Microsoft Surface

17 photos of what Microsoft Surface can do


Get a look at Microsoft's newly-announced multi-touch computer interface in this gallery of 17 photos of Microsoft Surface.

Surface is currently aimed at consumer products in the hospitality and retail space, but could this new interface eventually spill over to SMB and enterprise technologies? How could you see this being implemented in businesses? Join the discussion.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

12 comments
FunkyAdMiN
FunkyAdMiN

Well, at least theres new things on the horizon to try and crash....... That's the best way to learn anything new. Just beyond that, It creates more opportunity for Hackers/Security writers and the lot of them that follow suit, especially in the service industry (restraunts and hotels $$$$$). Always fun....

rsoly777
rsoly777

This is not new technology, ESRI has been using this technology to integrate with their mapping software for a couple years now. In fact they also have a product that is similar but will extrude the map terrain out of the table top for a 3d map. It is really cool!

SuperNinjaDeathForce
SuperNinjaDeathForce

I haven't seen any comments anywhere as to how this could be of benefit to handicapped individuals, but I could totally see my son with autism using this kind of interface. Typing, at this point for him, is out of the question. However, he is facinated with computers, videos and video games and is very good with exploring things with his hands.

NWeber
NWeber

Since I work in a school, I see great educational potential for this. A great tool for hands on learning, or an aid for visual learners. Of course, my eventual question is the same one all school administrators ask. How much is this thing gonna cost us?

bradgalliford
bradgalliford

It could help with many handicapped people, as well as our older generations, keep their minds sharp. Anyone with limited use of their fingers will always have a hard time with modern day computers.

skicat
skicat

I saw this demo on the Today show (video replay) and I am very impressed. I like the idea of this working in a bar atmosphere where it is hard to hear. You order your drinks or appitizers the way you want and if you decide to split the bill with 2 or 10 people, you can do it w/ out upsetting the waitress. Great home purposes also. I am just wondering about the durability of the screen.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Microsoft Surface is currently aimed at consumer products in the hospitality and retail space, but could this new interface eventually spill over to SMB and enterprise technologies? How could you see this being implemented in businesses?

DadsPad
DadsPad

with the surface hardened to put objects on it, interactive meetings could be improved. It is large so everyone would be in front of it. Especially if hooked to a network, would elimintate these laptop presentations with projectors. Do not see this on desktops, neck strain would be a problem. Dad

NWeber
NWeber

I don't know. I think this would be something a digital artist (like myself) would drool over. Can you imagine using Photoshop, Paint, or OpenCanvas on this? Yet, just as artists in the traditional medium use drafting tables, so too would you require a low built, tilted tabletop for comfort during use. I think the ergonomics people would go for the challenge.

bradgalliford
bradgalliford

Hum.. Looks like they are at it again? At least this time they did a little more then just change the logo. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M0ODskdEPnQ Saw this almost a year ago and flipped out! I was stoked.. THIS was new, different and MUCH more innovative. Vista is flashy, but it is windows to the core. (just because you take the word "Start" away does not mean its not there!) I use XP, I love XP as a windows os. Best ever. However, I do not like the fact that Microsoft is claiming that they are revolutionary in their products. Vista does not change the way we use computers, it just changed the amount of RAM we need in them. Surface is cool, and if they were the 1st to invent it, I would be even more stoked then I was a year ago when I saw the 3d desktop demo. But alas, all Bill knows how to do is take a good idea from someone else and market it.

Rndmacts
Rndmacts

A piece of software that runs on a tablet PC is not revolutionary, the program you were so stoked about a year ago was a ripoff of software that was available way back in Windows 3.1. Milan has been in the works for 5 years and is all new technology, it is not a touch screen such as HP markets, Apple has shown. If you had bothered to read the specifications you would have realised what a revolutionary step that Milan Surface Computing is. See if you had even used Vista, you would realize that the interface or the OS is not the product, it is indeed the hardware that has never been done before. There are similar demos out there but never one with the potential that Milan holds. Others have used touch screens and tablet software on the OS, but Milan is totally the hardware that is unique.

bradgalliford
bradgalliford

Again, nothing REVOLUTIONARY its just making a product that has already been played with semi practical. As for Vista? Give me a break. I'm guessing you thing ME was pretty sweet too huh? Mark my words, 2 years from now people are going to cringe even more then they do know when a user says "I have Vista and my computer wont work" As for this software that has been around since 3.1, please let us know what you are talking about. I would be interested in looking at it to see what it was able to do.