CXO

Does IT have a problem with women?

If we can shed some of the industry's juvenile past, while maintaining this merit-based culture, IT will attract all comers, regardless of gender.

You've likely heard about the kerfuffle over SendGrid's former Developer Evangelist Adria Richards. The short story is that Ms. Richards overheard comments made in poor taste at a Python developers conference, most noteworthy of which were some puns on the word "dongle," an unfortunately-named hardware "key" of sorts used to unlock software features by being plugged into a computer.

Richards tweeted the remarks, as well as names and pictures of the offenders, which resulted in their firing by their employer. As tempers flared, Richards was also fired. As this occurred over a month ago, some of the most inflamed passions have died down, and the flashpoints surrounding this incident seem to fall into one of three camps. The first camp contends that Richards made a mountain out of a molehill, not only taking offense at fairly benign remarks, but resorting to what amounted to public shaming via social media rather than a simple face-to-face conversation that could have resolved the issue on the spot and saved all parties from losing their jobs.

The second camp laments the privacy implications of the whole mess. I've certainly exchanged my share of jokes that may have been in questionable taste, and likely giggled like a grade schooler at a dongle reference or two at some point in my life; however, I've never had to fear instant, global public shaming for this.

Finally, for many the entire incident is symptomatic of a broader problem within IT. Women are forced to contend with a juvenile "boys club," where everything from hardware to source control is replete with unfortunate, vaguely sexual names. If nothing else, sheer numbers indicate the obvious fact that IT is still a male-dominated field. The industry has spent decades trying to increase female participation, and while most tech organizations are no longer seas of white, male faces, women remain a minority, and a quick visit to an advanced computer science class indicates that's unlikely to change in the near term. On the surface, it does indeed look like IT has a "women problem."

My take on the Richards incident is that IT suffers more from a lack of professionalism than some sort of broad, anti-female conspiracy. I've often wondered if the stereotypical image of startup keg parties and poorly groomed "dudes" turn broad swaths of people, men and women alike, away from an IT career more than any other factor, creating what amounts to a vicious cycle. Companies and roles that don't have this borderline-fraternity legacy seem to have more women, and a correspondingly more professional demeanor, although it's unclear which is cause and which is effect.

In Richards' case, this lack of professionalism on both sides may have compelled her to publically slander peers rather than take a more tactful and respectful route, a response that likely doesn't bode well for someone whose primary job responsibility is uniting developers behind your employer's software platform.

So, what can IT do to clean up its act? Must we all don topcoat and tails and immediately terminate anyone who utters "hard drive" with so much as an inkling of a smirk? Obviously not, but we can also hold ourselves to standards that demand respect of ones self and ones peers. I've always admired the Ritz Carlton motto: "We are Ladies and Gentlemen serving Ladies and Gentlemen." If this were the case in IT, the whole "dongle incident" would likely not have occurred, and if it did, some even-handed words would likely have resulted in an apology and handshake. Rather than "Ladies and Gentlemen," it seems that in this incident an appropriate motto might have been "We are self-absorbed asses serving ourselves."

At its best, IT is one of the few fields in which brains and hard work are rewarded based on merit, rather than tenure or title. Technical chops are recognized regardless of age, race, country of residence, political leanings, or gender, and youthful intellectual curiosity is celebrated more than curmudgeonly political manipulations. If we can shed some of the industry's juvenile past, while maintaining this merit-based culture, IT will attract all comers, regardless of gender.

About

Patrick Gray works for a global Fortune 500 consulting and IT services company and is the author of Breakthrough IT: Supercharging Organizational Value through Technology as well as the companion e-book The Breakthrough CIO's Companion. He has spent ...

296 comments
flotsam70
flotsam70

I think it has little to do with sexism and a lot to do with the differences in the way most (yes, there are exceptions) men and women are wired. Most women I know simply don't have the abstract, critical thinking skills (nor interest in acquiring them) required to make it in IT. However, women generally have people skills out the wazoo and will consistently put their male counterparts to shame in roles where communication skills are paramount.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen moderator

Stupid reference to male and female connections? How is that sexism? It mirrors life.

jpcici
jpcici

I am just rotflmfao. I'm 62. I've seen nothing but sexism in IT. I changed careers from HR (labor relations, in case any of you know what that is) to IT and that was 30 years ago. And that was in manufacturing. Just hysterical. That's exactly why women don't go to engineering school in college. Or, am Iiving in Saudi Arabia?

ByeNaryGal
ByeNaryGal

As a woman in IT, i have yet to see anyone make silly jokes about hard drive. I'm quite suprised that people do that and honestly I believe hearing it would make me laugh because it is such a lame comment to begin with. If someone reports a person for that, they are simply overly sensative. However, I do believe there is a "boys club" within IT. I've seen other women left off of projects and conveniently left off meeting lists. From personal experience, I had stuck as an associate for several years even though I trained my senior team members. The best thing I ever did was leave.

whiterabbit-6dcb6
whiterabbit-6dcb6

It's a very good comment. I'm tired of reading about "women's issues" instead of "equality and diversity problems in IT". Moreover, it seems that it actually helps to keep considering people for their demographics, not skills. And it shifts the responsibility to the target of discrimination. Companies don't hire women and older workers? Come on, those people just don't want to be in IT, it's not their environment. Women can't study in the same classroom as men, are offended by "men's culture". Older workers don't want to study new skills. "Solution" - teach young women some coding skills, hire a couple of tokens, create rigid office policies, and call it "diversity"... And then we're done with equality.

mdeath_2000
mdeath_2000

"some of the most inflamed passions have died down", so because you've got nothing else on you've decided to re-ignite it. so I'll say what I said last time. Grow the hell up, everyone. If adults acted like adults, at work and not at home in the basement with you most beloved(s) then we wouldn't be having this conversation. The problem is people not taking responsibility for the stupid or just plain wrong things they do. Then they feel the need to"discuss" it. Anybody old enough to hold down a job in IT knows the difference between right and wrong. They also know how they would or would not want themselves or someone they loved to be treated. thanks for contributing to the divisiveness that plagues our society.

bratwizard
bratwizard

Who wants to mentor a woman who could turn around at any moment and claim that something you said was sexually harassing and gets you fired (or worse)??

1000462824
1000462824

I am sick to death of listening to how unfair the world is to women and how all problems that women have, seem to be male generated. I grant you that 20 or 30 years ago there was a huge inbalance in favour of men but we are all lot more educated and attitudes have changed very much for the better. However as an IT Programme manager I have occasion to recruit large numbers of IT consultants to assist with the projects I am working on. The ratio of male to female applicants would be around 10 male to 1 female applicants. This would be a problem if this was the ratio of women recruited on a 50 - 50 applicant basis but it is not. Nobody stops females applying for jobs in the IT world and I believe that nowadays, very few males working in a modern environment exhibit a bias against women. I admit that laughing and joking at silly inuendo's could be offensive to some people but is certainly not discriminatory, nor is it sacking offence. (by the way I have heard an awful lot of inuendo from the female perspective as well.) I remember working in a female orientated call centre situation when I was about 25 years old. On my last day I was presented with a watch from the call centre girls and was stripped to my underwear by 30 or 40 women who thought it was great fun. Luckily so did I, and took it that way. However reverse that situation where 30 or 40 men stripped a woman to her underwear and could you imagine the consequences, there would be an awful lot of P45's being handed out. Where a person is found to be offended or upset by inuendo or silly jokes then it should be handled by management by way of informing or warning an offender. Then of course persistent offenders would be weedled out and fired as a last resort. The work place is already an extremely stressfull environment without having to carefully check every word and syllable that passes your lips in case you offend somebody. I think that it is time that we started to look at this perceived problem with a little more practicality and common sense. Maybe a lot of the problems that we have are caused by the litigation culture rather than hurt sensibilities

britontn
britontn

I really am appalled by the Employer who fired those two geeks for making jokes in their private conversation! Which world are we living in? There is a thing called free will people! And we all are free to choose what career we want. If you can't stand the heat don't go be a chef! If the majority of women don't wanna work in IT(for whatever reason), thats their choice. The industry is not suffering a shortage of IT professionals so no need to market it! And in this industry, its not what gender you are that matters. Its what you can do! Nothing sexist about it. Ms Richards has a problem and I can understand why she got fired! Which employer would want to employ an unstable employee like her? (Male or female) IT pros are bound by a code and the first one is that of privacy and confidentiality. She didn't respect that code and flighted a private conversation worldwide. Those guys should sue her! For the record, I work for a very large institution (2800 employees). Out IT team is 3/5 women!

Imperion1
Imperion1

Women are way too sensitive. I have women that work with me that can dish it out too.

aboba0
aboba0

"...slander peers..." My understanding of the word slander, and legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com's definition of the word are both "...someone tells one or more persons an untruth about another which untruth will harm the reputation of the person..." To me saying she slandered the men who made the sexual remarks is an indicator that she committed an offense and an indication of bias against what she did. Judges have made national news for publicly shaming people by making them stand on the street with a placard revealing to passers by what their offense was. So long as such morronic behavior is sheltered by silence/privacy it will not be eliminated. I certainly don't believe Ms. Richards should have been fired.

56Wrecker
56Wrecker

EVERYONE has "a problem with women" (even other women). It is a part of REALITY. NO "Big Deal". So What? (too many self-centered, narcissistic, "bleeding hearts".) a NONSENSE bit of "bitching", I think.

mjfoy_sr
mjfoy_sr

Some of the comments are knee jerk (whoops) reaction to having their legs pulled, (woops). However I sure the men and women in IT are bigger (hee-hee) than most of the comments there. And what was she thinking putting that on the Internet the equivalent of de-panting (whoops again), the probably unsuspecting Dick and Harry and Tom (whoops) and costing them their jobs. They should have sued her for that. Seriously though we have to find away pass this crap. Having more women in IT is good for the country and can reduce visa workers. But everyone needs to have some sense and sensitivity. but Hard drives that's way to p.c. for me.

yattwood
yattwood

that I found the one field where a strange duck like myself (6'2", black female DBA who absolutely adores Doctor Who, Battlestar Galactica, Star Trek and whose favorite NFL team is Whomever Is Playing Dallas) could find interesting, enjoyable work with intelligent human beings of both genders and different nationalities...I don't care if someone is hot-pink-and-chartreuse-up-down-strange-charmed-what have you - as long as they can do the work - that's what ultimately matters!

yattwood
yattwood

I've gotten used to being the only woman, or one of the only women in a group of IT people (I'm a DBA, Oracle/SQL Server) ...my first job was working on a major Eastern railroad, in freight yards (a double-entendre-rich environment - trains/coupling), that did not have separate bathrooms for women, and I dealt with the situation. My children were all boys, so most of my life has been spent in a male-oriented environment. I've found it's best to let men be men; when they make comments about female attributes, I remark that UPS guys tend to have nicer legs than FedEx guys (it's the little brown shorts) and way better legs than the US Postal Service...

Tech U!
Tech U!

I unwrapped her software... she formatted my hard drive... we increased the processor speed... it was time for a reboot... sorry got lost in my own fantasy :) Women are smart, they want to get into this mind bending arena of ever changing crazy technology. Really who does? I am in tech because I have bills to pay and a family to raise .. that's it. When the money stops... I stop.

CharlesGreever
CharlesGreever

This is dumb, if women want to do what needs to be done to get into the industry, then they can.

Opsiscrm
Opsiscrm

I endorse wholeheartedly the comment about the lack of professionalism in IT. To me this seems to show up in two main areas - Dress code - while certainly I do not feel that top hats and tails are necessary, there are many IT departments where a sharpening of dress would flow into attitude towards others, both colleagues and clients (internal or external); - An attitude that the business should be subservient to IT which also includes the lack of business interest that many IT professionals have. This in turn shows in the idea that technology is a toy for IT people to play with, rather than a serious business tool, that has to be made to work in an efficient way for people with less knowledge than the IT professionals

vechester
vechester

Of all the issues we deal with in our industry, do we really have to answer this question? In fact, I feel somewhat insulted that my gender is even a consideration and I'm pretty sure it's discriminating to even suggest that we need to hire a certain "type" of employees. I have worked with some talented people in my career, some males and some females, and it really didn't matter what they were but more what they did, how well they did there job, what new technology ideas did they bring to the workplace, and most importantly, did they have any chips on their shoulders. Perhaps we need to do a more thorough examination of IT professionals. Let's take a survey of how many American Indians we have in IT; heck let's even break it down by tribal nations! How about how many Irish Americans are in IT? Oh and I'm sure we will need to know how many of them are females. Seriously, there will always be certain jobs that naturally attract certain genders, not because our society has done anything wrong, but just because. I shouldn't be made to sit on the sidelines just because we "need more women" in IT. What we need is more innovative thinking, more focus on getting IT to serve the business or organization in better and more efficient ways. Do we really care about gender, I don't! And neither should my management if they want to stay within the law!

Messier
Messier

Just like football, social media like Twitter and Facebook have become "the devil". Don't like what you hear? Crack open you laptop or fire up your smartphone and craft a diatribe about your offence to what ever ails you .... But do so with the thoughts that current and future employers are "creeping" your profile and what ever you publish can, and will, be used against you.

acruess
acruess

Having been in IT for 15 years and sit in meetings on a daily basis where I am often the only female, I do feel IT needs a few more women, but have no idea how to make that happen. In my environment (higher ed), the guys are great - treat me with respect, never make sexist remarks and almost all are not self-absorbed asses.

bigjude
bigjude

Forty years ago, as a young woman executive with a major US multinational operating in New Zealand, I was genuinely shocked at the sexual antics of my male subordinates at a sales conference where I was the only woman. They invited two women for every man to the first night barbecue. Kindly (and I really believe that they were being inclusive rather than sexist) they'd invited a male companion for me. I went to bed early (by myself) and at breakfast was joined a collection of exhausted but very relaxed tom cats. Later I quietly ascertained whether their behaviour was normal for company conferences and discovered that it was.They were simply being over excited over sexed young men letting off steam. Since then I've observed the gender balance changing in most fields of business and most men becoming far less flamboyant. Are we going to lose the world to political correctness? Adrianna Richards deserved the sack. I personally would never employ her. Who on earth does she think she is discrediting her company and making enemies for it? Away to the back room with her, preferably with a lock on the door. She should never be let loose in a business social atmosphere ever again. As for the need for gender balance in IT, that's rubbish, too. If the job appealed to women, they'd be there.

jgeronimo
jgeronimo

It's not so much a "...lack of professionalism..." as I believe it to be a lack of leadership. I also believe the perceived mentality supported by the persona displayed of IT-types in sophomoric movies and other media plays into some IT-types' willingness to act out the persona and of course those are the ones getting all the press. I'm confident IT does not have a problem with women as much as I believe some women have a problem with the personified IT-types.

Vorpaladin
Vorpaladin

Why are the primary education and nursing fields dominated by women? Because few men are attracted to that kind of work while a lot of women are. Has nothing to do with a lack of opportunity -- men could dominate those fields if they wanted to. Both offer good pay in most areas too. Some people get really bent out of shape if you suggest that there are real, inherent differences between what men and women like to do with their time. And yet all you have to is show an episode of The Three Stooges to a room full of men and a room full of women to see what I'm talking about. The simple truth is that most women prefer to spend their time involved in nurturing and caregiving activities. Men gravitate towards mechanical and quantitative / logical problem-solving activities. Why is this the case? Consider the problem anthropologically, rather than with a knee-jerk reaction to a concept that might offend your politics. There is a lot of evidence showing that before recorded civilization began men were typically builders and hunters while most women were primarily caregivers and would also gather food when they had time. These roles largely persist today. Evolution is a VERY slow process. Part of why this asymmetry exists is because women control population growth. If your group has 100 women, your group can produce up to 100 children per year (roughly). If the same group only has 1 women, it can only produce 1 child per year. This is independent of the number of men in the group. Therefore the "health" of the group itself is completely dependent on the health of the women. The men are expendable. That should thrill your inner-feminist! For the good of the group, men take the greatest risks (i.e. hunting large game) and will sacrifice themselves to protect the women. By contrast, the women take as few risks as possible for exactly the same reason, and the best low-risk activity that they can engage in for the health of the group is protecting and raising the children, as well as caring for sick and injured adults. Which brings us back to "IT". IT is mechanical to some degree. It is mostly logic and quantitative problem solving. It doesn't have much of a human-contact component. Some women are attracted to that kind of environment. Most are not. More power to those who are -- I say go get 'em sister! You see this with online games too. Consider EVE Online. You research how to fit your ship for maximum capability for whatever task you want to accomplish, from mining 'roids to killing people. You organize into gangs and go out and hunt other players for sport. You manufacture star ships and their components. You can play the commodities market. How many women do you think this game attracts? The answer is very, VERY few. They have every opportunity in the world to participate, and the vast majority choose not to. Can't women be allowed to choose what they want to do? Does anyone think we need to force a certain number of women to work in IT just to get the numbers to 50/50? I sure hope not.

elleno
elleno

Women have a problem with IT. The majority of women don't aspire to be an IT geek: that is the domain of the introverted male.

pgm554
pgm554

not with women. Considering the latest Georgetown survey for worst career fields ,IT was up there (or down there) with a 14.7% unemployment rate. Maybe women hare just too smart to get involved in a career path that is at the moment,sucking big time.

nonsequitr
nonsequitr

I've spent the better part of almost 40 years in IT. I was there when a computer filled a room the size of an auditorium and held less data than a bad floppy. I think the real problem in IT is the arrogance of "the breed" and some women (and men) take it the wrong way. Yes, there are juvenile asses in IT, but they also abound in other professions -- nothing new. It's the way the IT person looks down their nose at someone who doesn't quite have the skills or experience. I have managed more IT people (men and women) who made bad jokes about 'loose screws behind the keyboard" then I care to remember. If we can get rid of THAT attitude, more talented people of both genders would probably apply.

gary
gary

Ok girls, I sorry, women, perhaps it is time to acknowledge that not every boy in IT is against you. I think that the quality of the IT Professional lies in the person's character and not their gender. I have no problem working for a woman but I do have a problem working for a person who is targeting the next promotion or is so paranoid that the work environment becomes one of constant fear. Gov Howard Dean used to tell a story about his staff. It was made up of women. One day, he told his chief of staff that the next hire had to be a man. She retorqued: "But we can't find any qualified men." Stupidity and arrogance are not a function of gender.

jsargent
jsargent

The only sexist word that I can connect with the author's comment about "...everything from hardware to source control is replete with unfortunate, vaguely sexual names..." is .....oh crap! the author is talking plain bollocks!!! And I am a person who welcomes the politically correct culture. Sometimes some authors need to get a grip on reality and to my mind the guy is doing more damage to the IT balance than to fix it.

jpcici
jpcici

I am a woman who's worked in IT since 1982 when the 1st IBM PC's started entering the workplace. I had a previous career in HR in high tech in the Silicon Valley. There was a time, during my lifetime, where "Help Wanted" ads were separated by sex and color and it wasn't that far away - 1968 until a SCOTUS decision in 1972 said that an employer could not discriminate against women based on sex. The next fall quarter, the law school, business school, engineering school, medical school, vet school and the sciences were suddenly open to women. I went to the Univ. of MN so it's not like it was a small college. Before that, there were different GPA requirements for men and women to all the professional colleges by a whole grade point. There is a definite lack of women in IT and there always has been. I've adapted probably mostly because I was a tomboy as a kid. I did laugh the first time that I heard about a master drive and a slave drive but I didn't get upset at all because I knew it went way back to the early days in computing. Female and male cable ends? Didn't bother me - I didn't even laugh. So there are some of us who do quite well in that environment but it's not easy for alot of women in college. For a while there, women were going into IT in college but got turned off because of the way they felt they were treated. I went to business school - which didn't have terms like that but again, when I started, it was a male-dominated career.

fhrivers
fhrivers

...who want to have a well-balanced life. That's why many of them are smart enough to stay the hell away.

greg.dargiewicz
greg.dargiewicz

I don't particularly agree with the male author of this article, and like most here, I think that Richards probably could have handled this issue a lot better. However, I have a hard time going from that, to thinking that comments like this are any better, in substance: "Here we go again. Women want to be part of IT, but only if things change the way they think it should be." Most of the comments here are just the other side of the same coin that Richards is said to have played: over-reactive and negatively generalizing nonsense about what women think, how they act, what they want, etc. It's the depth of ignorance in most of these comments that I find most disturbing.

KajalD
KajalD

@flotsam70 :-) it was funny to hear an Asian friend of mine note to me that she would have never been able to become an engineer at all if she grew up in the USA,  much less the awesome kick-ass engineer she is. In Korea, nobody told her she was not supposed to be good at logic or critical thinking!! Turned out, she naturally excelled at Math and Science and engineering was her natural path.
Now she is having to try to shield her daughter from the same messages that you just rendered here.

jpcici
jpcici

You mean that you've never heard the stupid reference to male and female connections? How about master and slave HD's?

bratwizard
bratwizard

Voicing a concern that many men have, out-loud, so that it can be discussed gets a down vote.

dave
dave

of you and I'll post it on Twitter with some sort of questionable caption. I find that those who stand up and support things like what AR did usually are the first to scream and yell if that same thing is done to them. Please consider how you would feel if you did something that you thought was between you and a friend and it went public where you were tried, judged and convicted to the entire world. She went public saying that they made a sexist remark (possibly against her) and she could be sued for saying that. They made a sexual joke and that is completely different. The other remark that was made was "fork a repo" and that is a non sexist, non sexual, completely valid technical term. For publically saying that that was sexist and posting her little tirade is lawsuit material and an untruth. Does an untruth equal slander or defamation?

dave
dave

My wife has been on the receiving end, both over the counter and on the phone, of verbal abuse from other women. Crap that could get a guy into a lot of trouble if he did it. My wife has also witnessed this happening to other women. I have gone back into stores or phoned a woman back to deal with a situation that my wife couldn't get past another woman and an attitude. I (and most guys) rarely run into a problem even with dealing with the same woman. Why? And why don't they try the same verbal mind games? Women can use language as a weapon the same way guys use their fists. Guys don't play the verbal games as well as women do and usually plough through things no matter what and with little regards to feelings. Most mouthy women know this and usually don't try to play those same games. I don't understand this "no woman is going to tell me anything" or "I'm going to scratch her eyes out" attitude that many (NOT all) women have towards other women. Guys don't do this to guys.

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

some government race/ethnicity pimp will see this and go "Hmmm", then the "fun" will begin. You should read "All the Last Wars At Once" where humanity is divided into every conceivable category and fighting each other. Your other points are on the mark.

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

like the SNL skit Nick Burns, the company computer guy? Hilarious, if a bit stereotypical.

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

That also makes the case for why putting women into combat is a bad idea. They are life givers, not life takers.

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

we need more H1B visas to import more foreign (cheap) labor for IT. Insane.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

I think female dominated careers are no different with men in them though. I've worked in environments that where males were a real minority in the office. Having been a mechanic, I've hear all the male humour and it pales in contrast to what women joked about at work. I mean, the really cringeworthy, personal stuff women share that men don't. Comments I've heard women say toward men, who visited the office or were seen outside the window, made 'shop talk' in the garage seem innocent. It's the same with strippers. Most women HATE the thought of their man going to a strip club, not believing that if you even rest an elbow on the stage you'll have some mammoth literally throwing you out the door. When you see what women get up to around male strippers, it all makes sense though. A friend of mine is a Chippendale, I've been to a few of his gigs and it shocked the hell out of me the first time I saw women climb on stage and grope freely, women get to do anything they want to male strippers. I think what happens is women in the workplace (or while having fun) think that men get away with what they do and act as they do, it just isn't so though. Due to fear of lawsuits, men are restricted from acting as freely as women in the same situations. The two sides are VERY different.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

Most men don't want anything to do with IT either. It's a specialist trade, well it WAS a specialist trade, now it's about as common as graduating from grade school, and in a heavily inundated field where the unique factor has been lost, I think that if women WANT to enter any workforce, they should be just as entitled to as men and should face the same scrutiny as an applicant as men, just no more or less. Like women who become mechanics, they learn to go with the flow when it comes to testosterone filled humour at the workplace.

bratwizard
bratwizard

I agree. I have also seen it and so has my own wife. She's a programmer (20+ years) in a number of very large companies, and has expressed similar sentiments.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

by the money that controls the puppet strings.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

The last election I ran the numbers on (2010) in SC, I think about 55% of voters selected either D or R, and it was almost evenly split along party lines. As for the on-line tools, too many people appear to consider the self-proclaimed news networks as "on line resources".

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

unfortunately. They need to be reminded for whom they work (that would be us, the voters, not just some lobbyist with tons of money who is probably not in that Rep's or Senator's district). Given the largely ignorant and blind party-line voting done by most "voters" there is a fat chance of that happening. I think most of them just close their eyes and pick a candidate during the primary (if they vote at all in the primary) and then pick their favorite party in the general. If I'm dissatisfied with my current Congress-critter, I will look at the alternatives in the primary and vote accordingly. With all the online tools available today, there is no excuse for making an uninformed choice.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

If they put the country first, the money stops. And they know that even though their owners can't (for the most part) vote for them, they have a 90% or better chance of being re-elected if they run. If you're the one there and looking for job security, it's probably the best thing for you to do. Not so good for the idjits that voted for you, though...or the country.

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

and brain-dead that they can't put the country first (for once)? This goes for Republicans as well as Democrats.