Disaster Recovery

Five backup and disaster recovery tools you might have missed

With incidents of data disasters on an exponential upswing, the business world is in desperate need of affordable, effective and secure data protection, backup and recovery. Here are a few to consider.

Backup and disaster recover (BDR) is on everyone's minds these days. Why? Because web security is among the most pressing concerns for companies that store and manage data online. With incidents of data disasters on an exponential upswing, the business world is in desperate need of affordable, effective and secure data protection, backup and recovery.

The importance of data recovery

The business in search of just the right solution has about as many options in BDR solutions as there are flavors of UNIX, but not all are created equal and each offers unique value. Some services offer high levels of backup capabilities, but fall short in the recovery department. Recovery is the operative word here. In other words, when a data disaster strikes, it's all well and good to back up the data, but the recovery time is crucial to maintain a high level of business continuity. Below we've featured some BDR providers you might have missed.

Five BDR tools for you to consider

1.Autonomy - Autonomy (an HP company) lauds itself as a one-stop-shop for all data backup needs. They focus on meaning-based solutions for governance, computing and marketing and provide everything from secure online backup to data recovery and disaster recovery services. What's more, they provide these services for data-centric companies positioned all over the globe.

The company's services can be used to backup large virtualized environments and, through the use of continuous backup, can provide point-in-time recovery. Autonomy's LiveVault service features fully automated BDR, rapid recovery (DeltaRestore), optional onsite TurboRestore Appliance, proactive administration, Data Shuttle Service for large data restores, native data de-duplication and encryption key escrow.

2. StorageCraft - StorageCraft is a rapidly growing Utah-based data backup, disaster recovery and complex data management firm. With dedicated desktop, server and virtual server products, StorageCraft eschews flexibility in favor of concentration. These discrete systems are geared toward whatever you might need, up to a specialized cloud image manager and an IT edition on a USB drive, giving IT professionals a suite of tools immediately available wherever they are. Get in the zone and fly through recovery. 3. Flux Data Services - While Flux Data Services is small potatoes compared to other BDR providers, it offers a wide range of powerful backup capabilities at a much lower price point. This service is generally better for small to mid-sized companies looking to bolster their data security by moving to an online backup solution. For $1 a month, businesses can backup 2GB of their accounting files, making it a low-cost, highly targeted service for businesses. Flux also offers advanced data recovery services, in case you find yourself without a proper backup of your critical files. 4. CA Technologies - CA's ARCserve Replication software is flexible enough that it can handle pretty much anything you throw at it. It supports physical and virtual servers, Windows, Linux, UNIX, DAS, NAS and SANs. Plus, it includes a dedicated physical-to-virtual server migration tool, helping you make the transition to the cloud.

The folks at CA Technologies are offering a rebate for customers that ‘trade up' to their online backup system. Until December 31st, any customer who upgrades from a competitor's online backup provider to their BDR system will receive a rebate of $700 per license or up to $15,000 per order.

5. VirtaCore Systems - VirtaCore Systems is an enterprise-class backup and disaster recovery provider powered by the popular cloud-based BDR firm Asigra. The platform utilizes VMware, Cisco and Google cloud computing tools to deliver powerful backup solutions in the cloud. Virtacore's Cloud Backup service is, predictably, geared mostly toward backing up cloud platforms. With cross-platform support and local or remote recovery options for public, private and hybrid clouds, if you have a cloud system, VirtaCore is a pretty good option.

Finding the right solution for your needs

When shopping for a new online data backup or disaster recovery solution, it's important to consider the firm's reputation in the space. Some providers promise you the moon with so-called guaranteed uptime and lightning fast data recovery speeds. Before settling on a service, check out the firm's record in handling actual catastrophes, perhaps by asking other businesses or through a search of customer narratives. The bottom line is that you can't afford to bank your business on a backup service that won't deliver. Be smart about this one. Your business depends on it.

6 comments
backup02
backup02

Not sure why online backup services that also offers data recovery by file, folder, database, whole computer, etc. that service providers such as http://www.soteriabackup.co.za provides are not mentioned here?

gechurch
gechurch

Flux sounded interesting to me so I checked it out. What on earth made you suggest them? They are clearly a very small nan-and-pop computer store. They do virus removal, custom-built PCs etc. They also do unlimited space and bandwidth web hosting which suggests to me they're running it off a single PC or server in their office (their Facebook page shows this went down earlier this year when there was a problem with their ISP). Along with that they claim to do IT consulting, web site design, graphic design, application development as well as the data services. Given they've got no example web sites or graphic designs (heck, their own logo looks to be Wordart!) I tend not to believe they are as big as they claim. I can't see any reason to trust these guys with backing up my accounting files. I'd be almost 100% confident the backup would be to a single machine, probably just a desktop PC, sitting in their office. Why on earth would I pay $1/month for that instead of using Dropbox? Am I off-the-mark here? I don't mean to be critical (because overall I think the quality of TechRepublic articles is very good), but unless the author has more details than I could find that show these guys really are trustworthy and have proper infrastructure then I think Flux has to be removed as a recommendation. Edit: I just found the address for Flux and looked at it using Google Maps Street View expecting to see a small store. I was wrong - there's nothing there at all. From what I can tell it looks like this "disaster recovery" company is run out of this guys trailer-home.

csu-tfoschini2
csu-tfoschini2

After recent connectivity problems with our virtual servers hosted with VirtaCore VA data center, I can't support your recommendation and I would like to issue a strong caution others. Our connectivity issues with random periods of excessive packet loss lasted more than 1 week and their support / follow-up was abysmal. To date our issues is ongoing.

Adelejukerberg
Adelejukerberg

Most of the companies promise to recover data, but we should be aware that data can only be recovered if it is not overwritten. Once data is [b]overwritten[/b] by any other data, it [b]can not be recovered [/b]by any data recovery method. So before buying any data recovery software, we must check the preview of the recoverable data. If required data is shown by the software only then it is recoverable. We should opt for such product which shows the preview of the recoverable data in the free version.

dlovep
dlovep

never heard of this company nor any products from them....

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

If however it read [i]but we should be aware that data can only be easily recovered if it is not overwritten.[/I] Any Forensic Recovery Application is capable of recovering Overwritten Data but it's no where near as easy or fast as a straight Data Recovery process and most likely will prove to be uneconomical. However saying that I have seen HDD's which where deliberately wiped with a DOD Spec Wiping Utility in an attempt to protect the user from Legal Action which have been recovered and used in evidence in Court Action. Places like Kroll Ontrack can do this which involved removing the platters coating them in a special Coating and then reading the data directly off them in a special machine. Most Courts have a Specialist Recovery Company who can do this for them and their recovery can not be questioned. For that matter On Track managed to recover data off a HDD which was onboard Colombia when it suffered the failure of the airframe. The drive was recovered severely scorched at the bottom of a swamp about 6 months after the crash and all of the data on the drive was recovered. While that was not a case of the drive being overwritten it was what most people would think of as unrecoverable. ;) Col