CXO

Use holiday parties to climb the ladder

Having an office party? John M McKee shares his Top 10 tactics for climbing the ladder over cocktails.

"Coach John, my company is having a Holiday party again this year.  Will it hurt my career if I don't go?  These aren't really parties and they sure aren't fun.  But I worry that if I don't show up, it will get noted and I may end up with a black mark on my record.  I'd prefer to avoid it entirely, but assuming I should go - do you have any advice about how to make the best of it?"

-  Unwilling Ken, Des Moines, IA.

Ken, I hear similar comments each year about these company affairs, so I understand your feelings about attending.  However, this is one event that you really should attend.  As a former company leader myself, I've seen the party from both sides and I know that if your leaders decided to go to the effort of creating a holiday party; then someone thought it really was important.

So, my advice is: go. And don't go grudgingly - use it to your benefit.

Smart job pros know that schmoozing at a company event can be a real opportunity to advance their career.  Here are my "Top 10 do's and dont's for climbing the ladder over cocktails." 1. Determine an objective. In advance of the event, expert “schmoozers” noodle about a potential best-possible outcome, relative to career growth. Think through a few realistic scenarios of how you might work toward achieving your objective. 2. Debrief your guest. As important as it is for you to know who the “important people” are at an event, the same holds true for your guest. The person you've chosen to accompany you to a business function, and how they behave, reflects directly on you – either positively or negatively.

3. Make sure you're seen. Arrive at the event early. Make a point of speaking to and thanking your boss and/or the host of the party. Introduce your guest, and generally spread good tidings. Show your humanity and connect on a different level before things really heat up.

<!--[endif]-->4.  The gift of gab. Generally speaking, people migrate to those who make them feel most comfortable. Appearing at ease during a time when others are feeling anxious or uncomfortable will make you look more like a “natural leader".  Read the local news before going so you've got some common conversation topic (aside from work!) with others.

5. Maintain your visibility but be "camera ready" The location where you are situated should be highly visible.  After all - you've gone to the trouble of attending, right?  So stand, or take a table, in a place that is approachable. And recognize that there will always be someone who will be ready use his or her phone to take a picture. That's how it is today, so keep it in mind. 6. First impressions count. How you introduce yourself to people, especially superiors, is important. Develop more than one way of introduction, and keep in mind that the secret to a good first meeting is self-confidence, poise and emitting a generally affable air. Bonus Tip: Keep business cards with you at all times.  This one's often forgotten by those attending company meetings or social events.  Dole them out liberally. You want to remain top of mind and also be completely accessible, post-event.

7. Leaders admire those who can articulate. Being able to effectively communicate, off the cuff, what you do for an organization, without gloating or over-inflating, is critically important. Long-winded answers with ebbs and flows can render the actual answer lost in translation. When and if appropriate, use the opportunity to self-promote and impart any new ideas you may have in a way that will not be construed as bragging or credit hogging way. 8. Network sharing isn’t always to your benefit – Whether it’s an embarrassing recording of a speech, a photo of someone tripping on the dance floor, or simply a shot of someone who’s had too much to drink, your story could show up on someone’s wall or even blog. Facebook and MySpace are riddled with pictures which may have seemed like fun at the time; but later could be very bad for your career. 9. Grievances need not apply. A social business event is not the time to clear the air about things, or people, that have been bothering you, nor is it a time to speak at another’s expense. Talking negatively about others will be a greater loss for your image and career. 10. Imbibe thoughtfully. I know, this one's obvious, but I am putting it onto my list because it's still a big issue.  Bosses and HR Types are usually pretty aware of those people who weren't able to act responsibly when it came to alcohol.  Rightly or not, how you behave in social gatherings, can affect your career trajectory.

Finally, Unwilling Ken -Even if you only make a fast appearance, it's the smart career move.  And, besides, most of the folks in Des Moines are really great people.

Here's to your career!

john

Leadership Coach

About

John M. McKee is the founder and CEO of BusinessSuccessCoach.net, an international consulting and coaching practice with subscribers in 43 countries. One of the founding senior executives of DIRECTV, his hands-on experience includes leading billion d...

51 comments
NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Was the farewell party for the spouse's employer. They had been bought out and were being "merged" after the new year. Since the old company would no longer exist, there were a LOT of logo'd tchotchkes available, enough so that everybody got a cup and thermos set and a polo shirt (in the correct size) as an attendance gift. Then there were the jackets, hats, pens, pencils, and coffee cups. We also had door prizes and the drunk DJ, BJay. (No, I'm not kidding! That [u]is[/u] his name.)

symowallo
symowallo

Aaargh! Stop this "Happy Holiday" BS. It's Christmas, people! Nobody else is offended!!!!

Modular Nebula
Modular Nebula

We have one, Friday, 6 to 10or11 PM, rented party hall, decent food, open bar, dj, couple hundred employees and their spouses or guests. We all work our arses off all year and the party is a "thanks" from the leaders. We get a whole bunch of gifts (baskets, gift cards, gadgets) from our vendors/contractors and give them out in random drawing raffles. A few years ago one dude got all crazy with the air guitar and wild dancing, but he's a nut anyway so it may not have been too much drink. His boss later reprimanded him severely for just acting foolish. The year before that a young guy was hitting on lots of chicks and was definitely in no shape to drive home (and didn't), but he's since shaved his weird goatee and gone through a leadership training program and advanced in his position, so it didn't wreck his career even though the leaders were aware that night. Overall it's a pretty good party. Not a Dead concert or ReggaeFest or anything, but still, not bad. We don't do it to schmooze, we just relax and have fun. I'm sure the bosses notice who says hi and thanks and chats for a bit, but it's not gross brown nosing by any means.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Ahnyone who expects this sort of rubbish from me will see me continuing my career somewhere else. A place where the length and flexibility of my proboscis is not important....

JamesRL
JamesRL

Last year and this, big holiday parties were cancelled at my firm. Even if deposits were non refundable, management took a stand that in a year where there are wide scale layoffs, the idea of a showy celebration was not appropriate. Instead we will have department sized inexpensive events like lunchs instead. I've been taking my team to a a BBQ chicken place every year just before Xmas, that will become our "official" event. But when we return to "normalcy" I would consel, as I've done here every year that people should attend. I do think the idea of using the event to climb the ladder is a bit um "crass" and declasse . But I do think its a good opportunity to talk to people outside of their normal work mode, and bond. Sometimes those relationships can help in your long term career, more often they help out when you need favours, but I wouldn't make a formal plan for who you will or will not spend time with. Jame

jdclyde
jdclyde

Find out if it is casual, semi-casual, or formal. I have seen people show up VERY casual to a formal party because it was on "my time, and I will dress any damn way I please!" Not always easy to watch people sink because they are stupid or have a very poor attitude.

CareerCoach
CareerCoach

If you were the boss, would you have a Holiday Party for your firm?

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