CXO

Got a BYOD horror story? Share it with us.

Did your organization pull a boner when trying to manage employee mobile devices? If so, we'd like to hear about it.

Even if your organization hasn't formally adopted a BYOD approach to technology, you know that trying to control the proliferation of employee-owned devices in the workplace is challenging.

Formal BYOD approaches require a lot of work beforehand and a commitment to policy creation and security. Some companies take this lightly and find themselves unprepared for security breaches. If your organization was one of these, we'd like to hear from you.

You can keep the name of the organization private but we'd like to hear some "horror" stories that resulted from BYOD mismanagement, along with some lessons you learned in hindsight and how you would do things differently. It's our goal to provide best practices for our audience and this is one of the best ways we can do that. If we feature your story in the piece, we'll send you a TechRepublic coffee mug.

Please send your stories to me at toni.bowers@cbsinteractive.com.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

4 comments
Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

Like the exec who brought his own wireless router and wireless dongle in so he could move his desk across the room where there was no network outlet. And thus compromised a high security network because he didn't know how to even do the basic securing of the network and it was now open to the world. Or the General's aide (read executive / personal assistant) who entered all the phone numbers he regular rang into the memory of his mobile phone so he didn't have to carry around the book with them in them. When he lost the phone 27 unlisted phone numbers had to be changed and a few hundred people informed of the fact. The guy's personnel file was marked 'not suitable for promotion,' a real career killing move that one. Then there was the guy who used his own notebook to do work stuff as it was more convenient and he wasn't authorised for a work issue one. Two years later he left the company but no one thought to check his notebook as no one knew he had been using it for work. The information came to light eighteen months later when confidential data on the notebook was revealed as still on the hard drive by the person who bought the second hand notebook from him and checked the drive out before cleaning it. All these are pre BYOD days and BYOD policies, but they are the sorts of issues BYOD will see on the increase.

greg.dargiewicz
greg.dargiewicz

I would have thought the idea of supporting BYOD would be all the horror story most businesses need.

jeb.hoge
jeb.hoge

I was the test subject for the BYOD software/process on a rooted, non-standard ROM Android phone. Software worked OK but when the time came to end the test, for whatever reason, the device management software wouldn't fully uninstall. I ended up re-flashing the ROM and rebuilding my setup in order to get back to normal.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

You don't have any horror stories when you haven't let the new age axe murder into the old mansion.