CXO

Tech trends to watch out for in 2013

IT leaders need to be smart about the decisions they make and truly leverage next-generation tools and strategies. Here are some technology trends that will shape their decision-making in 2013.

With the New Year comes a fresh set of technology imperatives, challenges and opportunities for organizations to consider. The increased innovation in the technology sector means that companies are finally in a position to be smart about the IT decisions they make and truly leverage next-generation tools and strategies to mitigate risk and shape strategies for the future. Below are my predictions around the technology trends that will shape and impact their decision-making in 2013.

Prediction #1: Cloud interoperability will take the spotlight

Cloud interoperability will be huge: private cloud adoption will continue to grow, but more organizations and MSPs will adopt a hybrid public / private approach. This hybrid approach could simply be an organization's private cloud interfacing with other public clouds in a secure manner, or it could mean augmenting an internal private cloud with additional compute, storage or cooling resources from a public cloud. The biggest challenge with this reality will be the manageability of the hybrid environment. Generally, enterprises and MSPs don't use the same set of tools and monitor environments in the same way. To ensure these hybrid cloud environments deliver on their promise of costs savings and productivity benefits, vendor-agnostic management and monitoring solutions are critical.

Prediction #2: Worldwide economic struggles will direct the data center world

Data centers are consuming more power, more cooling and their density continues to rise, but an organization ability to retrofit or expand the physical space is challenging and not cost effective. Private and hybrid cloud models will get traction because it saves on cost. It isn't cost intuitive to upgrade a physical data center, so the shift to private clouds is the next logical step.

Worldwide economic struggles both in the financial sector, and more importantly in the energy sector, have the high probability of forcing data centers to close or increase prices to stay functional. While there has been a data center construction boom in the last several years, the demand for space will have to be countered by ever-rising costs in the energy industry. Depending on how the world can come together and address the energy crisis, this will continue to dramatically impact the data center world.

Prediction #3: BYOD and virtualization will collide

Smartphone, tablet, laptop and other mobile devices will all begin leveraging virtualization technologies, increasing virtualized BYOD, and this will become the next evolution of the mobile device. Consumers will be confident in the security and interoperability of a working profile with their personal profile on any device they choose, regardless of their location, and they will no longer need access to their specific mobile device. With virtualization, they can grab a friend's and have access to their virtual identity no matter where they are. Service providers have already started leveraging this technology, and enterprises are not far behind, as they will benefit once they've addressed potential security and identity challenges and embraced the evolution.

Prediction # 4: Cloud outages by major Web hosts will gain momentum

We will continue to see cloud outages by all major cloud providers.  These outages will dramatically impact businesses and hosting customers on the cloud. Technology today is mature enough to prevent complete outage of customer assets.  The big balance has always been with hosting how much money you are willing to spend to ensure uptime.  More and more cloud and hosting customers are putting the trust in the clouds resilience without really understanding or choosing to understand that without paying for resilience you will experience some outage at some point.  As the cloud provider drive for pricing down to compete with each other and gain market share the cost of driving price down has to be found in some level of corners being cut.  Which will lead to more outages. Example: It comes down to mitigating cost vs. risk. Amazon keeps trying to drive costs down, but the tradeoff is their customers must decide how much they want to pay to mitigate their own risk. In order to lower risk, a company suffers the effect on its monthly price. However, with today's economy and the focus on cost rather than risk, outages will still occur.

Prediction # 5: The Presidential imperative will be cybersecurity

President Obama has been elected for a second term and one thing is crystal clear: cybersecurity must be a top priority for him in 2013. There is an increased awareness around the issue of cybersecurity, and it is only set to rise further as more and more people transition information to the cloud. In 2013, the president will have to answer: how do I protect people on the Internet? We've had multiple bills passed but what we really need is education around how to be safe as a nation on the Internet and in the cloud. A cyber war is as dangerous as a physical one and with out a government focus on cybersecurity, we're facing that risk head on.

Looking ahead

When you take a step back and look at all 2013 technology predictions, not only from me, but from analysts and industry experts as well, one thing becomes clear: there are lots of moving parts for organizations to control. It will be critical next year that they have tools to manage and monitor these ever-changing environments. Organizations must be smarter about IT, proactive rather than reactive and continue to innovate.

Jeremy Sherwood is a Cloud Strategist for ScienceLogic.

22 comments
mtnman28715
mtnman28715

No, the Presidential imperative is tyranny and a disregard for the Constitution.

kevsan
kevsan

Predictions can only be based on what we already know. Tomorrow we will learn something new and our predictions will change. Someone, somewhere will stumble on something that will change everything just like the humble Mosaic browser turned a rather mundane Internet into what we have today. One man, one idea. World changing

rustys
rustys

Predictions 4 & 5 are completely negated with 4 being completely irrelevant because I avoid prediction #1 at all cost. My responsibility as an IT Support Providor is to advise my clients on Cost Effective Solutions that I am happy with. To do this I have to balance security and uptime against financial outlay and for the SME environment I will not advise any of my clients to put their data out on the internet. The 'cloud' is just another buzzword for shared storage and anything where my clients data and software is not under my control is unacceptable. Prediction #2 has no relevance to myself or most other IT people I know. However private/hybrid clouds is plainly yet another unnecessary trend. Predicion #3 IS one that concerns me a great deal. BYOD is bad - very bad and is something I think needs discouragement on most levels. Having been involved with several cases where corporate and private IP has been stolen I think this is an area where caution must be advised. After writing this I am wondering why I read the article in the first place.

matthew.david
matthew.david

I understand and accept that techies are not always perfect writers. I am not bothered by grammar errors in blogs such as this as long as I can understand the content. I can usually figure out a writer's intent, but I had to read and reread several parts of this blog because the grammar and punctuation tripped me up. I will not point out every minor issue with this post, but will point out a few places where the writing got in the way of the message. Prediction #2 begins with “Data centers are consuming more power, more cooling and their density continues to rise, but an organization ability to retrofit or expand the physical space is challenging and not cost effective.” I believe “organization ability” should be “organization’s ability.” An ability to organize is much different than the ability of an organization. This may seem minor, but it was enough to make me stop and reread a few times. Prediction #4 also has issues with use of the possessive. The apostrophe is omitted from “clouds resilience,” which should be “cloud’s resilience.” The following, also from Prediction #4, required several attempts to decipher: “As the cloud provider drive for pricing down to compete with each other and gain market share the cost of driving price down has to be found in some level of corners being cut. Which will lead to more outages.” It could be that “cloud provider drive” should be “cloud providers drive,” meaning that multiple cloud providers drive, with drive being a verb. Perhaps it was intended to be “cloud providers’ drive,” with drive being a noun that multiple cloud providers possess (plural and possessive). I believe the latter to actually be the intended meaning, but only after reading the sentence several times. A comma between “As the cloud provider drive for pricing down to compete with each other and gain market share” and “the cost of driving price down has to be found???” also would have helped me understand the meaning. “Which will lead to more outages,” isn’t even a complete sentence. I am not the grammar police or a grammar snob. I am not trying to be a jerk. While I consider myself to be a reasonably good writer, I too make mistakes. It is often difficult for a writer to catch his or her own errors and typos because, as we proofread our own work, we tend to see what we meant to say rather than what we actually wrote. This is why I always have someone else proofread my writing. This was an interesting piece. I would have enjoyed reading it a lot more if it had been scanned by an editor or proofread by a friend. Oh my god. That does sound pretty jerky. Maybe I am a bit of a grammar snob. Sorry. I did not have anyone proofread this post. Feel free to point out all my errors. I guess I deserve any criticism for being such a grammar jerk.

rward1
rward1

Value has always been a force in IT. With the dollar and IT talent shrinking I see doing much with little. It is going to be tough the next 4 years unless you are in a government job. :) We do not need the government regulating the internet. They can't even balance a budget.

leo_agus_r
leo_agus_r

Just read at a glance and stuck on MSPs. Sorry if I don't understand this but IT, BYOD are common to me but not this one. Thanks.

MarkWAliasQ
MarkWAliasQ

@janet ...Like a Cloud According to the above, it looks like all tech trends will revolve around the Interweb this year then

janet.marsh
janet.marsh

A very interesting piece and one that holds a lot of water

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

That doesn't mean they aren't relevant to others. Not every article is going to apply to the entire audience. You read it because you didn't know in advance that the content wouldn't apply to the way you work. Live and learn.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

it usually best to send them directly to the author. Most articles have a link to e-mail the author.

info
info

...then you should have deleted, or substantially trimmed, your post! ;)

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

In five years they'd be out of sand. (with proper nods to Milton Friedman)

JSherw00d
JSherw00d

The less the government gets involved the better. However, it seems they like to be involved in everything.

JSherw00d
JSherw00d

Totally understand and the dislike of having to look up acronyms. When I wrote these, I intended to go back and define them. Point well taken. Thanks for reading it.

llessem
llessem

Managed Service Provider - I am one :) - see insite.ca

mckinnej
mckinnej

Just a guess, but I think it means Major Service Provider. Seems to fit the context. Acronyms are one of my pet peeves. The military has a staggering number of them, but they know how to use them. They even have an acronym dictionary. IT is a pretty prolific acronym generator too, but the tech press doesn't know how to use them. Acronyms should always be defined before their first use, period. It's simple courtesy to the reader. It's important because there are so many acronyms that it is inevitable some will be reused. Unfortunately it is rare practice in the tech press.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

While working with the Australian Defence Force as a civilian financial and management specialist in the Royal Australian Air Force I attended lots of conferences for senior staff. At one I encountered a very serious and heated discussion going on between a small group of senior uniform staff and senior civilian staff. It was all over AERs, one side saying they were due in four weeks and the other claiming they were all due six weeks back. After a minute or so I managed to get them to be quite and pointed out that the uniform people were referring to Airmen's Evaluation Reports while the civilians were talking about Additional Estimate Returns - neither group knew about the other's meaning for AER. It was fun to watch the fight at first, but only for a little while, which is why I sorted it out for them. I suspect I may have been one of the few civilians who knew about the RAAF AER as I helped the Base Commander, my immediate boss, complete the ones for the HQ RAAF staff in our office.

rustys
rustys

Nothing winds me up more than reading an artilce about Google (GOOG), Microsoft (MSFT), Apple (APPL) etc, etc, etc .... Honestly, we no not need all these acronyms and when someone that truly understands the English language reads them and tells me how they get confused I wonder how it is soem someone with English as a second or third language.