros who cut their teeth on early systems like the Commodore 64 and the Atari Series computers weigh in on how those early systems got them in the biz. Tramiel, 83, has died.

Jack Tramiel, the tech revolutionary and Holocaust Auschwitz concentration camp survivor who brought the Commodore 64 and Amiga Series computers to the world in the early and mid 1980s, has died at 83.

Those two computing lines were prescient in that, unlike efforts from Apple and IBM at the time, Tramiel wanted a computer for the "masses" and targeted home rather than business users. The systems were far ahead of their time in many ways.

Tramiel's death is a huge loss, Apple co-founder and inventor Steve Wozniak told me in an interview today. (Disclosure: I co-wrote Wozniak's memoir, iWoz: How I invented the Personal Computer and Had Fun Doing It -- WW Norton, 2005).

In 1975, Wozniak and the late Apple co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs tried to get a few thousand dollars from Commodore as Wozniak was designing the Apple II, which he said was in breadboard state at the time but was working already as the first color system. No go.

"Steve Jobs asked for a few thousand dollars, but Commodore decided it didn’t need color in its graphics. Chuck Peddle, who was a marketer for the firm that made the original (6500 series MOS) chips for the Apple I and II, got to Tramiel," Wozniak told me, "and convinced Tramiel that Commodore instead needed to go with cheap monochrome systems.” That was the inexpensive 1976 Commodore PET, but in 1982, Commodore entered with the Commodore 64, a truly ground-breaking system on which many tech pros cut their teeth.

I'll keep adding to this as tech pros I work with via my geeky tech blog and some I correspond with regularly on Google + and other social networks weigh in. One thing is certain: Jack Tramiel will make the history books for his prescience, early on, regarding building a computer for the home and not just business as long ago as 1976.

Not all of us remember the 8-bit C64 -- check out this vintage 1982 commercial to take a walk back in time. Our thoughts are with the family and friends of Tramiel, who are mourning today.

“Eventually, the Commodore 64 and the Amigas came out and they were really neat — unlike Apple, IBM and other competitors in the early 1980s, these were focused on the home. That was smart and Commodore really sold just so many of them. Wow, it was the right move,” Wozniak said today.

Wozniak added that he fondly remembered Tramiel and saw him not too long ago — calling him “such a nice guy.” There were no hard feelings on either part, Wozniak said, just a lot of mutual respect that only grew through the decades that followed.

"The Commodore 64 and the Video Toaster were super impressive for their time,” he said.

Anyone who owned the Video Toaster knows how far ahead of its time Jack Tramiel really was.

Tech pros I contacted expressed similar sentiments. Here's a sampling.

Shane Brady, a tech pro and computer programmer in Kansas, said something a lot of readers echoed in emails to me today, said, “I wasn’t lucky enough to be able to hack on a C64 back in the day, but the world he helped created has stood as a foundation to everything I do today on a daily basis. For that, I salute Jack Tramiel.”

New Jersey IT pro Clifford Hamblen said he had a (Commodore) 64, a 128 and an Amiga. "For its time the Amiga was one heck of a computer. Compared to the boring command line IBM PC that was in every office."

Here's an infographic that should bring back memories on the C64 -- for those old enough to remember and a great treat for those who don't.

About

Gina Smith is a NYT best-selling author of iWOZ, the biography of Steve Wozniak. She is a vet tech journalist and chief of the geek tech site, aNewDomain.net.

8 comments
Kansan52
Kansan52

I still have 2 C64's, probably still work. What a step up from my ELF II microtrainer (256 Bytes RAM) and Timex/Sinclair (4Kb RAM)! My I.T. son grew up on one. The Amiga and Video Toaster change CGI (B5 started on VT's). And people blasted the C64 use of serial ports that were USB before there was USB!!

Darren B - KC
Darren B - KC

I was a kid when these systems made thier debut, but I was an Atari 800 XL/ST guy from the beginning and I never had a Commodore. A couple of my friends in high school did, so I was definitely familiar with them. Nevertheless, I fully recognize the contribution that Commodore and the C64 made to the computing world. I salute Jack Tramiel and all that he gave to us. Rest in peace, friend.

ginasmith999
ginasmith999

The Vic-20 -- the little brother to the C64 -- was (at least according to Steve Wozniak in our book iWOZ) developed after the C64 but released first. And yes on the Video Toaster, of course, that was the Amiga. We used to cover Windows video stuff on On Computer with Leo Laporte (and me, Gina Smith) and people would ALWAYS call in and say -- my Amiga did that years ago! The Video Toaster was an incredible gadget, we hear. But it predates me computer-wise. Anyone out there have a pic of a C-64? This October is its birthday.

Internet Joe
Internet Joe

What a blast from the past. The first professional program I ever developed was on a C64. It tallied pool table revenue by time and also gaming (poker) machines. It gave the operator shift check out forms and daily reports. All contained on one floppy disk. However, it's biggest claim to fame was we used the game port to supply voltage to trip relays that controlled several garage door wireless units that would send a signal to a switch on one of 8 poker machines, to turn it off and on thereby clearing its memory and resetting the credit count.

Craig_B
Craig_B

All I can say is I had a lot of fun, playing, learning, programing, repairing, BBSing, etc. with the Commodore 64/128. They were great computers and were a launching pad into IT for me. Thanks???

steve
steve

The VIC20 was colour and came before the C64. The Video Toaster (from memory) was for the Amiga not the C64. :)

tyyggerr
tyyggerr

1) Jack Tramiel had nothing to do with the Amiga. He had already been bought out by his Board of Directors, and put the money into buying the Atari Home Computer Division from Time Warner, when Commodore bought Amiga Development Company. The Motorola 68000-based computer that Tramiel brought out was the Atari ST series. 2) The Video Toaster was developed by NewTek Inc. for the Amiga 2000, again, Jack Tramiel had nothing to do with it.

Realvdude
Realvdude

Sorry, Steve is wrong. My uncle bought both units when they introduced, and there was a year between them. The VIC-20 was always less expensive that the 64, and was the first computer I owned at $79 closeout from Toys R Us. The Dataset cassette unit was another $79. Commodore was not only aiming at the home market, but education as well. As I recall, they published a whole series of primary education software, amongst other companies. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_VIC-20

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