Bring Your Own Device

Five consumerization of IT myths debunked, maybe

With all the breathless coverage of the consumerization trend sweeping enterprise, it's easy to forget that even the trend is changing, too.

According to a recent analyst report from Avanade -- and its below infographic -- there are several myths IT should watch out for so far as consumerization of IT goes.

These myths fly in the face of what's generally accepted regarding the explosive IT trend -- where increasing amounts of users risk security and challenge policy by bringing in personal devices and services.

Most surveys show IT is behind the eight ball. Not ready. Panicking, even. Avadade, in its survey of 600 IT and C-level information execs, claims it discovered otherwise.

Here's Myth No. 1 -- that IT is resisting consumerization. Hmm. In fact, analysts say, IT is embracing it. Despite perceptions that companies and IT leaders are hesitant to embrace the consumerization of IT, Avanade’s global survey found companies are in fact embracing the change and it is executives at the highest levels in the organization leading the charge," said analysts who penned the reporter.

in case you don't speak analyst lingo, that's your CEO forcing his own iPad in, ruining the RIM only policy you might once have had. Bet some of you've seen that.

Myth number two, says Avanade, is that "companies don’t Have the IT resources they need to

manage the consumerization of IT." Fact is, the report claims, that of the 600 plus IT and C-level staff surveyed "91 percent of C-level executives and 75 percent of IT decision makers said their IT department today has the staff and resources needed to manage the use of consumer technologies. Further, the majority of IT decision makers (62 percent) and C-level executives (84 percent) say it is a relatively simple matter to integrate the employee-owned devices, applications and online services into the enterprise IT system."

Really? Is this true for your enterprise. Finally, here are the firm's COIT myths three -- that millennials are driving the trend, four, that users just employ their personal devices to trade cows or show gifs on personal networks and, five, that Apple=COIT.

Android, say the analysts, has already eclipsed Apple in the enterprise in terms of sheer numbers of devices. The consumerization of IT, while perhaps more palatable to IT than previously thought, sure takes some intriguing twists and turns. Stay tuned.

About

Gina Smith is a NYT best-selling author of iWOZ, the biography of Steve Wozniak. She is a vet tech journalist and chief of the geek tech site, aNewDomain.net.

9 comments
EnterpriseITGuy
EnterpriseITGuy

After reading so many of Galen Gruman (http://www.cio.com/author/41292/Galen+Gruman) articles that claim IT is antiquated and a big roadblock to the adoption of consumerization of IT initiatives, it is refreshing to see a report that reflects the reality I see both in my organization and in others I associate with. My organization has embraced COIT in a measured context - where it adds business value, BYOD limited to system on a chip devices, IT evaluation of apps and cloud offerings, etc - and my team has lead the software/OS side of the equation. IT gets it, supports it and enables it - and this study reflects that state. Nice to see.

SampeiMihira
SampeiMihira

My company belongs to an italian international group, and our IT department has not the technical (in primis...bandwidth, then also ip address free space accross LAN) resources to integrate employees owned devices, nor we have the human resources to manage all the additional security risks...Employees want to make private phone calls by voip using LAN ISP and many more unuseful thing for the company...and call the IT helpdesk also for these reasons...I absolutely disagree with the result of this research or survey, but I'm sure in other situations or environment things may be different.

durocshark
durocshark

Sounds like most of those surveyed fall into the Pointy Haired Boss category.

don.maxwell
don.maxwell

"the majority of IT decision makers (62 percent) and C-level executives (84 percent) say it is a relatively simple matter to integrate the employee-owned devices, applications and online services into the enterprise IT system.??? This statement suggests to me that either many executives are sitting in their ivory towers and out of touch with what is really happening in their own organizations or there is some sort of flaw in Avanade's survey.

Justin James
Justin James

... groups like Gartner and the one cited here are so universally mocked by anyone who does "actual work", they survey so-called "leadership" people about what they *plan* to do in the near future, and conveniently ignore what real workers are *actually doing* or have *actually done*. Seeing as the generally acknowledged rate for IT project failure is around 70%, asking people "what do you plan to do in the next 12 months?" and then making IT decisions based on it is about as meaningful, accurate, and useful as looking in the farmer's almanac to determine what the weather will be 365 days from now and planning an outdoor event around it. J.Ja

SPGuest
SPGuest

Next they will report that any chance of COIT being a security issue has been fixed by outsourcing all security management to a middle eastern company who underbid the expert firm they were using from China.

Magic_8_Ball
Magic_8_Ball

In a recent twist of this ???simple matter to integrate??? thought in action, one decision maker announced to staff members that IT will handle questions regarding their consumer devices without defining a policy. The result was IT group getting buried by user requests related to non-standard products from tablets to low-end wireless routers. This left IT to create a defacto policy of only looking at devices used for work, at work. Even in those cases, work was only done to integrate the device with the work environment. The user is responsible for the maintenance and troubleshooting if there is an actual issue with the device outside of the work necessary elements. As Don indicated, the ivory tower decision maker failed to examine the organization and staff before making this decision. Rather than making a blanket announcement, specifics should have been given. But in a way, the decision had political merit in that it made IT the bad guy and the decision maker look like a forward thinking manager.

dan.sandel
dan.sandel

Don, you are 100% correct that the executives are out of touch.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

Yes, Mossad has decided to branch out, now that the US interventions have made the middle east safe and stable :^0