IT Employment

Do you google job candidates?


If yo do, you're not alone. In a recent survey conducted by CareerBuilder, one in four managers have used search engines to screen job candidates, and more than a third have eliminated a candidate based on the information they found.

In my Career blog, I talked about the dangers of this practice from the perspective of the job candidate I thought it would be interesting to hear from IT managers who have googled a job candidate, only to find some information that may taken that person out of the running.

So, have you used the practice?

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

15 comments
HAZELBLUEBUILDER
HAZELBLUEBUILDER

Do you know anyone for CRM Project manager (25-65) people) for Cable/Telephony/Order Processing. Full project life cycle in LI NY Outstanding pay

ITfor20+
ITfor20+

I noticed that ever since I posted a public profile on LinkedIn (Http://www.linkedin.com), when I or others google me, it is at the top of the list. This seems to hold for most of my friends as well. Unfortunately it does not hold for people that have very common names of those of hitorical figures (famous or otherwise). So if you have a not to common name, it is a good idea to have a LinkedIn profile!

ITfor20+
ITfor20+

I have Googled potential hires. Now that I am consulting and considering permanent positions, I do the same for the companies and INTERVIEWERS - A company/headhunter usually tells you at least the day before the names and often the titles of the people you'll be seeing. Google them! You can gain a real advantage if you can find out more about the individual. You may even find a blog about the job, company, etc. by the individual.

mikeramm
mikeramm

I haven't done it but it seems a good idea. I always take a look at the candidate's web site or blog and it gives me a better impression of his or her personality. I think googling will help also. Thank you!

adam_robles
adam_robles

No, I really don't. You really can't believe what you read. I prefer to check references and perform a background check. I will may even ask about something questionable. I think it is important to keep in mind that everyone brings their own unique circumstances to the table and that is how I prefer to make my decisions about some one.

stuoutlaw1
stuoutlaw1

I googled myself all three names and got 578000 hits in .09 seconds Who am I???

Eoghan
Eoghan

Problem is, many people have the same name. I know if I google my name I find out that I am a photographer (well known), a wrestler, a truck driver and a political activist.

wrlang
wrlang

Most people google potential hires to find information they can't legally ask in an interview. There's a reason you're not supposed to ask those questions and that's reason enough not to Google. Forget Google, hone your interview skills instead. That will pay off when you find a candidate that doesn't have a web presence.

sade5000
sade5000

the problem was very easy ... i change one of DDR becose one was 400 MHz and the other one was 320 Mhz ...thank you 4 assistence and hope you will answer mw again if i will have any question about hardware ...

tuvals
tuvals

Checking personal references and doing a background check on an applicant is all that is needed. With a resume in hand you can ask questions and also afford a candidate you are interested in a face to face opportunity. As for looking at resumes posted online I shun that completely. The only resumes I will review are those sent directly to my company by an applicant.

Fred123456
Fred123456

As a member of the judicial system we search out as much as possible. We are required to do extensive background checks on employees which, includes name searches using Google, Yahoo, and our own internal search tools including criminal background checks and DMV traces. I think most companies should use web searches to investigate new and current employees. You can't beleave everything you read, but you also have to weigh the word itself and the context.

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

there is a hilarious video segment of Marge Simpson saying this while typing in her name on google, coming up with a million hits. Then she trys Google Earth and sees (live) Homer in the back yard naked on a hammock. She races out to rage at him and it shows live in the google earth window on the screen. If you're going to blog non-tech stuff, couldn't hurt to put a screen name. So that when the Chinese own this country or the terrorists have established sharia law, they won't know who you are :)

stan
stan

even more than I knew... Besides maintaining residences in several countries and many states, I discovered I'm a professor, a champion arm wrestler, end many other things. But the biggest surprise was that I have 17 grandchildren! And at such a young age! I have never googled a job applicant because its difficult to tell if the information refers to the applicant or someone else. And I really don't care what an employee does on their own time, as long as it doesn't affect my company.

btljooz
btljooz

"googling" the name of a potential hire a truly useless proposition since you have to try to figure out which one is which. It's also a colossal waste of valuable time that could be spent in actual INTERVIEW with a particular job applicant. In addition to which, it's gross invasion of privacy. What a person does on their OWN time has nothing to do with their business life if they are smart. ;)

Marty R. Milette
Marty R. Milette

What a person does on their own time CAN be an indicator of what they may be likely to do on YOUR time (and with your equipment and resources). Don't forget, customers can also Google and things done by your employees can put your company in a very bad light. I'm pretty sure Google will never hire me for some of the postings I've made! :)

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