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Managers: Do you pay any attention to a resume Objective statement?

Do you, as hiring managers, give much credence to the section of a resume that is reserved for Objective? (It's the place where job candidates list things like "Good interpersonal skills" or "Proven project management skills."

We've got a discussion going on over in IT Career Management about the use of that first part of a resume that is reserved for Objective or Qualifications. For example, this is the place you'd see "Committed to superior customer service" or "Great interpersonal skills." I'd like to know if any of you, as hiring managers,  give that section of a resume much thought. Take our poll and give us some feedback.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

8 comments
rizalnia1
rizalnia1

At the very least, the Objectives tells me weather or not the candidat cares enough about getting this job to customized his objective for my job. If it's a generic statement that could cover almost anything, or includes elements that are clearly not part of this job posting, they lose points.

Kdoyle
Kdoyle

I prefer to see Qualifications rather than Objectives. Qualifications show me what the candidate can do or has done; Objectives show me what they want to do. When I'm looking at a candidate I need to quickly see if they have what I'm looking for and, as stated previously, everyone's objective is to obtain a job, so that really doesn't separate them from any other candidate. In fact, because we do not have the "latest and greatest" technology, and we're a small shop, if a candidate's objective is to work on the "latest and greatest" or move ahead they're likely to get looked over. I could be way off, but putting Objectives on a resume to me sort of says you're new and don't have a lot of experience.

greeva
greeva

I hire about 1200 people a year and this Objective section is and can be a vital introduction to a persons resume. It helps me weed out rather quickly if I'm interested or not. A well written Objective should "entice" me to look further at the applicants resume. I much prefer this objective statement over say, and entire cover letter. I just don't have that kind of time. So, in the end, I think it depends on the jobs you're hiring for and the time restraints of the hiring manager. As the poll indicated, it's pretty much 50/50.

greg.schwartz
greg.schwartz

I was going to comment on this when you posed this question to job seekers. I think most people do themselves a disservice having an objectives section in their resume. As a manager, I assume that your objective is to get the job that I'm trying to fill. Anything other than that usually sounds like BS. So if you're going to include one, I advise you to be very careful about what you put in it. Make it meaningful. Aspire to something truly great, yet relevant. Otherwise, leave it out and let me get to your qualifications.

mails2raaj
mails2raaj

Some IT companies are insisting that a candidate must have respective IT degree like B.Tech,Master of Computer Applications(M.C.A) etc.,How far it is correct? Some candidates are having good skills in IT and unfortunately they may not have respecive degree/PG in IT.So, every body must realize that there should not be qualification restriction. Even though some people who are having respective degree/PG there are not performing well,then what is the use of having qualification? My conclusion is if a candidate is having skill set and minimum qualifications, he can fit in IT every where as that going on in USA.In india only we have this type of restriction.Plz. all HR people of IT companies should realize it.

tombynum1969
tombynum1969

In lieu of a complete cover letter...I believe the Objectives section is ~THE~ place that drives me to finish reading a resume. If someone can't put together a well planned and structured paragraph telling me why I should read the rest of their resume...then why should I. Yes, it's all fluff and highly subjective, but then again, I'm looking for good communication skills and clarity of thought relavent to the job being sought. Not just bullet points of skills under a section header.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

I managed a Supplemental Instruction (academic assistance) program on my campus for 2 years. Students begged for SI Leader jobs as they paid well and contributed toward tuition for the SI Leader. Key to success as an SI Leader is imagination and flexibility. Good SI Leaders know how to spell, write, and speak in addition to possessing the aforementioned qualities. My best SI Leaders got those qualities across in the Objectives section of their resumes. edit: remove unnecessary

alex.a
alex.a

>> As a manager, I assume that your objective is to get the job that I'm trying to fill.

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