Bring Your Own Device

TechRepublic's new BYOD Policy helps IT stem safety problems

Most employees want to be able to choose the device they're most comfortable using and that allows them to work how and when they want. Help deal with any problems proactively with this BYOD policy download.

What's more important than a paycheck? A lot, according to many recent surveys of employees. Most important to employees seems to be flexibility in the workplace.

One thing that drives this flexibility is the BYOD movement. Most employees want to be able to choose the device they're most comfortable using and that allows them to work how and when they want. In a recent Cisco survey of 600 U.S. IT leaders, 40% cited "device choice" as their employees' top BYOD priority, with the second being the ability to "work during personal time, and vice versa."

Of course, some CEOs will hear this and say, great, open the doors for any and all device preferences. But as an IT leader who knows the data safety ramifications, this move has to be tempered.

TechRepublic is offering a new download, available for free as part of a TechRepublic Pro membership, or that may be purchased through our online store. This BYOD Policy, describes the steps your employees must take when connecting personal devices to the organization's systems and networks. Simply copy the text from the zipped PDF into your favorite word processor and customize it to fit your needs.

One thing you can expect going forward is that workers will be connecting, sharing and working collaboratively from home, a café, an airport, at a client's location and even on a commuter train. Be safe and establish a solid BYOD policy first.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

5 comments
draco vulgaris
draco vulgaris

In most work places, there's "Company Confidential". It's not copied without authorization. It's not discussed outside of the workplace. You might get a warning for a first offense. For subsequent offenses kiss your job goodbye! If you are working on a military contract you should have a look at Title 18 U.S.C. sections 793, 794 and 798. ISTR wording like "ten years, ten thousand dollars, or both. That was some years ago and the amounts may have increased substantially!

janitorman
janitorman

allow a worker to have his personal cel phone at work, if there was critical data that could be accessed on a work station. HUGE security risk, it only takes a second to take a shot of a screen.. no direct access.. and send it to a competitor or anyone else. All this talk of using some other device than what the company provides is leading to the possibility that every company will be compromised sooner or later.

Pete6677
Pete6677

Good luck enforcing that, janitorman! You CEO will demand you allow his iPad on the network, like it or not. And he WILL take it home and let the kids play on it.

draco vulgaris
draco vulgaris

I know a guy with a eidetic (photographic) memory. I don't think he's as fast as a camera but if he can read it he can repeat it word for word, tomorrow or next month! I've seen this guy give instructions for fixing a bug in an assembler language program over the phone, citing the line numbers of the lines to be changed, from memory. Okay, he's got a fairly rare ability! But how would you know that he possess it.

jamesjump
jamesjump

janitorman: my first reaction to your comments was mostly in agreement, but we have to remember the workplace is moving outside the office. Most of my users are on mobile devices already, many don't even have hard walled offices, so the thought of allowing personal devices to improve job satisfaction is simply a must - it's going to happen regardless. As an IT manager, I can't imagine what that's going to mean in regards to support. Exciting, scary or both!

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