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50% of IT pros recommend Android to users, 32% iPhone

IT professionals are decisively recommending Android over iPhone to company employees, according to a new poll of TechRepublic members.

As the trend accelerates toward employees choosing their own smartphones — bought with personal funds or subsidized by the company — IT professionals are having to recommend a lot more smartphones to employees rather than buying them in bulk and handing them out. These same IT pros are also the tech experts that their friends, family, and neighbors have always turned to for tech buying advice, and the issue of which smartphone to buy is now the hottest topic.

With that in mind, TechRepublic — which, of course, is one of the largest global communities of technology professionals — recently polled members and asked which smartphone platform they recommend to average users. Fully half of the 2,692 respondents said that they recommend Google Android devices, while 32% of them recommend iPhone.

This shouldn't come as too much of a surprise. Techies themselves tend to be more disposed to open platforms and platforms that allow you more control and customization, which is why Android is so popular as among technologists. However, there's also a certain faction of technologists that have taken to recommending Apple devices — especially in cities where there are Apple stories — because when people have problems with their devices and come back to the IT pros who recommended them, the techies can simply point them to the Apple Store.

Of course, the Android/iPhone split left BlackBerry and Windows Phone 7 to fight for the tablet scraps of the remaining 18%. Once the darling of IT pros, BlackBerry is now only recommended by 5% of them. That leaves 13% that recommend Windows Phone 7. While that may not sound like much, WP7 currently has only about 2% market share, so Microsoft should take that as an encouraging sign.

Here's the chart that shows the results:

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the book, Follow the Geeks.

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