Leadership

Five warning signs of becoming a corporate maniac

Corporate maniacs can make life intolerable. Many of these leaders don't even know they're acting like one. Is it possible that you're a corporate maniac? Leadership coach John M McKee provides five warning signs to look out for.
Motivational Deficiency Disorder - A condition characterized by extreme laziness identified by Australian neurologist Leth Argos and documented in the British Medical Journal in 2006. The report said the condition, designated as MoDeD, may affect up to 1 in 5 people. It is characterized by an overwhelming and debilitating apathy.

The above turned out to be a spoof. Too bad. It might have been a great new opportunity for anyone wanting to get out of the office; and there's no shortage of those individuals who enjoy booking-off.

On the other hand, there really are a lot of people who suffer from the opposite of "MoDeD." They're the ones who arrive in the office or appear online before anyone else everyday, and also the last ones to sign-off or head home at the end of the day. This malady, as we all know by now, is called being a workaholic. It's bad enough when one of your peers has it, and it can be particularly damaging when the boss is afflicted. In those cases, (s)he may become dysfunctional, making bad decisions and negatively impacting the entire organization. Additionally, the leader may create a sick culture. I'm talking about those places where everyone works long hours, often without taking their vacation time. When you step into one of those environments, there's a real flat feeling. Very little creativity occurs and workers don't interact positively in many cases.

In his book, Supercapitalism, University of California at Berkeley prof Robert Reich noted that most Americans are struggling to keep up professionally. His advice to leaders was to keep reminding themselves that the quality of work is much more important than the quantity. He asked this question: "Can we change the rules.. to give people better odds of having a whole life...?"

How can you tell if you're a corporate maniac?

As an executive and leadership coach, my position on this question is, "I'm not sure." Despite ample research and evidence, many team leaders just don't seem to understand the importance of letting people take time off, even if the company has policies against asking people to forgo vacations or to work long hours. These toughies tell me things like, "If someone can't get the job done in 40 hours a week, then they should take 50." They may smile when they say it, but the message is still very clear.

If you think you may be on the cusp of becoming one of these corporate maniacs, here are a few warning signs to watch out for:

  1. You and your spouse/partner fight about your hours. Remember: it's not what you say that counts. It's your actions.
  2. When one of your team is going on vacation, you "forget." And then you plan an important meeting for the Wednesday of the week she'll be away, causing her to cancel or come in during the break.
  3. Friends and family members quit inviting you to holiday events, dinners out, even birthday parties.
  4. You find it hard to resist calling or texting subordinates while you're in your car, or at home. (Even if you don't have a crisis.) You tell yourself that this is how colleagues act. You actually believe that the person on the other end enjoys keeping in contact with you after hours.
  5. It doesn't seem wrong to come into work when you're sick. After all, you say, you can always take time off later (but you never do).

Others have figured out the "real" you - even if you haven't.

If any of these hit close to home; it's time to ask yourself some serious questions before you're too far gone.

Do you want to continue this way? If not, what's stopping you from changing your habits?

I frequently hear from clients that they "really do want to lighten-up" but they can't because of the job demands. However, in general, that's not the true situation. Often there are others who could take care of things in the absence of the leader, if only he'd let them. If you'd say the same thing, it's time to have an honest discussion with yourself and then either:

  • Accept your style for what it is and be prepared to accept the negative consequences (family, friends, health, quality of life) of being a workaholic.
  • Commit to making a change in your style and outlook. Recruit someone (husband, partner, coach, pal) to help keep you on course when you might waiver.

Because on this point, the research is clear: regardless of their addiction, most addicts can't make big changes all by themselves.

Good Luck.

john

Leadership Coach

If you have a leadership question or need some advice on a leadership topic, email John at enews6@techrepublic.com with "Leadership Coach" as your subject line.

About

John M. McKee is the founder and CEO of BusinessSuccessCoach.net, an international consulting and coaching practice with subscribers in 43 countries. One of the founding senior executives of DIRECTV, his hands-on experience includes leading billion d...

79 comments
mornay.delport
mornay.delport

I'm IT qualified & my dream is to venture into my own business. Where can I get some more advice & direction? I don't really have much experience, but I need to start off somewhere so that this dream of mine can become reality. MD

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

I got tired of putting up with these boneheads.

Techtoo
Techtoo

It is the anti-corporate maniac and anti-workaholic sentiment displaying in this article that leads to the overall decline of the America. What if "Wednesday" is the only chance to schedule that "important" meeting? Do you postpond it because someone is on vacation? I personally think it is OK to email or send SMS during after hours as long as you do not demand immediate responses or actions from the recipients. You simply send them the info as soon as you get it or before you forget it.

M_Ski
M_Ski

Just what we need in our slothful culture... More lazy people. What a great idea!: Let's just allow the productive work to fall to an ever-dwindling number of qualified & motivated people. We'll then criticize those same people for showing up, doing the work, and keeping the ever-growing pool of sloths employed in order to enable them to spend "quality time" with their bastards, etc. I'm sure that plan ends well. Of course, the author's assertions are indisputable. After all, he did quote a Marxist former Secretary of Labor.

SilverBullet
SilverBullet

More likely lacks management skills and subordinates pay the price.

Triathlete1981
Triathlete1981

No one on his deathbed ever said they wished they spent more time at the office. - Arnold Zack I guess it's about priorities. I'm 28, have a successful career already (in charge of my IT dept) but still have a good personal life. My priorities are life first, work second. There's another 28 year old at my job (in charge of manufacturing dept) who puts in 60 hour weeks (8am to 8pm EVERY DAY). He only makes $5K more than me. Hey, keep the $5K (which is probably because he's been here 1 more year than me). I'd rather have some sanity. It's sad that people think those extra hours are actually needed. You want to give it, management will gladly take it. But that's for you, not for me. I have my priorities in order.

Rye5
Rye5

Hmmmmm I've exhibited every behavior described.....I'm a corp manic! Ug Heard somewhere that 1st step to fixing an addiction is to admit the problem. Problem is, where do I find the time ;) Have a great day all.

C F USA
C F USA

I no longer work more than 45 hours a week. That being said, Yes, I was a workaholic to the point where I logged 100 plus hours a week at a previous job. I would be at the office at 7am and sometimes not clock out until 11pm or later. My "Normal" clock times were 7am-7pm 5 days a week, 8am-12p 1 day, on top of that, was on Consult Call 24x7. Thats 64 hours a week. If you take out the 1 hour a day I was supposed to take for lunch, (none on Saturday 8-12) thats still 60 hours a week. The week after I got married I was working from 7am-3am 6 days a week. When I left that job, I also left my prescriptions for acid reflux (was on 2 because 1 just didnt do the job) that my doctor attributed to stress (I kept denying there was an issue.) Now, more than 10 years later, I am still without the acid reflux/heart burn medication unless of course I eat my favorite Jalapenos wrapped in bacon ...mmm... I will NOT put myself, nor my family through that again. I missed a lot, they did too. If I were to drop off the planet tomorrow, the sun will still rise, the winds will still blow, and the job will still be done. I would like to think that the company would struggle without me, but the harsh reality is that it would go on regardless. Food for thought

avatar_man
avatar_man

Sometimes you don't have a choice - short staffed, unrealistic client demands and pressure to maintain the systems plus grow new business and cross train. Unless you can find a new position where you don't have to wear 5 hats, you have to do a lot of these just to survive in todays disposable I.T. culture. Spreadsheet of the moment mentality.

Triathlete1981
Triathlete1981

My boss thinks that everyone should stay late because he stays late, till 8pm consistently. I did that for a few weeks on a particular project and eventually had it out with him. I was snapping at people and very unhappy with life and work. We had a very honest conversation where I said, "The culture around here is that if I don't stay till 7pm every night, I'm not dedicated to my job." His response was, "It's okay for a salaried worker to stay those extra hours." It was like talking to a brick wall, a losing argument. But, actions speak louder than words. Regardless of if he said he needed to speak to me after hours, I said, "Sorry, I have to go" and I left. Did that consistently for a couple weeks, and he got the hint. I put up that boundary and now it's my typical work environment, which is less angry and more enjoyable and productive. And I'm still here and even got a raise this year from that same boss. A lot of people here still buy into that, and they are typically miserable to work with. If you start staying late every day, they're going to expect that all the time. There needs to be boundaries between your work and personal life. Staying after hours invades your personal life, period. If your boss doesn't recognize that, it's time to put those boundaries in place yourself or find new work. If you are consistently staying late every night, you need to do something about it. Not to say, if a server's on fire, you don't need to fix it, but that's the emergency situation. Quality IS better than quantity. I'm not old school and don't buy into the "I have to stay till 8pm every night to show the boss I'm a good worker" b.s. Just because you stay late every night does not mean you have a better work ethic than the person who leaves at 5 every day.

Fregeus
Fregeus

I must be getting old or something. I work 37.5 hours a week. Overtime is possible but very rare. I insist on getting overtime pay. If I go to an interview and they tell me the job is a salary only, I tell then "sorry for bothering you, but I work by the hour only." TCB

TooOldToRemember
TooOldToRemember

that he wanted to promote me to VP but felt that another guy should be promoted first (we work in different areas) because he regularly put in 70-80 hours per week and I don't. While my initial reaction was not pleasant I have not only reconciled myself to not getting the promotion but promised myself I will not "do what it takes" to get it if it means sacrificing myself on the corporate altar 70-80 hours a week. I am now happily married, have hobbies and am starting to exercise enough to feel like I won't croak if I have to climb 3 flights of stairs. I have always been ambitious and made it to the top of my profession several times. But as I have gotten older (and maybe wiser) my priorities and goals have become more personal. I take vacations without my iPhone and leave things to my staff when I am gone. I highly recommend discovering what life outside the office looks like while you have time to do it. The kicker is my boss told me I was the better manager of the two of us. I'm good with that.

mike_patburgess
mike_patburgess

To all who have or will respond to this blog. Every single employee everywhere are "not" human resources. You are all expendable and a necessary nuisance to any business. If a company could conduct it's business without employees it would. That said, there are laws that protect the employee and anyone who works like a slave or in a sweat shop should re-evaluate the job that they are in. Life is too precious to waste on work for works sake.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I have to totally disagree with this statement. It is completely wrong and should be amended to If you can get your allocated work done in 40 hours you don't have enough to do so here is what you really need. I have actually worked in several Places where it proved impossible to take any time off for anything but the most dire Illness. At most places the Owner/CEO or whatever just expected the Workshop to shut down when I was away and do nothing at all. I was the only staff member there and there was no one to take up the work when I was away. The job involved doing routine repairs teaching the dealers how to repair the companies products and general repairs for all products as well as showing new Products to Dealers and training them on how to sell and repair. When I was instructing Dealers there was no one to do the routine work and the Budget wouldn't stretch to hiring someone else to do repair work while I was not there for whatever reason. Well actually the last bit isn't true as I had a very solid argument for more staff but the Accountant who ran the show wouldn't allow me to hire anyone and increase profits because that was going to cost money. And I still dislike Accountants intensely. ;) Col

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

because you are going to take the p1ss out of someone. Especially seeing as it could have been Tuesday, but that was your day off.... All depends on your terms and conditions. You can email or sms me outside of working hours and expect, in fact demand a response unless I've pre-arranged to be out of contact. Going rate was 8% on top of basic salary last time I did that, your choice....

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

If you ask me, the corporate maniac mindset is leading to the downfall of America. Too many people have been too devoted to working and not raising their children. I'm sorry, but IMO there's just no way a child gets the attention, discipline and influence they so desperately need if one or both parents are working more than 60 hours a week consistently. But to each their own. No, it isn't okay to schedule an important meeting if a key member is on a family vacation or taking their child, loved one to a doctor visit. I once got in a shouting match with a former boss at a former job because I took off to take my then wife to a rather run of the mill trip to the obgyn. He scheduled an "important" meeting and told me I had to come, and of course I refused. At this visit, we found out we had lost our baby. Now tell me which would have been more important, canceling a routine checkup where I hypothetically wasn't needed or that work meeting? I could only imagine how horrible it would have been for her to endure that alone had I have chosen that meeting instead. Can you send emails after hours? Certainly! You're welcome to it, just don't expect team mates to respond as that is their choice and not yours. Work should never come before our loved ones, period. You can get enough work done in 40-50 hours if things are done properly. If not, then you need to examine what you can do to fix it or search for a new job. Our friends and family love us, not our company.

OurITLady
OurITLady

Sorry folks, it's a country tune and I know that may out some people off, but the lyrics say "you can't buy back the moments that matter". Says it all really, once you have enough money to keep a roof over your head and food on the table it's time to assess the real priorities and that should ALWAYS be family and friends. I have no children, but I have no problem at all when my colleagues say they won't be in because they have a kids birthday, dentist or doctors visit, school recital, or whatever - my parents did it for me and I would expect no less of any parent.

C F USA
C F USA

Productive members of society are always needed. I agree we should ALL work, what I am saying is that you need to balance the time between work and family. You mentioned the OP quoting a Marxist former Secretary of Labor...Speaking of quotes, you said : "We'll then criticize those same people for showing up, doing the work, and keeping the ever-growing pool of sloths employed in order to enable them to spend "quality time" with their bastards, etc" I will not criticize those folks who show up, do the work. I will criticize the "pool of sloths". As far as people spending time with their "bastards", you, in my opinion, need to calm down,take a breath, think about what you are saying. I will criticize YOU for your assumptious attitude about what people do in their off time and calling their children "bastards" That is uncalled for. Praise the workers who work, and nail the ones who don't, but do NOT drag family into it.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

So those of us that don't work 60 hours a week are sloths? Choosing to take the time to be a father or husband or wife or mother as opposed to sacrificing one's life on the company is a bad thing? Sorry, but I have better things to do with my life, like living it. Motivation has absolutely zilch to do with the amount of hours you spend working.

ssampier
ssampier

You are my inspiration. I am 28 years old, too. I don't have my own department though. I try to keep my hours average in the 42.5 hour range. Occasionally I will stay longer or come in on weekends for special projects. It is quality, not quantity that counts. I do also take vacations; one week in the summer and one week in the

TooOldToRemember
TooOldToRemember

I think it is great you have a grip on those things that are important to you and still have a position where you lead. Often it is not the case. Now you get a chance to be the example for others under you. There are some of us out there that were able to find our way out of the office without having the physical and emotional results of working ourselves near exhaustion. But often it was some manager that set an example that working while you are at work, resting/enjoying the time when you are not and knowing the difference between them leads to happier, longer term employment. Kinda like give a guy a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a guy to fish and you give him a reason to leave work at the end of the day...

a.barry
a.barry

Did you sleep in the office? or did you work from home? I really hope you didn't get on the road. I once did a week of 8am (meeting) to 1am (go home) and showed serious signs of sleep deprivation (which also meant my productivity was shot). Luckily for my fellow drivers my commute was 5 minutes, and there was virtually no traffic when I left.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

I have a different rule. If you want me to do more, pay me more. If you don't want to pay me, you don't really want me to do it. I've done the multiple hats bit, I also put in a lot of extra time (not counting an extra 1/2 hour) to make sure I'd didn't get called out, got paid for every one of them too. That's the deal they can take it or leave it. What you are doing is a choice, it could be that or no job, don't expect putting load of hours in to get you a promotion though. After all you are good value where you are if you do the work of five people for one salary....

JackOfAllTech
JackOfAllTech

I wear a lot of hats, somewhate more than 5, but I don't let myself get cornered into that trap. I tell people up front that this is how it is. If they don't like it, I'm happy to let them go somewhere else. You know what? In almost 30 years, I've never missed a meal, or a date with my wife, or a birthday party, or a bill, or.... What I have missed is a heart attack or stroke, the stress of 'just one more dollar' If you want to be a masochist and die early, more power to you but don't try to make out that that's normal.

a.barry
a.barry

I was once in a "go/no-go" sales conference. A client wanted to use our database operationally and updates HAD to be finished by 8am. I said that our update process could handle it PROVIDED they had a dedicated server, AND a dedicated overnight person who was trained in the update process (rather than "red light - pick up the phone") since there was no time for phone tag. We signed the client, and after missing a few SLA's they got their own server. The "dedicated overnight person" never happened, or at least that person never got paid.

tbmay
tbmay

...generally agree with you there are plenty of places that would not allow you to establish that barrier without consequences. Sometimes those consequences aren't immediate. It boils down to two things. 1. The legitimate need to keep up in what has become a perceived disposable industry. 2. This may be a bigger one than the first one....the generation of employees, managers, etc that are currently in the workplace, as well as the ones who will enter it, seem to me to be more self absorbed than the generations before us. They actually believe they have a right to expect employees to be more committed to THEIR (the managers') personal and professional development than they are even to their own families. It's a form of narcissism masquerading as "looking out for the company." Trust me, most of these people want you to look out for THEM at the expense of the company if necessary. When you're pulling 80 hours a week consistently for no extra pay, and your manager acts like you OWE IT TO HIM OR HER, you're working for such a person. Unfortunately I don't see this situation getting any better in years to come. I've had a good look at the next generation of employees and they're even more spoiled than we were. Real leadership is in short supply in established organization these days.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

Provided it is an employer that will let me use the time on a regular basis. Heavan knows I need lots of leave time shuttling my son to specialist appointments due to asthma and allergy, I've been known to burn up some sick leave! Plus time means more to me than that OT pay anywho. :)

avatar_man
avatar_man

..that you would not be able to get the VP job done in less than 70-80 hours a week? Time does not equal results in this equation. I have seen really stupid people at the VP level put in all kinds of hours, chew through resources and meetings and still come out with the worst decisions possible. Maybe the reason 70-80 hours a week is needed, is BECAUSE they won't promote he right person?

trapper
trapper

I was passed over for promotion last year in favor of outside hire with no direct experience in our field. After six months of spending 20+ more hours/week in the office he upbraided us in a staff meeting for not spending more time on the job. Maybe with 15 years experience I didn't need 60 hours a week to do a job he still didn't understand? On the other hand, the hiring was done by another junior to me, so is this work mania or simple age discrimination?

Richaz
Richaz

The guys who are work 70-80 hours a week consistently are most likely not producing good results. Eventually it catches up to them. To work that many hours means their personal life is not good and they are not a happy person. How can someone like that be in a leadership role? Promotions should be done on a results and how good of a manager they are. Sounds like your boss doing the promoting is missing it too?

snowflake
snowflake

Let that company "die".... This "crisis" was terribly good for selecting the cheapa$$ and goodfornothing companies and poushing them under the ground. Yeah there were and still are collateral victims, but in the long run anybody with "knowledge" will get better opportunities.

mcdermidh
mcdermidh

Heaven forbid anything happened to any of us we would be replaced before the earth had settled.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

Some states however, are a "right to work" state. That pretty much means there are no applicable laws in regards to your work load or hours. The only exceptions in those states are if you are endangering yourself or others, such as working long hours around hazmat or working too many hours in a job that requires driving.

JackOfAllTech
JackOfAllTech

What absolutely fabulous reward did you get for sacrificing yourself? I can't think of anything that would be worth it.

a.barry
a.barry

It's amazing how "normal business hours" seem to have gone out of the window. I've seen project plans where a "3 day task" started on a Friday and ended on a Monday. I'm also getting used to being called at all hours, and had a friend who was written up for being "unreachable" - on a weekend (and she was not told to be on call, it was assumed).

snowflake
snowflake

"Get a life". :) This is one of the greatest advices I ever heard or gave.

a.barry
a.barry

I was lucky enough to have a manager like that once. Unfortunately managers seem to be rated more on their teams output than on their teams well being, with the result that "caring" managers become extinct and whip-crackers become the norm. Perhaps managers should be elected.

C F USA
C F USA

I really wish I could have slept at the office at times. Unfortunately I couldn't. There were times I did have to drive as part of the job. I was in charge of installers/service people and had to venture out and solve problems/issues. I did my very best not to drive working those long hours, and home was only about 5 minutes away, but still we all know what can happen in that short distance. I was known to take a cab at times, just to avoid any accidents to myself or others.

C F USA
C F USA

Not defending the action, but I have seen someone hire a 25 y/o with 2 years experience for half the salary of someone who had been on the job for 25 years... The reason? Economics. They could get someone fresh with the same "book knowledge" for 1/2 the price and didnt have to worry about the future raises the Senior Employee had. Not only that, they could pretty much change "policy" with a new hire. Only problem with that..."book knowledge" can not take the place of practical knowledge. The book tells you precautions on how not to get shocked because in the real world a breaker would be turned off. In the the real world, a little nip of 120v will make sure you check the breaker and lock it down yourself.

gandolfo
gandolfo

"The guys who are work 70-80 hours a week consistently are most likely not producing good results" "I?m talking about those places where everyone works long hours, often without taking their vacation time. When you step into one of those environments, there?s a real flat feeling. Very little creativity occurs and workers don?t interact positively in many cases." (original article) Unproven generalizations from a sour grapes attitude. Maybe 70 hours of reasonable expected work is what is needed, not 20 hours of genius. That's what medical interns work in Germany (there's lots of pressure to reduce it to normal but ...). Or always on duty when you run your own bed&breakfast, mom&pop store, or online service. Were you once a student working those hours on a thesis? Get real. It's not the hours worked that count, but the relaxation and quality of your free time for yourself and others near you. After years of long hours working on my career, I scaled back and now work 80% and enjoy the free time. But hard work at the start paid off.

a.barry
a.barry

Being a VP is not an award - it's a fairly critical position requiring very specific skills. One of those skills is leadership, which also requires delegation. A person working 70-80 hours probably isn't delegating much.

C F USA
C F USA

the saying around the place I used to work was if you fell that your wallet will be gone and you will be fired, both before you hit the floor

avatar_man
avatar_man

It's pretty much been that way since the mid 1990's from my perspective. I.T. has been mutated from a professional career (still kept that way to abuse the FLSA regulations for no overtime for Salary Exempt) to one looked at as a "Service Industry". Standard take: "You can't provide the service cheaper all the time and immediately, we will outsource to somone else." This means you are tied to work 24x7, 365 sometimes.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

The normal business hours are still 40 hours. Hasn't changed, period. The amount of time outside of that we allow ourselves to work has changed. Too many people are willing to take a 60 hour work week as "part of the job" and not complain about it. I'll whine, complain and moan about it in a proper fashion to management when it happens to me. Guess what? While some may view me as an undedicated whiner since I refuse to work outside of 50+ hours on a regular basis, I still get raises, promotions and I've yet to be fired in my career. I've been in what escalated to shouting matches over it with managers before because of my refusal to back down on this stance. My coworkers at the time kept advising me it was foolish or I should back down and just "work the job" like they did. My raises were always slightly above theirs. My personal well being is worth more than what anyone can afford to pay me. Even if it is my baby, my project that I started and I am overseeing....you absolutely will not catch me working 60 hours period. 50 is my acceptable max. I may make the occasional exception to complete a project I may have started, but you can bet your life I will take the entire following week off. If you want me on call, it better be in my contract or I will be speaking to legal and hr about if it gets taken so far as me being written up. If that doesn't work, it is time for a job change.

snowflake
snowflake

Is good. :) As long as it gives you more time for your own, personal life.

C F USA
C F USA

for you, then power to you. Best shifts I ever worked are tied. Either 4 9's and a 4, or 4 10's But hey, what works for you is what matters

snowflake
snowflake

Was 24/24/24/48 meaning 24 hrs in work, 24 hrs free, then 24 hrs in work again then 48 hours free. Now that was something I wish I was still doing. OK, the work was underpaid, but the shift was awesome :)

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I had the [b]Pager[/b] in 1974. I did learn to hate the things too not to mention that it carried over to Cell Phones. ;) Col

snowflake
snowflake

corporate Blackberry. When they expect you to answer way beyond you allotted work hours..

snowflake
snowflake

F.em... It's a false idea that there are other ppl, who do it instead of you. Yeah, IF quality, and/or responsible work doesn't matter, there are other ppl - but for honest "service slaves" there is always something which we can pick - AND pleases. When I decided I will.not.die because of overload and/or heart attack, I was afraid I made the wrong choice. Almost 20 years later I still feel I was right.

PMO Weasel
PMO Weasel

I do recall the days of getting paid extra to carry a pager. Those days are long gone, I think. The last job I started, I had a pager my second day there, but it took till the end of the week to get a phone on my desk, and two weeks for an email account. In hindsight, I should have run.....

a.barry
a.barry

Ironically this seems to correspond to the evolution of cell phones, and the point when they became affordable to the masses. Before that you had pagers. There was "the pager", and you were on call when you had "the pager" and off the hook when you didn't. In some cases you were paid for having "the pager", other times you could trade "pager duty" for free time. Since reaching someone on a land-line was unpredictable, nobody would would run a business based on "someone who happened to be near a phone", and instead would have people scheduled to work off-hours - usually people who had the ability to solve most problems without picking up the phone.

C F USA
C F USA

especially on the health and personal life (see my comment below) its simply not worth it. I don't mind helping, I don't mind leading, but I do mind killing myself to save a buck or two. If they can't afford to hire someone else for a temp issue, sure, I will and have stepped to the plate and been rewarded for it. But have not had to sacrifice 20 hours over the norm to do it. If its that important, they will let someone else handle what I normally do so I can focus on that particular project, not work myself to an early grave I am not perfect, I am not the gifted one, and I am not indispensible. This I know.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

Contract, policy or whatever. Sooner or later you signed something with your job description on it. :) My point is the employer only abuses you as long as you let them. If there is no way around working 60 hours a week then your employer doesn't care about you and is treating you as an expendable resource. Why on earth would anyone show any dedication to a company that treats them like that? At that point it is time to actively seek other employment. If you can't find any, then it is time for a career change. 60 hours a week is unacceptable and unhealthy. Given enough (and not very much time at that)time your health deteriorates and your personal life suffers. Those around you will distance themselves, spouses included. It isn't their fault. I don't care to be married to or even friends with someone who devotes the majority of their waking life to a job. What time would be leftover for me? You can't be an active part of a child's life working 60 hours a week. Fact is, no one is indispensable so exactly what good does all that ot accomplish?

a.barry
a.barry

How many people actually have a contract?