iPad

101 screenshots of useful Apple iPad apps

Plenty of business leaders and knowledge workers are putting the Apple iPad to work as a business tool. Take a look at the apps that make it possible.

Straight out of the box, the Apple iPad provides business users with an instant-on computing experience, a full-screen view of email and calendar, and much better battery life than most laptops. While those features alone are enough to attract some users, the iPad's application platform is opening up a lot of additional possibilities that are enticing to business leaders.

As ZDNet reported in May, a number of prominent CEOs are talking up the iPad and turning into unpaid evangelists.

For instant analysis of tech news, follow my Twitter feed: @jasonhiner

Here are some of the useful business tasks that executives and professionals are doing with the iPad:

  • Viewing reports and dashboards
  • Tracking projects and tasks
  • Visualizing ideas
  • Taking meeting notes

To help businesses and IT departments find and evaluate useful iPad apps, we've put together a screenshot gallery of apps that do the four tasks mentioned above as well as other business functions. You can click the image below to go straight to the gallery.

The following is the list of apps from our screenshot gallery, including links to their iTunes page:

  1. Roambi Visualizer
  2. Analytics HD
  3. Quick Chart XL
  4. SAP BusinessObjects Explorer
  5. QlikView HD
  6. Evernote
  7. SoundPaper
  8. iMeetingPad
  9. Note Taker HD
  10. Daily Notes
  11. Idea Boards
  12. Penultimate
  13. Instaviz
  14. iThoughtsHD
  15. Outliner
  16. Adobe Ideas
  17. iMockups
  18. OmniGraphSketcher
  19. Todo
  20. TaskTaskHD
  21. Sorted
  22. ToDo Map HD
  23. Project Pad
  24. GoToMeeting
  25. WebEx
  26. iAnnotate PDF
  27. Soulver
  28. XpenseTracker
  29. 2Screens Presentation Expert
  30. Art of War for Business

Also read

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

28 comments
Poloid
Poloid

My essential business app on iPad to organize my work is Beesy. It helps me to organize my day with tasks, toDo list automatically generated. Very useful also in meetings to don’t miss a thing. It can record, take a picture, and gives the possibility to draw on your pictures saved. I hightly recommend it http://www.beesapps.com/beesy-ipad-to-do/

pedrosalas423
pedrosalas423

i am sure its not only me...millions people arond the world love it one of the most exciting on Ipad is they have many apps I can download everday

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

And yet all these wonderful apps, which you must pay for and some very dearly, are generally available for other devices/smart phone and tablet PC's for free or very low costs. There are some great apps, the SAP mobile is a great app (very expensive package to have it work with the office). SAP is also revising the ENTIRE mobile suite of tools, which should be released shortly in full, to offer even greater user features for ALL mobile devices. I think in that particular case, Apple is just looking to sell an app that will very quickly be overshadowed by their full mobility suite, meaning PAY AGAIN. Without going through all the apps individually, as many do the same thing anyway, they are mostly apps that are free for mobile devices anyway, and not unique to i-Phone/i-Pad in at all. As always, Apple tries to make the norm seem unique, but that's how they market their products. Release something later than everyone else, pretend it is superior and sell every add-on you can possibly imagine. Soon after, it is out of date and just plain expensive. It reminds me of the old cartridge console days, you buy a machine at top dollar, pay for all those bloody cartridges and a year later it is obsolete and you start from square one again, buy the latest machine and start buying cartridges....and so on. i-Pods were/are not unique and actually far substandard to competitive players), just guerrilla marketed. i-Phones, same thing, Far from unique, outdated before they are even released, expensive apps and simply guerrilla marketed as being unique and cutting edge, same goes for i-Pads. the part I don't get is how, after all these years of getting screwed with outdated devices, expensive apps etc., people STILL get sucked in and some have done so since the i-Pod came out. If you notice, I haven't mentioned MAC's. MAC's, while very expensive DID offer a unique and more stable user experience, great processing abilities etc. But even they are becoming less and less exciting as Windows offers more stable, more resourceful and more feature filled products, with a LOT more free applications and without the proprietary mature of the system. i-Tunes, i-Phones, i-Apps etc. are simply an unnecessary cash grab from the most trend driven nation on the planet.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

What with this articles title, site size and the links Apple will be pleased today.

brian
brian

Is anyone here developing applications for clinicians for patient intake and medical research/studies? We are doing that now and it would not take much to port to the interface to the iPad.

SgtPappy
SgtPappy

Just trying to get used to the name.

GoodOh
GoodOh

You make all these assertions about Apple wanting to sell these apps. You do understand that Apple doesn't write most of the apps don't you? These are independent companies who invest their own money and effort into writing an app. Apple is the sole retail channel but they take a cut they don't set the price. If the independent firm sets the price at free what cut does Apple get? I am not saying the iTunes/iPhone/iPod/iPad ecosystem is perfect or even that it is better than the competing models. All I am saying is that a lot of your points, as I read them, vary enough from the facts that they lose most of their power. Without a single mention of the companies who write the apps and banging on about Apple as though they are the authors of the apps means it does seem that you are missing the point. Perhaps it's just a communication thing and the imperfection of writing and reading as a way of passing on concepts but, seriously, to make a good point one has to reflect the facts as they stand. As a trivial example. One of the apps highlighted in the article is evernote. This is free on the devices you mention and free on the iPad. So your 'these are free on other devices' point is true but that's hardly worth mentioning for those that are also free on the iPad. It's a 'so what' point in that case. Anyway, as I said. You have a point. Just that a little more reflection of the facts, or possibly a tighter focus on the specific apps would help you make it a better point. And just to clarify a point that seems to have passed you by. The common agreement of most analysts is that the competitors to iPod were, and in some cases are (Zune anyone) technically superior hardware. The point that these firms missed was the integration into the iTunes marketplace. It was iTunes that made the iPod a success. Not that iPods were better hardware. So you are making a point that has been accepted a hundred times before but is missing the important point. Why does the Zune, with a arguably better ecosystem for content, not yet succeed? That's interesting. Whether the Creative Zen was better hardware than the iPod is not interesting. It is a dead argument that misses the point of what has been happening in this space for 5 years now.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

These types of links used to only open in iTunes itself. At least they open in a browser now and you can easily cancel the iTunes open if Firefox is your default browser, for example. That lets users evaluate the thing and then decide if you want to go to iTunes.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Even last year (or was it the year before) Steve Jobs specifically pointed out a number of apps for the medical profession, including a number of hardware gadgets that could attach to the iPhone to make it a diagnostic/monitoring aid. I would expect that there would be at least some reference in the App Store and possibly elsewhere. I have to admit, though, that I do not find the app store all that intuitive to browse/search through.

jkiernan
jkiernan

You could develop it as a web app. It wouldn't be limited to iPad for deployment - any desktop, notebook, netbook, even a lowly iPod Touch, would work.

gavin142
gavin142

dunno how easily you could "just port" it over as the app would have to be completely written in apple's mandated tools (per St. Jobs recent decree).

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

We're simply giving our members what they want. There's lots of curiosity about the device right now, and we're trying to provide some perspective on it from the business and IT angle. Coverage will naturally die down over the next couple months.

dstoltz
dstoltz

This program is waaay, waaaaaay, overpriced - but, it is awesome. Get your ideas in order, or plot your flow of a process, or layout a webpage.... I love it (but hated the price).

gpernest
gpernest

I believe Schedulicity is in the process, if not already completed, an iPad interface. Check out Schedulicity.com.

imsoscareed
imsoscareed

Maybe Apple doesn't write all of the apps but you can be guaranteed Apple makes money of of every app sold.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Now you just need a hat fit it. Seriously! Of COURSE the apps are third party, and only available through the Apple approved applications store. IE: You write code, Apple makes a commission from selling it...why? Other platforms allow the engineers to market and sell their own code, not Apple because they want a cut too, for some reason. In a PC world, people are free to write and offer their own apps, at no cost or whatever they want to charge for it, just as they have done for years now. Apple wants to "approve" apps and then sell them through THEIR special little store. Welcome to i-junk hell. You are nuts if you think Apple doesn't set a price. The fact that companies NEED to pay Apple to sell their apps determines the price they charge, obviously that same app made available directly would be at a far lower to no cost at all, it's just like buying direct from a manufacturer instead of a retailer. Many companies offer mobile versions of their software for free or at much lower costs, in the PC world, because it helps them sell their PC software, no such luck with apple, they have to make their money on the mobile apps alone. Simple marketing for you there. Much of what Apple sells, others offer free, simple enough? I made no mention or even slightest indication that Apple writes their own apps, we all know they are simply a marketing company, I just said that the same mobile apps for Windows mobile, Symbian etc. based devices are generally free or very inexpensive, in order to promote their full PC platform versions. Not too many companies will provide apps solely to make their millions from mobile devices alone, the big bucks are in selling full blown software/server versions or even desktop versions, the mobile apps are just the free 'teasers' and add-ons. As for communication and presenting facts as they stand, get real. FACTS are; Apple charges for what others offer for free, pretty simple concept. To add to that, most of their apps are not cutting edge and better can be found at no cost. You don't seem stupid so I am sure you can grasp that. I also agreed that some apps ARE free on i-Pad, perhaps I typed it in Jugandghu or misspelled a word but there is NO NEED for an i-Store except that Apple wants to command what users get and take a piece of the cash pie on every turn too. I also explained that I didn't go through each app individually, but that the entire concept is simply flawed from the get go. A consumer rip off. i-tunes didn't slip me by at all, in fact it is being locked into i-tunes that [i]makes[/i] i-Pods such terribly limited devices. 128kbps? What about FLAC? What about dynamic content? It seems that nobody has ears anymore, or at least nobody that drives North American consumer electronics sales. Over compressed media that sounds as good as a 40 year old 8-track with coke spilled on it? Puh-lease! Face it the MP3 format is for the nearly deaf, it is horrendous over compression that simply takes the MUSIC out of the music. What's been "happening in the space for 5 years now", is that people have become deaf to audio. Kids these days wouldn't understand audio dynamics if it hit them in the face, thank you Apple and guerrilla marketing! People have become dumbed down to audio and have no idea what they are missing. Right from the sound desk, producers release low end garbage that they KNOW is junk...but to the dumbed down listener, they gobble it up anyway due to marketing. I have seen (and grudgingly released myself) poorly produced demo tracks to stores that sell like hotcakes due to listeners with no ears, however 10 years ago it would never have been released to begin with, just not up to standards of the listener. It's like K-Tel records all of a sudden taking over from Telarc of Chesky for audio recording quality. You can pass off such shite in North America, but most others demand more than marketing from their audio. In short, Apple is just more consumer rip off garbage; i-Pads, i-Pods, i-Phones, i-Store, i-Apps etc, just pure marketing without validity or quality. Substandard crap for market morons to gobble up. People are begging for the Samsung P3, people search worldwide for the latest decent players but, as idiots feel that i-Pods are a better value for money (make that TRENDY), the retailers in North America drop all the more worthy devices and follow the consumer trends. There are better devices and they are sought out, just not by the moronic, brainwashed masses that seek out i-Toys due to Apple's marketing. Consumers are conversely dumbed down to buy into the media hype and get sucked into marketing hype, without the brains to actually research and find the merits of better devices themselves. Mindless consumers dominate the North American retail industry as always. It's like another zombie movie waiting to happen.

su3264
su3264

You have obviously never bought Adobe graphics software! :) I'm sure you appreciate it is all about market forces, that's what determines the price of anything. If it succeeds the price was right, if it bombs, it was too expensive and no-one bought it. What would you say to a client or employer who said YOU were great, but too expensive? Just thought I'd ask...

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

You seem to feel there was a lot more passion in my post then there ever was. First, I am not slamming Apple for making money. I support fair corporate practice and and much more conservative than you seem to feel. I am simply laughing at their practices whilst saying why I personally don't believe in their devices. Point: The main article is another pro i-gadget post from Jason. It is about a list of cool apps for i-stuff. My initial comment was simply that all of the software they offer is available for other toys already. Available without a proprietary access and payment system, this limits apps as companies need to pass Apple's test in order to market their products. Another poster, much like yourself, jumped on the personal defensive and attacked my comments whilst completely misreading what was said. (sloow breaths, staying calm? Ooooohhhhhm!) I reiterated myself and furthered my point by describing a shoddy marketing practice that most people just don't seem to see through. You chose your device after trial and error, thought it out made a qualified decision based on your needs. You are an exception to th erule though when it comes to such marketing tactics. Yes I've been pushed to release (or offer my part in the premature release) of music in North America, it's not like I get the final say. I'd rather reengineer it and THEN release it but that isn't always up to me. Lastly; What you pay, you justify to yourself. That doesn't overreach my right to offer my opinion in a web forum. I didn't attack you directly or personally, you choose to accept your role as the victim and then have your own little rant about what I said (or at least what you thought was being said). So have a Coke and a smile and.... Don't be so bloody serious, it's all just a laff and a jumble of personal opinions.

whiplashm1
whiplashm1

You sit there on your high horse and slam Apple for selling what you claim is inferior garbage, yet you do the exact same thing with some rotten musical recording and laugh? What makes you any better than them, or them any worse than you? I am so tired of every article turning into a thread bemoaning the idea that these companies are making money. They're making money because they have something people want. People who want it go and spend what they think it's worth to have it. If people don't think it's worth the price, they don't get it. Here's where it gets complicated... Why do those people insist on sitting on the sidelines yelling at the players? If the price tag is too high for you, go find something cheaper or don't get one at all, but to sit there and insult the intelligence of an entire society is nothing more than childish drivel. I don't care how many big words or obscure 'facts' you fill it with, the fact remains that the sentiments are products of nothing more than the insecurities of a crybaby. I'm a 45 year old man. I have an iPhone. I've had Windows Mobile devices, I've had Palms, and I support Blackberries in a corporate environment, yet I chose the iPhone to carry in my pocket on my off-days because it simply does what I ask it to when I don't want to think about how to make it happen. I don't care who makes it, who markets it, how it's marketed, or who gets paid. I pay what I feel it's worth to me because it simply does what I ask of it without giving me any trouble. If it doesn't do what you ask of it, then don't get one, but for heaven's sake just shut up about it, alright?

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

That is the most BIZARRE reply I have ever read (not yours). And I said NORTH American, meaning the marketing machine including both Canada and the US, not "AMERICAN" as you choose to see yourself. There's no question that of all the countries on Earth than Canada and the USA (both are North American countries)are a 100%, trend driven joke. Marketing to the masses here is SO easy it is not even a skill anymore. Any fool can sell something here, ANYTHING for that matter. I was just laughing to a friend the other day, who just got a key broadcasting gig here, about music marketing. I was telling him about a release that we put on the air a few years back, it was the most horrible quality demo track, had awful tone, was completely one dimensional, full of musician's mistakes that hadn't been sorted out, had a long delayed ping to the snare that made it almost painful (much like the last Metallica release had)and wouldn't have been picked up by any label in the world. We laughed when it was aired it was THAT bad. It turned out selling tens of thousands of copies and going into 4th run demands, mainly in California. A few years back I pointed out that Sony was going to be releasing a back catalogue Enrique Iglasias track on a local pop station and that within 3 weeks every kid in North America would be buying Enrique Iglasias CD's. I can see my 80 year old mum being into it but when the younger crowd starts saying "hey he's great!" it's laughable. Yes he IS very talented, but his music was NEVER targeted to that generation and they would never go out and buy it or even tune it in otherwise. It was just a cash grab at a crossover market. My friend just laughed and said , "Dude, there is NO WAY kids will buy that!" Next thing you know it is in a 3 hour rotation and kids are out buying it in droves. BACK catalogue crap just resold by rotational marketing to trend drones. Yesterday we were talking and he realized the same thing had happened again, not with a back catalogue but an artist that local manager Bruce Allen repackaged with a trendier song for the pop masses. NOW, big band 'Michael Buble' is in the top 10 on a 'POP' radio station and kids are running out and buying Buble like it was some hot new idea. Even bruce Allen laughed about it on a morning spot he does here from his studio The Warehouse (when he's on town). Buble has been playing mainly to women over 50 for years now but hey, throw out a few TV specials, a few guest appearances and SATURATE the radio with it and people go and buy it, people who would never actually consider the genre and will most likely NEVER buy a big band track or seek out a similar artist in their lives. As soon as the rotation is changed it is "Michael who?" Most of the people listening to it on the radio and downloading it from i-Tunes don't even know what Big Band music is! We simply live in the dumbest, trend driven, consumer market on Earth. People that move from here to other continents notice it right away, people listen to what they want to, buy the electronics they want to, wear what they want to and it is all interesting and true to the individual, not mass marketed garbage that people buy and wonder what he hell made them do it a few weeks later. All because North American consumers are lead like lambs to the slaughter so many times people don't know how to be original and think for themselves anymore, this also stems right down the line into politics, morals, political correctness, recycling, human rights, you name it. This is a purely media driven society we live in, one unlike any other in the world. People would buy shite on a stick if it was mass promoted to them. This market is EASY pickins, no individuality, just trend followers and drones.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Your personality analysis skills are simply laughable, your reply is pure rubbish. You parrot on about complex problems? We are discussing marketing from Apple's standpoint, which is anything but a complex problem. First of all there's no "problem" to be solved. Secondly it is far from complex, it is sales and marketing 101. Fodder for trend driven fools, this isn't writing code to solve some daunting business issue, it is plain old sales BS. What's all this about it not supporting my argument? WHAT argument? I merely understand marketing and Apple's BS is so transparent it should only fool small children, not masses of drone adults who try to see something more than is really there. You rebuttal is 100% rubbish with no applicable context, no meaning whatsoever and no relevance or even vague accuracy. Now go sit in your cube and think outside of the box for your boss, perhaps he/she will appreciate your absolute trollop. Your 'attempt' at offering an educated/intellectual reply is a complete joke! LOL :D What a fool!

santeewelding
santeewelding

And, I largely agree with it, except the "American" shilt. [b]GoodOh[/b], your tormentor, was that. Well done, but persnickety.

GoodOh
GoodOh

This is all you needed to say: "the entire concept is simply flawed from the get go" You have no interest in understanding what is happening and why. You start from the answer and present what you think supports that result. Hope it gives you a warm feeling. I'd rather discuss and understand the dynamics of things. But starting from the answer is so much less intellectually demanding isn't it? You can ignore any fact that doesn't support your argument but don't expect anyone to be convinced by that sort of approach to complex problems. I thought simplistic answers to complex questions went out of fashion when George W Bush went out of fashion but perhaps some things are too easy to?be given up even when they cease to provide value.

dstoltz
dstoltz

Well, I obviously bought it, so I thought it was worth it. Yes I've purchased Adobe products. Trust me, I know the prices, and value of software. My point was that comparitively speaking, it's expensive. Most apps, are less than $10. I said most, so please don't say well there's some that are $20 blah blah blah. If you read the reviews for that specific product, most agree with me. We're not talking about a PC or MAC full blown product here. These are apps on an iPad, that are to some degree stripped down, and have many less features than a fullblown PC app, so people expect to pay a little less for them. You can disagree, but those are the facts.

SgtPappy
SgtPappy

...you get what you pay for.

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