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10 worthy charities for the Internet age and the holiday season

The Internet has made charitable giving easier and more transparent. Here are 10 worthy charities for the 21st century and a holiday challenge.

At the risk of sounding like a narcissistic douchebag, I'm going to quote myself here. Well, I'm not really quoting myself as much as linking to myself, and I hope the fact that it's for a good cause will help counterbalance the narcissism of that.

I wrote a post for my personal blog this weekend called Take my holiday challenge: Contribute $25 to 3 of these 10 worthy charities, and afterward I was so excited about the post that I thought I should share it with my readers on TechRepublic because I know there are a lot of generous people here who already give to good causes and are interested in hearing about new ones.

In my post, I mentioned that "The Internet has transformed charitable giving by making it simpler to contribute, more transparent to see how charities spend their money, and easier to learn about how your contributions are helping people." And then, I highlighted 10 charities that take advantage of the Internet age with a good website that makes it easy to donate, a presence on social media such as Twitter and Facebook, etc. Here's my list:

  1. Kiva
  2. Charity: Water
  3. Blood:Water Mission
  4. World Food Programme
  5. Susan G. Komen for the Cure
  6. International Justice Mission
  7. Doctors Without Borders
  8. Red Cross and Red Crescent
  9. Heifer International
  10. Feeding America

If you're interested in seeing why I chose each one and get a link to each charity's website then you can read the full post. I hope some of you will also take my challenge and contribute $25 to three of these charities (or other worthy charities like the Linus Project or Wounded Warriors) this holiday season. If you aren't able to donate this year but would still like to help then you can share the post with your friends to help spread the word.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the book, Follow the Geeks.

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