DIY

The three most important security steps the small business should take

Security is complex but you have to start somewhere. This is, in my opinion, the bare minimum, basic, no-brainer, and got-to-have things for small business security.

Security is complex but you have to start somewhere. This is, in my opinion, the bare minimum, basic, no-brainer, and got-to-have things for small business security.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This article is sure to incite some debate as I could have easily listed ten or more steps a small business should take in terms of security. Some might disagree with the three I've selected here-and that's ok. Anyone reading this blog will hopefully get the point, which is that security can be complex, especially if you're a small business-but you have to start somewhere. Where do you begin if you're a lawyer running an office with six computers? Or a doctor who has a nurse running the "IT Stuff." You might not be able to afford everything under the sun, or that pricey consultant or that expensive managed service. But that doesn't mean you don't still have security concerns.

If you're a small business, please view these steps for exactly what they are: a starting point-simply an organized a place to begin. These are the absolute bare minimum, basic, no-brainer, and got-to-have things! If you know someone who has a small business, send him or her this blog.

The three most important security steps a small business should take are:

1. Antivirus Software

2. Firewalls

3. OS Patching

Let's dig in...

Antivirus software

Please raise their hand if a virus has infected your computer at some point. Now take that hand and go purchase some Antivirus software for all the PCs in your small business! You'd be surprised (I always am) about how many people still miss this basic fundamental step. Many times I also find that while folks have no problem buying and installing the software they can't seem to keep it up to date. Maybe their subscription ran out, or they have the software configured incorrectly, but it isn't updated with the latest virus definitions (those would be the antidotes to the virus, for the lay reader). Always ensure your small business has Antivirus software and that it is up to date.

Firewalls

The typical small business will have DSL or cable for Internet access. With almost all of these connections you will be provided with a small firewall like a D-Link or Linksys brand appliance. These firewalls are given to you for a reason. They are better than nothing, I will grant you that, but they are not the most robust firewalls in the world, and in many cases they won't provide the small business with adequate protection.

A sensible investment for a small business is a higher-grade firewall, preferably an application layer firewall (see wikipedia.com for an explanation of application layer firewalls). Better yet, a Unified Threat Management (UTM) appliance offers companies multiple edge-of-your-network security features like network-based Antivirus, intrusion prevention, and anti-Spam. See this whitepaper on TechRepublic.com for more information on UTMs. A UTM can be an effective means to maximize your security without completely whipping out your budget.

OS patching

There's a good chance your small business runs Microsoft products like Windows XP and Microsoft Office, and so on. If it does, you may be vulnerable. Microsoft's operating systems are a big target for hackers for several reasons, not the least of which involves their popularity. Everyone picks on the popular OS, and there's also the fact that, historically, they've had many vulnerabilities. And until that changes, Microsoft will continue to release security patches on a monthly basis that close these vulnerabilities. They key is to make sure your Microsoft products are up to date and have the latest patches. One important thing to consider is making sure those patches don't break any of your applications. You may wish to deploy the patches to one or two of your computers first to make sure they don't cause any major problems before you role them out en masse.

Final thoughts

Ok, I know. The savvy IT guy reading this article is all fired up right now. He's got thirteen other things to add to my list. I say to you, post them to the threads below. We want to hear them. For all you small businesses, read the threads below and check out the other tips from the experts in our midst. Use these suggestions as you budget for IT security and make practical decisions about how to improve your small businesses security. It's my belief that some security is better than no security, so start small, do what you can, and budget/plan for the future.

Jeremy L. Smith writes about IT security and Microsoft Products. As a former Microsoft Certified Trainer he taught hundreds of students on many of Microsoft's most popular products. He holds the following IT certifications: CISSP, MCT (inactive), MCSE+I, MCSA, CNE, A+, N+, and has completed a Masters of Science in Information Technology. He currently works as a solutions architect where he designs enterprise implementations of the Active Directory as well as IT security solutions for the Public Safety Industry. He also teaches computer security classes for National University and the University of Phoenix.

48 comments
elizabeth_coleman
elizabeth_coleman

Good thoughts all. No question. You're right, how do you pick? For me though I'd have added data protection as an essential element for those who don't lock the barn door until the horse is gone. When that inevitable hacker gets you or your system simply crashes, what does the small business do then? Most, who have not protected their data, will be out of business within months. Protect yourself! Of course, I'm prejudiced as that's the business I'm in but we've seen the results of what happens when data is not protected, and it isn't pretty.

alex.a
alex.a

Use GPO to enforce robust passwords and password changes. I've seen so many small businesses where users are not required to change their password, or even to have them -- a tragedy waiting to happen. Ensure that rights are correctly set on all network shares. Users should be given sufficient rights to do their job -- no more, no less. Again, I've seen so many small business where group EVERYONE is given full rights to the root of the network drive. Users seldom need full rights to anything. At most, they may need read/write rights to certain directories, but most users need read-only rights to most network resources. And if there's a directory that ordinary users have no business browsing, then they should have no rights to it. And please, assign rights to groups, never to users, even if you have to create a group that contains only a single user. Users come and go; groups are forever.

1bn0
1bn0

Lawyers never touch there technology. They can easily afford to have someone come in to do what they need. Same goes for Doctors. Too much liability if they screw things up. Think patient confidentiality. AntiVirus: You are absoutely correct. It's the first thing I loook for, EVERY TIME I SIT AT A MCAHINE. It's the last thing they think of doing and , in my opinion, the top requirement. Firewall. I've seen businesses running straight to the net with a hub connected to the DSL modem. To many scary things can happen to even think about them. For a real small business, a basic firewall is more than adequate. If you are doing tech support for the business, Consider a VPN capable router/firewall that will allow you to connect to the network remotely. Upgrading beyond that leaves other things not done. Upgrades. Necessary evil. They WILL break things, but not as many things as will break if you don't do them. Set every machine for auto updates. Missing item for "BASIC" security. Install a SERVER!. I am trying to convince a couple of Small Business clients to upgrade to this right now. Open Source is fine if you can support it. Windows Server is fine too. Just get the account security centralized on the server and stop creating users on every machine. Makes moving them around when the boss upgrades his computer "again". You know how that goes. There is usually one user who always needs a faster/better/bigger machine. So they get it and then you play musical desks with all the rest tiull you finaly throw out that last Windows98 machine the summer student gets stuck with.

mdean
mdean

You forgot the very BEST thing a small business can do regards security - switch to open source everything.

sylvain.drapeau
sylvain.drapeau

... and that would be policies. Even the most basic security setup needs computer, internet and email use policies. There are tons of templates all over the net which help keep the price low (read "free"). With that 4th step, I believe you would have a good start.

alexiito
alexiito

I think that since three years ago. Really is at less, the minimun secutiry to implenment. I add a thing, Antispywares. Thanks a lot.

ed.gelbstein
ed.gelbstein

I would think that these should be taken for granted and think that security covers technology, people and processes: 1. physical security (particularly untinterruptible power supply) and controlled access to servers and computers 2. logical security - from identity management (who has access)and rights management (what they are allowed to do) to patches 3. ensure essential processes are carried out, notably backups (and know how to restore data) - from what I have seen, the least systematically practiced.

Habif
Habif

The author is quiet right, limiting to 3 is a hard ask. I don't dispute the 3 listed. Aside note, something that really frustrates me is the number of small business' (and home users) that use daily accounts set with administrator level access. So if the business does not follow some form of security "checklist" then the have shot themselves in the foot before they start. Sure the small business probably does not appreciate "good system practice" and blaming Microsoft / Resellers is just a volatile debate - even thought they are culpabale - or OSvOS bashing, it does not fix the problem ... Therefore I would suggest defining a start point before we begin counting the security steps ... 0. Add and USE a Non-Admin daily user account 1. Anti Virus 2. Firewalls 3. OS Patching ... then all the other good options like backups etc. These are OS neutral steps!

Jaqui
Jaqui

DO NOT USE INSECURE SOFTWARE TO START WITH. ok, so in reality that only leaves one option. OPENBSD, the ONLY operating system and software collection to have 2 exploits only in over 12 years. beating every other operating system for security hands down. best of all, the small business with a LIMITED budget can afford the cost of open source solutions, where the cost of proprietary solutions, notably only windows fits this any more, is very prohibitive for a small business to secure effectively.

d_g_l_s
d_g_l_s

To say that a simple D-Link or Linksys router is not enough for a small business is like saying generic acetylsalicylic acid or aspirin is not enough for a headache but that one must have T3 or nothing! I guess I love it most when concrete examples are used to support instead of pure subjective statements like "in many cases they won???t provide the small business with adequate protection" which is without support in the document. Also it is without support as I have both worked with companies that utilize these and those that do not and find these are the best. Here's why I believe the simple router is best. Number one they are not prone to the typical complex issues surrounding complex "superior" systems such as "application layer firewalls". Simple is almost always best. I want to hear what the rest of those who have tried both sides have to say.

junk1
junk1

Backups are the other most fundamental mistake that small businesses make from my experience. Probably the most important thing a small business can do is not only implement these things but put a process in place to check them regularly. Patches, I agree are important and most small businesses need to set Windows Updates to automatic. Unless you have someone to research every update for compatibility and test it (no small businesses I know have this) then you need to turn on auto-updates!

SKDTech
SKDTech

Maybe, maybe not. As a user of open source I have to say that it adoption should always be carefully considered. Are there great open source alternatives out there? Yes. Are they for everyone? No. The biggest factor comes back to support and ease of use. The support is not always easy to find, particularly for the layperson, and in my experience these programs can often require a more educated user simply to use them effectively. The business owner may not wish to go through the hassle of training his personnel on the new software when the software he has already works and has a shorter learning curve regardless of the cost of the product license. Convenience has a price point as well in business.

kevin
kevin

Following on from this, just like to say users, dont forget the users. Number 1 source of everything that goes wrong on a network.

jim.edwards
jim.edwards

1.) Employees trained to be human firewalls. (RE:USB memory & ETC.) 2.) Best practices as taught by your primary platforms. Of course Anti-Virus and firewalls ETC. 3.) Effective back-ups

robo_dev
robo_dev

The backup process, and the storage of backup media offsite is very critical. And there need to be BOTH full image backups and daily data backups. If the PC is stolen, lost in a fire, or the hard drive crashes, it's going to take LOTS of time to recover the OS, and all the apps. Many small businesses run some specialized software app (e.g. Point of Sale) that can have all sorts of customization and weird hardware (barcode scanners, cash drawer). So it's not just a generic PC, it's got extra little drivers and utilities that would take hours to reinstall.

jdclyde
jdclyde

oh yeah, you don't need to go out and purchase third party software to keep your OS from pooching. :D

Wand_a
Wand_a

Recently I found out that there is more than Microsoft for OS. Any version of Linux is an option. Although, all OSes have vulnerabilities, Microsoft is definitely the largest target. As for OS, there are plenty of open source AVs out there as well. Google Open Source Software and start there. I would feel confident using Ubuntu, and Openoffice.org as a replacement for MS Office, Comodo for AV, and the list just goes on.

bdulac
bdulac

It seems that it would depend on the application as to what type of router would be the most appropriate. Of course an application layer firewall is a great bonus but not usually necessary for most small business unless they have serious confidential data or have reason to believe they would be a target for attack. Some types of businesses are more aware of having better security in place even if they are small. I agree simpler is better for most unless there's a need for greater security. In those cases it always makes sense to use the right tool for the job. Sometimes more complex routers just make sense from a security perspective just for the sake of having greater control over settings if anything.

Stimpi
Stimpi

"Backups are the other most fundamental mistake that small businesses make from my experience." Think about it, say your running a server whether mission critical or not-- OK TO INSTALL PATCHES MEANS A REBOOT - redundant servers are a MUST. What should I tell my company, stopp working while my cheap software based firewall udates and I re-boot, give me a break.

Ron_007
Ron_007

I would modify your first point about AV to be a little more generic and say Anti-Malware. There is some much more nastiness than simply viruses that has to be protected against. Whether going with an All-in-one suite or picking "Best of Breed" for each type, you have to cover all of the bases. The point Junk1 made about backups is certainly a good one, I'd put Disaster Recovery in my top 4 too. It's not limited to small business. I was working for a $Billion a year company that lost 3 months of data because of inadequate backup procedures (the drive was defective, but no one tested the backups). Do your backups "religiously", do test restores frequently, transport and store your backup media securely and keep at least one copy off-site ...

unellen
unellen

and I've been looking for antivirus software that doesn't plug up my computer at start up(like Norton), but gets the job done on a timely basis (I like Norton, just not the time it takes for it to tell me everything is nice)for an inexpensive price. Recommendations??? On the other two points I couldn't agree more, among other things and having to learn retail compliance, it almost comes with the territory

SKDTech
SKDTech

Always important to have defined security and usage policies in writing, easily accessed and mandatorily read and signed by all employees. It may not stop them from doing something stupid but it solves problems when it comes time to defend your decision to fire an employee for improper computer behaviors i.e. surfing porn or other no-no sites.

Jaqui
Jaqui

the av and firewall are included, FREE. :D and getting chrootkit is free also, since rotkits are the only malware that runs on linux or bsd systems to enable exploits.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I've not read the comments below so I don't know if someone jumped on you already. First, Welcome. I'm glad to hear you've broken free of the msMatrix and realized that there are more OS than just what Microsoft and Apple offer. There's a huge world fo software out there and win32/64 is a very small part of it though the most recognized segment. Now, back to my point. It's not even the size of the target. MS could be 2% of the market and there OS would still be a piece of swiss cheese. They simply don't focus on secure code as one of the primary goals of there development. They build code first, and formost, as the product to generate a profit; this means the goals are shipping deadline, pretty interface, user hand holding and then security provided it does not effect the previous. They've taken a step in the right direction with Vista but only because the customers are not lead as blindly as they once where. There's been a lot fo noise about MS product quality so with Vista, they've had to make security a more important goal of the development process. The size of the target effecting the quality of security is known as "Security Through Obscurity" with the idea that if your little and can stay unnoticed, your secure. The reality is that if you can stay unnoticed, your just that, unnoticed. Have a look for a Tech Republic article called "Security through Visability" or similar unless Apoth has already posted you the link. In short, obscurity is only of use too an attacker as they want to be unnoticed even if there effects are meant to be obvious. Obscurity is hiding and sneaking about while knowing your screwed if they spot you. Security is being able to stand infront of a speeding dumptrick and know that it's not going to harm a hair on your head when it gets too you. Security is being completely visible while only allowing interaction with authorized sources. Last, get your hands on VMware Server (no cost license) and as many liveCD as you like from any OS you can find if that's what your into. Remember that "Linux" is only the OS core; one peice of lego among all the peices. There are hundreds of OS based on the Linux kernel and they are all similar but different OS. Ubuntu Linux is based on Debian Linux but is not the same as Debian Linux. They both have there own personalities and goals though they are assembled from the same commodity parts. If your looking for some Linux based OS to try, check out Ubuntu, Mandriva, PCLinuxOS as good starters though whatever keeps you hacking away happily is all good. Heck, if you find yourself back infront of Windows that's just fine too if it's an educated choice. Welcome to the real world Neo.

jarzola
jarzola

In mission critical world we want a solution that protects our interest, but at the same time if it fails we want to blame someone else for the fault. Using unsupported open source software will not work for any type of small business. If you want to start your business right, then get software that is supported, and tested. Open source software is for the person that really needs to use it due to budget, but once they have the money to pay for supported software they run to the phones or the store to get it and that is a fact.

robo_dev
robo_dev

There are tons of apps that only run on Windows, and open source stuff is not idiot-proof. Open source is great, but often the level of tech expertise at a small business is zero. Can you expect a beauty salon owner to know how to edit pcap files? No. I support the computers at my local barber shop. His point-of-sale app runs on Windows only, so he does not have much of a choice there. He uses Intuit QuickBooks for accounting...unless I go in there and start writing apps, then he's stuck with Windows.

robo_dev
robo_dev

A simple SOHO router with it's all-inbound-ports-closed setup is perfectly fine for most of the small businesses I've worked with. A closed port on a $200,000 Cisco router is exactly the same as a closed port on a $20 Netgear router. When you buy a better router, you're mostly getting more processing power, features, better reliability, and support. So if the business needs to terminate 10 VPN connections or host a web server, then they need a better router that has more processing power and does stateful packet inspection, logging of connection attempts, etc. But if they have a few employees who surf the web or do email, then a cheap soho router will do fine. Don't go tooo cheap, at least buy a brand you've heard of, or buy a couple of spares for when a power surge fries one.

Kilroy199
Kilroy199

I've been a system integrator for years and have seen it all. But right now I'm the only It guy in a small company and use TrendMicro OfficeScan, easy to install and deploy without fancy policies like McAfee and Norton. Plus it includes a client firewall, real-time and on demand e-mail scanner, wireless and PDA/Smart Phone support too. It uses a web-based console available from any browser on the network. Just recently deployed PCTools SpyWare Doctor and have never seen such an effective tool before, highly recommended although no central management. Recently upgraded our 2003 domain controllers to R2 and use the latest version of WSUS for patch mangement.

joe
joe

Since I'm also working in a small business environment and greatly agree with your impression that Norton is simply making your workstation very very very slow. Why not try NOD32 which uses very little system resources. Kaspersky is also one of the good anti-virus software you can find. For me, antivirus is like going to a doctor - always have second opinion which is why it is also good to avail of the free anti-virus scans that is available and for this I recommend Bitdefender as they do get the job done plus install ADAWARE for the spyware. Hope this helps. Cheers!!!!

fmurphy
fmurphy

I am the owner of a tech services company that specializes in the SMB market. Our primary market is the 4-20 computer business. Unellen, I agree with your summary about AV pgms responding on a timely basis - however, you must moderate what you install. Meaning, if you install the Symantec "full blown" packages that inspect every byte of information coming into/out of your computer, then yes it will dog down severely. I will not name the specific products that are slow. All AV pgms are (or have the *potential* to be) slow and machine intensive. What I would recommend would be the Norton 2008 AV package. Yes earlier versions are pretty memory intensive but 2008 is leaner. Now take into consideration, most older machines have 256 meg of memory. In today's computing world that simply is *not* enough - a user should have at least *512* meg of memory. Unfortunately, users with 256 meg memory are just subject to the rules of today's applications and their resource greedy consumption of memory. Yes there are other AV pgms out there - your objective should be to evaluate what you want to protect and why you want to protect it (whatever the "it" is, most likely data on your system). Ask yourself questions like, where do I go on the internet that could cause potential problems, do I get emails that have attachments from clients or friends, do I want the overhead of a software firewall... the questions could go on. Your best bet would be to query at least two tech service companies in your area and ask them about their philosophy with regard to AV pgms. Then research on your own. In fact, unellen, if you want you can even contact me and I'll give you my 5.75 cents worth.

msharp
msharp

As an individual who does trouble shooting for sick small business systems, I recomend AVG's Pay for play version for businesses. It is inexpensive, seemless most of the time, and VERY reliable. www.grisoft.com I have installed it on hundreds of systems and I use it at home on my business and personal networks.

Avn
Avn

What I find usefull: - Panda is a very good AV: no central admin but very good as firewall and antivirus and not too resources consuming. So to me ideal for SMB - don't make users local admin, this is often more useful than antivirus

Jaqui
Jaqui

without those, there is no need of software at all :p

dawgit
dawgit

major piece of malware, users. Those types can screw-up anything. :p -d

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I gotta ask, what was the app he compiled last week in his basement? Was it something that's going to run a business or a little app for a specific itch he wanted to scratch? Heck, if it's something cool or usefull to more than just him then share the link. Or do you install every little win32 app he builds in his basement on your gramdma's computer too?

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

take another look at a liveCD and you may notice that they are even more of a complete system that Windows "out of the box". Your grandma would likely have no trouble switching. Install one of the above distro liveCDs, deliver the machine and it'll just run and run while she reads email and checks the local weather websites. It's only us techie types that have switching issues and that's purely due to "but that's not how I do that same function in Windows" mentality. As for support, RedHat seems to provide support, Cononical also seems to provide suport directly. Consider a Dell and you don't even have to do the install yourself. If your grannie installs the OS and applications herself under Windows then that's a whole other discussion but one that only supports my point since she'd obviously have the tech knowledge to use support forums herself. I'm starting to think that it's your knowledge of FOSS offerings that makes them the wrong choice not any technical merit they may offer. (Sidenote: no disrepsect meant to you Grandma, I'm sure she's a lovely lady.)

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Granted, it may mean hiring a consultant but a small business is likely to do that regarless of OS religion choices. It is true that your OS choice is usually based on what supports the software you need to run your business but if you have a cross platform application you need to consider all options not just the pretty brandname that everyone blindely believes is the best or only option. Now what you really want is for the software not to fail. If your planning for failed software by looking for a name to blame they your already going about it backwards. Setup of any IT solution for a business should be done by someone skilled at the task so it doesn't matter so the owner need only be able to operate the applications after delivery. In that regard, you install a BSD or Linux based os and it runs.. you don't even need the MS required daily reboot to keep it stable (weekly for servers but still). OSS is not at all for the person who is limited by budget; it's for anyone and everyone who values product quality over merketing budgets. Sometimes the best solution isn't the most expensive one if you must focus on the license cost. I think it's sad that the best you seem too believe a company can hope for is to run with limited budget only long enough to then turn around and be gutted by Microsoft accountants (or whatever high cost solution is applicable). Don't get me wrong, I'm not talking blindly from the other side of your fence. The publisher I support runs win32 workstations because that's what the publishing software requires but in the case of the storage and web servers; high cost solutions with pretty marketing posters are not the better solution. (thanks to Samba, we manage to make MS play nice with the machines that respedect industry standards). I have also had clients where a BSD or Linux based OS was not the better fit so I'm not saying that it should be forces on someone to meat some idealogue's goals. I'm not going to say MS is never the solution but I'm also not going to agree that it's the ultimate solution once a company turns enough profit to downgrade for a high license fee.

dawgit
dawgit

and I'm not sure I want to know what he was doing in his basement. No, I would be refering to the former, something like that fro a Red Hat, or (what used to be) SuSE, or Sun, or IBM, or... does LAMP ring a bell? My-SQL, a data base SMB friendly. The list goes on forever. MS is one way, but not the only way, and certainly not the least expensive way. As for assistance, that would depend on your location, no matter what you choose. -d

jarzola
jarzola

Are we talking about supported open source like Red Hat and SUSE or are we talking about what my brother build last week in his basement and posted on the community site? There is a big difference... Tell me which will you install run in a production envinroment.

dawgit
dawgit

those 'gators' got your brain. And your "Facts" aren't. In case you haven't noticed (it seems you are in some sort of time lock down there) "Open Source" is and has been rather main stream on many Major systems world wide. Especially quite of few with billions more than your little operation will ever see. Sorry, your rant don't fly in these parts. -d

jarzola
jarzola

Tell my grandmother that or your grandmother for that matter!

Jaqui
Jaqui

for proprietary software, not when its outsourced and the "support" is just reading from a list of things to try. better support on the open source distro community site than that.

jarzola
jarzola

We are not talking in reality here. We are talking about peace of mind, you missed the entire point. The point is that people need support that an open source software cannot provide. My grandmother who has used windows since windows was in dipers, will expect the same type of support out of an open source software. If they caneaslity make a phone call to fix the problem then good. That is the blame game that I am talking about, not liability.

Jaqui
Jaqui

since no software company will accept any sort of liability going with proprietary leaves you in exactly the same situation if it fails, no BLAME possible. no damages reclaimed wake up, all EULA deny any liability.

jarzola
jarzola

I agree with you on all levels. Small business need small solutions and uncomplicated solutions at that. If Windows is working for them then we need to leave it just the way it is. You are right it makes no sence to write a software that would take me 2 to 3 weeks to complete when they can start taking business with something that they can buy and install right away. The overhead is there at first, but if you have a good business solution/plan it will be only a matter of time when your invesment pays off.

unellen
unellen

For all your good advice. It's also been suggested to do the 30 day free trial for a number of these software options that are out there and maybe going with the best one that suits my needs. This list you've given me is a good starting point anyway, a couple of which I've used on my other computer that I don't use for the business, so I have an idea of how they're going to work already.

votary.of.truth
votary.of.truth

I have tried many, believe me, many anti virus softwares. AVG was probably the worst among the famous ones because people get drawn to it thinking ok this one is famous, it has to be good. The fact = its not !! -->I now user Kaspersky - to me its the best because: *Complex settings and options for those who love to configure/customize their softwares *Hourly updates. *It scans like an AV should ! believe me it sweeps through the files thoroughly. *Not so much a resource hog as Norton or McAfee -->NOD32 is equally good too but Kaspersky is what i use. Im totally against Norton and McAfee - No good softwares. Anyone can take up this challenge - on a system using Norton/McAfee, install Kaspersky and do a full scan and be amazed!

jarzola
jarzola

I recommend the business version of NOD32 by http://www.eset.com/ AVG is just not the type of antivirus needed to protect my small business. Industry leading software like NOD32 will actually protect your computer from harm at only a mere 40 dollars. They have won awards after awards from leading security companies. They are in the background not marketing their software, but they also have a very robust enterprise solution that only symantec can match.