IT Employment

IT managers: Prepare for the millennials!

The millenials, the generation of workers born roughly between 1977 and 1995, also known as Generation Y, who represent the biggest shift in the U.S. workforce since the baby boomers came of age. Learn how to prepare as a manager for their unique perspectives.

No, not the millennium. That's over and done with. I'm talking about the millennials, the generation of workers born roughly between 1977 and 1995, also known as Generation Y, who represent the biggest shift in the U.S. workforce since the baby boomers came of age.

According to BNET, they are eighty-million strong, and will soon account for the majority of American workers, especially as boomers start to retire. As Andrew Tilin writes in his 7-part series, Managing Millennials: A BNET Survival Guide, this generation will be forcing a cultural shift on companies and managers.

So what kind of change? According to Tilin:

These workers are change agents who may force you to rethink and improve your methods of recruiting, training, and management - the lifeblood elements of your company. They're accustomed to working away from their desks, using everything from library computers to smartphones and laptops. They got intense and individualized mentoring from teachers and coaches, and they were never told that their elders should intimidate them. "The world is a flat hierarchy to these kids," says Peter Johnson, director of admissions at the University of California at Berkeley's Haas School of Business. "Whether you think it's a good or bad thing doesn't really matter. It's a market condition."

Many companies have realized they need to change with the times: UPS has begun to abandon its training manuals for hands-on learning in staged neighborhoods; Deloitte empowers its middle managers to offer flexible scheduling to their team members, and Google bypasses corporate hierarchy by making its brightest new millennials managers and granting them direct access to the company's co-founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brin.

Take a look at the series to learn how to attract and hire the best and brightest millennials, how to close the generation gap, and how to wrangle a few of the more common under-30 personality types.

[Editorial note: This piece originally posted with a typo. The millennials are Generation Y not X. It's was a typo, not an unfamiliarity with the facts.]

Bottom line for IT leaders

The millennials are heading into the work force. Be prepared for some of the drawbacks they may bring, as well as to be able to appreciate the positive changes they will force.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

166 comments
Eugene.Miller
Eugene.Miller

The popular TV sitcom "The Office" features a character who seems to personify the "Millenial" employee. He's ambitious, but clueless and ultimately useless. He's the equivalent of vaporware, the term once used for dotcom software that was all hype and no substance. So, are the millenials the vanguard of future IT workforce ... or ... are they doomed to low-wage temp work? Will they change the system or will they drop-out and subsist on their trust-funds?

historybuff67
historybuff67

She's mixing groups here. Gen X, formerly known as the Baby Bust, were born between 1964 and 1976. Gen Y is the group born between 1977 and 1997, sometimes referred to as Millenials or the Echo Boom. As the Boomers retire, the people in management positions will be Gen X, not the Millenials and, while smaller than the Millenial group, will be the largest employed segment for a short time. Consider that the youngest of the Millenials is now 11 years old, not part of the employee pool just yet.

GiMMeABreak
GiMMeABreak

So what are the ones born after '97? Gen Z? And after them what? Gen A? Gen AA?

ke_xtian
ke_xtian

This is all bull. My wife and I reared 3 sons. The oldest was born in 1977 and the youngest in 1984. All three have degrees from major universities which for which they earned the lion's share of the cost through a combination of academic scholarships and work. They all made great grades and are now all self-supporting. They don't fit the mold. I know a lot of millenials who don't fit the mold. In fact, I don't know any millenials who fit the mold.

GiMMeABreak
GiMMeABreak

You DO realise these are GENERALISATIONS right? No-one is saying all Gen Ys are lazy, good-for-nothings, want-everything-handed-to-them-on-a-platter, etc.

me
me

Thank you mate, well said.

No User
No User

Think about it the folks at the tail end of the baby boomer generation and those in between that and the Xers or Gen X are the first generation to have absolutely no fear of being obsoleted and or replaced by the younger generations. They come with far to much over head, hang ups, needs and a general lack of productivity to be a viable alternative to us. They need perpetual hand holding and training and still need to ask WHY and hugged and told everything will be OK. They come at to high a price and with the way basic necessities like housing has gone up and shall continue they need far to much to pay their way. That and the fact that they are whimsical and move on quickly and often it makes absolutely no sense to spend money and time to train and develop them. We will have a job as long as we want to work. We shall be sought after when we are in rest homes. We just get it done dot period!!! In fact we may be reanimated after we die!!! ;) Our greatest worry is that somehow things will be manipulated so that we can never retire!!! Face it we are simply to good and valuable to be replaced by them!!! Do gen X/Y/Z a favor they have totally irresponsible and AWOL parents, (blame it on the baby boomers or perhaps that is our fault) no matter, cut their umbilical cords put a foot in their Arse and introduce them to reality before it's to late. From reading the article if it has the slightest ring of truth then that is desperately needed.

steve-nyeoka
steve-nyeoka

I read an earlier article on dealing with the millenials and it hit the mail on the head. I allowed my intern to accompny me to meetings and he often spoke more than anyone else. They want to skit that "experience" thing and jump right in as equals to those woth 20+ years behind us. No concept of paying their "dues". And when I shared "justin" stories at home, my 20 year old son would get so offended it was humorous in itself. At 22 he's also still at home though we do force him to contribute to the bills- he hates it but who cares!) I agree they will contribute...Our last high school intern was great, another 23 year old tech I work with is hardworking (recently bought a home!). So dont write off an entire generation even though the general traits are pretty much accurate. In our modern technical society on a small percentage of us keeps thing running anyway (entire professions such as lawyers & advertising execs have always been parasites and we still survive).

No User
No User

When will the goofs finally take over the jobs that bring pain in our lives? I can't wait to have folks being to busy sending text messages to send me a bill or feel that it would be beneath them. ;) Yes, nothing in life about personalities and stereo types is 100% so there are certainly many that don't fit the mold.... Thank god.... Sorry to hear about son, I have a good pair hard sole boots that come equipped with a lighter especially designed to light a fire under an Arse if you would like to borrow them. ;) You got to kick extra hard at least 10 times a day and they come with guaranteed results.

david.shane
david.shane

When I was 19 I spent 6 weeks working as an assistant drill instructor while waiting for my A-School. The princple was simple. Strip away the existing pride so that they could find real pride through achivement. Today I mentor through that same principle. I don't do it to be mean. In fact most of the people I train are fiercely loyal to me and each other. One was 24 years old and had his second child on the way and was selling a house and buying another. That's when he really understood what I meant to do. Not everyone gets it. Some were raised just too soft to deal with the reality of adult life. So when conflict arises they also loose their ethics and what little self respect they have. The expectation is that they will be forgiven and they don't need to worry about accountability. I work in health care on clinical systems. I don't see how those types can be accomodated in my world. But maybe you'll have a better place for them. The men and women that I train deal with life better when I'm done.

No User
No User

That goes right along with my statement.... Do gen X/Y/Z a favor they have totally irresponsible and AWOL parents, (blame it on the baby boomers or perhaps that is our fault) no matter, cut their umbilical cords put a foot in their Arse and introduce them to reality before it's to late. From reading the article if it has the slightest ring of truth then that is desperately needed.

David.C.Benson
David.C.Benson

Generation X is 1963 - 1983 Millenials are 1984 - 2004 They are very different mindsets Totally missing the boat on the generations is just sloppy.

swpro
swpro

Generation X is defined in the USA as people born between 1965 and 1982. 1983-1997 is Generation Y (sometimes referred to as millenials). Get the facts straight, please. The best article on this topic appeared in Fortune Magazine last year.

toni.bowers_b
toni.bowers_b

An incorrect letter. But I'm glad I could make so many of you happy that you could tear my general writing and intelligence apart.

khenson
khenson

xeah, I make that txpo all the time (X and Y are soooo close on the keyboard!)

santeewelding
santeewelding

Toni misspoke as well as mistyped. The only one who can tear one's general writing and intelligence apart in public is one's self, Henson.

jtaylor1369
jtaylor1369

About every 3 to six months or so, there is always an article that brings up the issue about generational differences. Well..the main thing is that regardless of what generation a person belongs in, they will have to adjust somewhat to the culture of that company. Also, we all have to get along whether you're 21 or 61.

me
me

...

GiMMeABreak
GiMMeABreak

You seem to think that you're well informed. Didn't you know the hippies had a saying "don't trust anyone over 30" so the op just turned it around to "don't trust anyone under 30" Don't take every post as a personal attack on you. Paranoid much. You must have to spend a great deal of your time justifying your position to be that paranoid!

toddah
toddah

I am a 54 year old Network Admin, I handle all Active Directory, Security, Cisco communications functions and I am also 3rd tier technical support for a 500 user 18 location system. I was a IEEE for 17 years and then moved into IT from a hobby to a profession and love it. I am generally the person who ends up dealing with the "kids" when they are having trouble with anything. I have great respect for their ability to adapt and learn and I love working with them on projects because they understand the benefits of using modern technology to accomplish todays task. Where I see issues is many of them have difficulty in seeing past their immediate goals or assignments to understand the fact that the methods and functions they are developing to do the innovative work today must have forward thinking applied to see their effects down the road. I work with a group of younger people in the Geographical Information Systems group and they have a very difficult time understanding the "base" maps they are creating will be the groundwork for the construction of an entire system of mapping, wedsites, database mining operations well into the forseeable future. They are very clever and innovative in creating things that flash and pop on the screen and cause the "uninformed" to ooh and ahh and are very informative and can be used to persuade the intended audience to see things in a completely different light. However, the things they are creating are single use throw away just to meet their goals and assignments and I have a very difficult time helping them understand the largest real value is not in the presentation they are creating but in the materials and methods they can add to the collective (see BORG). I think as they become more aware of the long term they will be great.

oldemusicke
oldemusicke

Enough with the "millennials" already. For almost the last 100 years, maybe more, it's been fashionable to name each "generation" of people born in a certain decade or two. You get to pretend that everyone born in that era had the same attitudes, the same life experiences, the same values. You get to pretend they're actually another species or culture, alien to the other generations. Heck, even astrology is more fine-grained than that. This obsession over painting entire generations with a single color is the new astrology. Astrology assumes batches of births change personalities on a monthly basis, but "generationology" assumes they don't change any more than about once a decade.

WoW > Work
WoW > Work

I'm Gen77, and all this talk of GenX is this year to that year...or Y is this year to that year...the youth are going to be "Generation Confused." Businesses should change based on their customer base, not their employee base. Sure a little change may be needed, but you can't forget your current and loyal employees. Kids these days (kids...listen to me, I'm an old man?!) and from any time, maybe they just need to learn the hard way. "Think the world is just going to fall in your lap? Think that $100K+ job is just going to open right in front of you? Think again, Jr." But then again, I could be (and probably am) just wrong. Time to go play WoW and forget my generation.

jaygee_z
jaygee_z

Gen X is right after the boomers. 1961 is the earliest year I can find for Gen-X Millenialists on the other hand are no earlier than 1980/81

Craig_B
Craig_B

Wow, the article has stirred up a lot of opinions, which in itself is a good thing. I think the key is to remember that people and society are constantly changing, although the basic human soul is still looking for the same things. We tend to want to group and label everything and then complain about stereotypes; we humans can be strange at times. Growth requires change, some of the changes help the speed the growth while some changes may hinder it but all lead to a better understanding. In the business world, the "next generation" will create some changes and the "next generation" will also change as they grow. It is the way of life.

Dilberter
Dilberter

Managers are still running things like they are managing a 1950's style factory output line!? It's about time that the President or Congress ought to tell all companies with over 100 people that because of 1. Gas Prices, 2. Pollution, 3. Road Congestion, 4. etc.; that 50% of their work force MUST Telecommute!!!! After all; that's why the Internet was created; so that people could correlate ideas at vast distances; and save time from going to conferences. Managers need to let go of the idea that the work force has to be kept busy every single minute with make-work and upper management must let go of the idea that simply because they see no movement that work is not being done! ( Sometimes it takes mental organization and improvisation to formulate the methods by which a computer task can be completed; and, during this time, NO VISBLE WORK will be being done!!! )

Nil Po
Nil Po

I worked in a position where my supervisor allowed me to work from home as often as I liked as long as I got my work done. It was great and I earned several promotions. In my current job the official policy is peculiar. No telecommuting for the regular job but when we do a weekend software launch (no comp time given) we're encouraged to telecommute. Strange that management feels a need to watch us day to day but when we have to do a software launch that is vital, working from home is ok. I wish it were the other way around. Might be time to look for some place that is more logical.

Shellbot
Shellbot

Because as technology has increased, so has our workloads and productivity.. think of a filing clerk years ago..now all they do is search on the screen... "Managers need to let go of the idea that the work force has to be kept busy every single minute with make-work and upper management must let go of the idea that simply because they see no movement that work is not being done! " Good managers know this..I've worked with soem of those..I've also worked with some that didn't.. for example a while back i had a boss who classified researching on MSDN as "web surfing" and frowned upon it... Not everyone is suited to telecommuting though. I actually could probably not do more than 2 or 3 days a week telecommuting. Sometimes and office provides focus. Emails are no replacement for a face to face with collegues for ideas, and solutions. I know a good few people who instantly jump on facebook and youtube the minute the bosses backs are turned..i can just imagine them at home..5 mins work..30 mins facebook.. Not saying everyone is like this, but no way 50% are ready for it. Ahh internet creation..it was created for people to exchange ideas..yes.. but i don't think " saves time from going to conferences" ever really came into it initially..thats only really come into being since broadband. face it, in the early days before everyone became "pc savy" it was used to send jokes and porn. not to actually work on! ]:)

jck
jck

i got to telecommute when i had to stay home and take care of personal things...and i got a lot more done. when i was at the office, i getting so many phone calls (upwards of probably 30 an hour, sometimes) that i couldn't focus on one thing. i wish i could telecommute with this job i have, but i have the feeling that management wants to keep the "ever-watchful eye"...which really sucks

Shellbot
Shellbot

yes can work from home. especially in those conditions..a while back i did a few days at home, was doing up documentation and i got way more done not being harrassed all the time. but its not for eveyone. i couldn't do it every day for long periods of time.... not that i wouldn't do my work..i would need to go in now and then to get a bit of contact. i know some people who would just frack around all day and get nothing done, or do the bare minimum and then go watch tv.. its the same in the office though, some people need to be managed closly, others don't.. the ones who need managing are not canidates for working form home.

ehula
ehula

"born roughly between 1977 and 1995, also known as Generation X" What?! that would be Generation Y...

ExcitingMike
ExcitingMike

Gen. X is roughly '64-'82. I'm on the trailing end of Gen. Jones. The author needs to get her G-G-Generations right. Good analysis though. If you want to learn more about this read the book "The Coming Generational Storm" by Laurence Kotlikoff, Scott Burns. I read it 3yrs ago, pretty scary stuff.

ncarte13
ncarte13

I believe your dating is not correct. General knowledge places the Gen X group as individuals born between 1963 (or 1965) and 1983 - or so. You seem actually to be mixing in Gen X with Gen Y. And speaking as a Gen X'er - Gen Y has different characteristics as well. But you are right that neither group is intimidated by authority.

reisen55
reisen55

Forget the new kids on the block. My experience with the incoming flood of H1-B visa and young kids to replace veteran IT professionals is horrible. I was outsourced out in December, 2005 with a professional team which was entirely replaced by kids, one of whom had a previous job delivering ... no kidding ... PIZZA. This all to save money, get the job done cheaper, faster, better and increase shareholder value.

SKDTech
SKDTech

Speaking strictly from a business standpoint, if they were able to "save money, get the job done cheaper, faster, better and increase shareholder value" where is the down side? If they were so easily able to replace you at a lower cost then you need to take a long considering look at yourself. Shareholders buy stock in order to make a profit, if there is no profit or they lose money then they take their money elsewhere and the business fails. What is wrong with being replaced by a kid who delivered pizzas, if he was able to step into your job and do it better and faster for less then you very well may have been overpaid for your skills in the eyes of the business. Guess what? Businesses only stay in business for as long as they are making a profit. They make profits by spending less money than they take in and by gaining market share through both desirability of product being able to offer that product at the same or lower cost than competitors.By keeping labor costs down businesses are able to keep their prices down and attract more customers. Employees make more money by making sure they are worth more to the company and walking or at least being willing to walk across the street and work for someone who is willing to pay more for the skills they have.

reisen55
reisen55

140 people were outsourced out of IT support at Aon in December, 2005. Server and desktop professionals. We did things, oh, quickly. You know, call us as and we respond. I closed 1,200 tickets per year and have six heavy reference letters from executives and have done work for some of them since that time. We could get a new computer out in 3 hours, and a new email out in about the same time. Now, the pizza kid crowd and the outsource crowd get a new computer out in 30 days, a new email account created in 90 days and over 200 servers were infected by a worm last year. I think I and my colleagues knew what we were doing. All of this had zero effect on shareholder value and all of this is not getting things done cheaper, faster, better but slower, worse and therefore more expensive. Better get your head on straight.

submit
submit

The author has completely confused how generations are labeled in the U.S. Millenials are the generation that follows Gen X, as others have posted. Anyone qualified to talk about generational work style differences should know this. It's hard to take this post seriously when the author is telling us to prepare for a generation that's been in the workforce for over two decades already.

techrepublic
techrepublic

How can we take this blog seriously when the dates are fundamentally wrong? First, GenX ranges from 1965 to approximately 1980. GenY, which is the generation known as the Milennials, are those born post-1980. I was in High School during the 80's and it was and is common knowledge then and now that we are GenX. While the descriptions of the traits of Milennials seems accurate, the wrong dates and name given to the generations makes it looks as if shabby research was done for this article.

cniesen
cniesen

This blogger really needs to reference their sources and do more actual research before commenting on an story that is not accurate.

toni.bowers_b
toni.bowers_b

Nice of you to indict my research abilities based on a typo.

shaunsweb
shaunsweb

I think you guys miss the biggest problem of all. You have a ton of new gen people with just enough knowledge to make your job that much harder. They know just enough about computers and networks to snoop around and not enough to not cause damage.

dba88
dba88

I'm a boomer and our parents, who,from my perspective anyway, were the best of the best. They were the WW2 generation. The stuff they fought for, their values, were for the most part, priceless. Their values, some came across and some did not, got filtered out in many boomers; drugs (as in pot, LSD, mushrooms, etc.), music, art, culture shifts, socio-economics, Vietnam, Woodstock, TV, etc. Maybe not filtered out, but morphed may be a better word. My parents generation was kind, warm, caring and nurturing. The world was in a massive build mode and industrialization took over. Good versus evil was democracy versus the commies and the cold war. In turn, us boomers had a tendency to spoil our kids. They (the gen x kids) were super immersed in TV, computer games, movies, technology and the culture shift emphasized a sort of technocracy. Things became more pressurized and more competitive and the gen x'ers were asking, "Hey, what's in it for me? How do I get from here to there in the most efficient and quickest way?" Graduating college, their expectations were set at skewed levels (in the eyes of a boomer anyway), so that instead of working toward $50K or $60K after a few years, they'd ask for it right out of the gate! They felt they had it coming to them. Gen X kids did not have the pressures of Vietnam hanging over their heads. The US was a relatively safe place to be. So their work ethic, expectations. movement / mobility and communication dynamics took on a different format. Personally, I never liked ball caps and torn jeans that much, especially when I'd see them pay $65 for a pair of torn and unwashed looking jeans. My Dad didn't like the long hair of the boomer generation. He would say, "Boy... you look like a sissy!" Well, I don't like earings all that much! Gen x'ers don't like to wear suits to work, like to work remotely (so do I), don't much like taking advice from more experienced people, don't like chains of command or structured organizations. So when we moosh all this together, it means that we will all need to appeal to each others "rubs 'n' dubs." The fact is, Gen X'ers like to be shown that my way might be a better way. They like to listen and learn, they're more prone to working remotely, they are more likely to use collaborative technologies, less formal in the work place, etc. I believe big changes are on the horizon with them! They won't sit on their duffs where change is concerned! Their adaptation traits are quicker. They'll push things aside that don't make sense, such as cars that rely on oil, and not have a high tolerance for the weenies in Washington, DC to make 'nonsensical' decisions. If you don't produce, you'll lose respect from your peers and you'll be ignored faster than boomers. BUT... I think the ones that'll pull everything together will be the generation that comes along after the Gen x people. You know what they'll be like? They'll be like my Mom and Dad. Pendulum swings in strange ways between generations, each one so unique unto themselves. Look what the internet has done and is doing to the post gen x generation. Imagine what true quantum computing will do. Jack Karawak (spelling?) wrote "Cats Cradle." As I recall, one of the points in his book was, "Hey, what's in it for me?" and where his fellow man was concerned, "Hey, I got mine!" mode of thinking. In some ways, that's perhaps one of the down sides of gen x'ers. As a boomer, I'm not too terribly worried about them as they move into the workplace. I'm really excited to see what they have to offer and how they'll influence the world. Am I concerned that they'll push me aside? Nahhhh! I own the company!

FortBragg_Surfgoddess
FortBragg_Surfgoddess

Generation X is not the generation born between 77 and 95... That is incorrect. I beleive you ment Generation Y. I know this becuase I am on the tail end (or one of the first depending on how you slice it) Gen Xer's. And we are hardy Coffee Drinking, Flannel wearing, Boarding, grunge loving stock. We tried to save this country from what is happening with all these Neo-Con Helicopter children born between 77 and 95 (even though some of them were conceived at Lilith Fair or Lalopalooza SP?).

me
me

Omg... you as well?! Whats your age and job title? I want to see exactly how well you've done with your career and exactly what you've done to help improve the IT industry. Me - 24 (I'll help you out, I was born 84), IT Manager of a Global Manufacturer, Professional Member of BCS and Affiliate to the Comms Management Association... both of which have high standards and huge influence. I am degree educated and throwing in MSCE. I sit on committee with some of the biggest companies in Europe and have huge buying power from all large suppliers. Your turn. Apart from your activities and intersts listed above. Oh, exactly what have you contributed to saving your country from "Neo Con Helicopter Children" what ever the hell that means. I am truely shocked and saddened by so-called colleagues who should be representing the IT industry in a bit of a better light and not this witch hunting and agism alot of you are displaying.

ferenct
ferenct

You realy sound like you are full of yourself "IT Manager of a Global Manufacturer, Professional Member of BCS and Affiliate to the Comms Management Association... both of which have high standards and huge influence" I read just about all the threads and you show up a few places with the same atutude of "I am right because I am 24 and I am important" Get off your hight horse (thats a 4 legged animal), listen to what others say, they cant be ALL wrong, learn, yeas learn, looks like you have a some of that to do. Bet you a 50 year old has a lot more and diverse experience than you do, so what wrong with listening. Attitude like yours will be the undoing of the company eventually or you will soon have major personal conflicts at work. I respect what you have achieved and probably worked you ass off to get there, but you do have some social skill to work on. I do sincerely wish you the best of luck.

me
me

No, I just help defend and promote the industry I work in. I do not appreciate those who give younger people crap just because they are young and being generalised. I was making sure molson knew he was wrong and what he said was rubbish. I must have social kills problems, being voted employee of the month several times by my colleagues in the last 1.5 years. I must have bad social skills to build up fantastic supplier relationships which increase my buying power. I must have bad social skills to connect to everyone I work with, internally and externally, young and old. My social skills must be appauling if I have increased Satisfaction within the department since my start. I am not on my high horse, I am just extremly proud of what I have achieved in my career already... I don't deny someone who is 50 years old doesn't have more experience... I work with a lot of older people within my organisation, throughout International Group Level. I sit on committee with the IT Directors and Managers of some of the biggest companies in the UK and even Europe, and they love the fact I bring something fresh to our discussions. But I do really appreciate their experience and knowledge and still know I have a lot to learn. I have no real conflicts are work, office politics, but thats left at the door. I work with department heads to make sure we are providing the best service we can to our users. I do this to avoid conflict. But thanks.

FortBragg_Surfgoddess
FortBragg_Surfgoddess

? I was born in 66 which does put me on the tail end of the Xers? In August of 85 I joined the US Marine Corps (So I now a Neo-Con and a RINO when I see or hear one). I am one of the few Females that have been a Shop leader and for a Frontline support shop (Nuclear Biological, and Chemical defense) I was also on of the Marine Corps first HAZMAT officers. I helped implement and write numerous operating procedures, some of which are still in use today, for the Marine Corps. I served through the Persian Gulf War, and left The Corps in 95. I then Continued my education obtaining a Degree in Liberal Studies, and Computer Programming, all this while trying to save the world from the al mighty profit and dollar. I have a certificate in Multi-Cultural marketing studies, and have been a Probation youth counselor, and am currently an analyst for a Social Services agency. Nome of this was handed to me, and I do agree with the article, sonny, the younger generation has had their emotions damaged buy (unfortunately my age co-horts) their parents hovering over them and feeding them Ritalin in stead of a swift kick in the back side. I am just surprised that they got the generations wrong. So you see, young one, I do pretty much no what I am talking about. What other parts of the world have you had the opportunity to see and experience? and I believe you should have more mileage (and a degree not a lame MCSE) before you get to play with the big boys and girls

me
me

I do have a degree, BSc With Honours in Business Information Systems Management, the MCSE was something I did recently just to help further myself. Well working for a Global organisation, alot of the world I have seen thanks. Setting up business in Scotland. Working with and meeting colleagues in France, Denmark, US, Canada, China, Russia, Germany, Sweden, Ireland, Poland - the list is endless. I can't speak for all parents/children in the UK here, but a lot of empthasis is put on encouraging people to be independant and work hard... none of the over the top supervision and drugging them into being lazy and sponging members of society. If thats what you have achieved then well done, it just gives me inspiration and more motivation to do well in life, and i think I have a very good head start.

somethinggood4
somethinggood4

me@, I agree with a lot of what you've posted, but your spelling is atrocious. That's one of the things that's important to "old guard" thinkers, and we consider it pretty basic; respect for the rules. Words are spelled a specific way (in most cases, the letter 'u' in honour notwithstanding), so when you say "truely", "challanges" and "agism" you are figuratively poking the eye of everyone who takes the rules of spelling seriously. What you are saying, in effect, is "I don't care what you think is important, I have my own way of doing things." That attitude has a tendency to irk your colleagues, no matter what their age. Congratulations on your achievements; you've done very well in a short time, and I can only assume that using your resume as a weapon comes from constantly having to prove yourself to old farts like me who only wish we had your credentials.

me
me

Apologies for bad spelling, I was typing fast and not checking it. Shame this thing doesn't have spell check! And Thanks. :)

m.mock
m.mock

Mirror, mirror on the wall, tell me how great and good I am. Shouldn't it really be mirror, mirror on the wall, can I look my customers in the eye and honestly tell them we (the team) are doing the best we can. What I am seeing here is me, I and myself. What we need more than anything is we, us and working together. To those that classigy themselves as GenX and Y, thank you for ENRON, SOX, Billion $ profit in a year, the Credit Crunch, Sub-Prime Morgage. Global organisation? in my experience (14 years of working in 5 different European countries in various positions)every time I have been told this it was more like HQ mentality - we are right, everyone else is wrong. Something that works well in the US will not for instance work in Istambul. And where would that knowledge, experience and insight come from? Oh yeah, straight out of Uni and from other academic certifications. Then again, they are only customers (internal or external makes no difference).

FortBragg_Surfgoddess
FortBragg_Surfgoddess

Boy you hit the nail on the head... I was just trying to correct the article on the incorrect labeling of the Maket group...

64molson
64molson

Wouldn't some of these Ys be your own children??? From what I've seen, the Xers aren't much better than the Ys. They can afford $4 lattes @ Starbucks, but can't pay the rent or are living @ home, sponging of mom & dad because the world's just too scary!!! Doesn't anyone understand there are still winners & losers? You don't get promoted because YOU say you deserve it. If that were true, we'd all be CEOs pulling down 7-8 figure salaries!!

jpainter
jpainter

I am in gen x. 27 years old born in 1980. I am also an IT director for a insurance company. Bottom line I had a different expericene than most people my age. Had kids young, got certifications and have had to work my butt of since I was 17. I havent been living at home since I was 16. Do to my own problems that I turned around. I have not had to sponge off of mom and dad because I have worked. I think usually young people have a crappy work ethic. Regardless of there situation. They usually have to learn how to work, how to be responsible and how to be accountable. The main reason I deveolped my work ethic is because i had a family to feed at 21. It is hard when u dont have help and those kids need to eat. I belive there are pros and cons to the next generation coming in. Here they are 1. Been around techonolgy there whole life. Means they will learn easier. 2. Open more to change. Cons 1. They are young and have to learn to work 2. They have this misconeption that they will make a hundred thousand right out the door of school. That rarely happens. Bottom line is they are going to have to adjust to the reailties of the world. Just like all of the generations before them. The ones who adjust will be great. the ones who dont will be in another line of work or they will be homeless. The older generation also has issues. Less likely to change, stuck in thinking old stuff is better. I ran into this with my boss at my last job. And guess what happened I took his job. I dont belive in grouping people into generations. They need to be judged on there actions. So shooting them in the foot before they walk in the door is kind of a waste of time I think.

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