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700 MHz auction has set the board for next gen wireless broadband in the United States

The FCC announced last week that the big winners in the 700 MHz auction of U.S. wireless spectrum were Verizon Wireless and AT&T. To get an analysis of the 700 MHz results and what they mean for the next generation of wireless broadband connectivity in the United States, check out this interview with Berge Ayvazian from the Yankee Group.

Podcast

To no one's surprise, the FCC announced last week that the big winners in the 700 MHz auction of U.S. wireless spectrum were Verizon Wireless and AT&T. To get an analysis of the 700 MHz results and what they mean for the next generation of wireless broadband connectivity in the United States, I spoke with Berge Ayvazian, Chief Strategy Office for the Yankee Group.

In this 15-minute podcast, you can hear Berge's take on:

  • The timeframe for when services will actually be available over 700 MHz
  • Whether Verizon will use its new spectrum for LTE or WiMAX
  • What this means for T-Mobile and for Sprint and its WiMAX plans
  • Whether the future of cellular voice calls are destined to migrate to VoIP
There are three ways to listen to this podcast:

  1. You can click play directly from the player on this page (you must have Flash installed)
  2. Subscribe to the podcast RSS feed with iTunes, Zune, Juice, or your podcast software of choice
  3. Download the podcast as an MP3

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

22 comments
wdtvandsound
wdtvandsound

With 700 MHz this will open things up for a much better stronger reaching coverage. With 850 MHz in Australia RE: Sanity check: Will WiMAX be a 3G killer, or is it vise versa? If you are in Australia wireless would blow your mind. Using (Ericson developed with Telstra)(on 3G based)Next-G 850MHz (same frequency as CDMA)(CDMA 3G hybrid concept)HSDPA here on the Next-G Telstra BigPond network, all devices use an enhanced SIM card called USIM card. Two for exsample a Modem router GateWay7.2 that can connect to 4 devices LAN ethernet or 20 on WiFi up to 3Mbp plus, also newly available a dongle that looks like a memory stick thats faster, you can get 8Mbps down and 3Mbps upload very reliably on the newly but limited eastcoast rollout (In theory)21.1Mbps network system Wireless. Ericson acheaved this on a test signal over a range of 200km. All (Next-G Mobiles)Cell phones are on, 7.2 soon to be upgraded to 21.1 network cards or Mobile broad Band covering 98.8% of australia!!!!This is as fast as the average metro phoneline!! In 2011 depending on rollout costs, the system will speedup to 41.1Mbps. You can connect your Next-G Telstra mobile phone in to your laptop PC via USB and connect as a dialup at a much greater cost per Meg. On the Mobile(Cell)phone wise you can brouse the net for free, Video call, check your email, use Where Is GPS,Watch PayTV (Fox-Austar), WiFi, all this with out drop outs in large buildings, train tunnels!! Soon we will have an Australian stimuless, a Government National Broard-Band Network rollout, called NBN that will replace most all the copper network with a fiber optic node network to every home and business.

snoengineer
snoengineer

what people want is resilient network, cheap, more bandwidth and open standard with full services.

chriss
chriss

Supposedly the FCC set a reserve price on the auction that if met would require an open network policy on the bandwidth. I believe I saw this was indeed exceeded so supposedly the current business model of these two mega-corps would have to be adjusted to meet that requirement. granted there is no guarantee that it will meet anyone elses definition of "open" so who knows. I never understood how you could justify selling "access rights" to your service for resale to customer as not maintaing a monopoly. You raise your price and they raise theirs so you still control the pricing as if it was a monopoly.

eblank
eblank

Yet with the winners of the auction, I cannot see any of the above actually happening. It is just not in the interest of tehse companies to charge anything less than all the market will bear. On one hand I can agree with philosophy. A company should have the right to profit from their services. On the other hand by limiting the winners of the auction to two established market giants the FCC has created a defacto monopoly. These "non-competing competitors" will have little to no interest in doing anything innovative or cost cutting because there will be no need to provide better service than their competitiors.

DadsPad
DadsPad

Now phones will need to be developed, hopefully multi frequency so can take advantage of what we have now and the advantages of 700mhz Should take years.

eblank
eblank

I would be VERY surprized if the new phones take more than a few months to be put out on the shelves. I would be extremely surprized if manufacturers havent been planning for this frequencey spectrum from the day the FCC announced that it would be auctioning it off. The MFGS have had all this time to plan for and put together entire product lines just waiting for a vendor. What annoys me about the whole mess is that once again two mega corps have managed to essentially create a monoploy over the air waves that create a bottle neck of information. Now it will be just that much easier to create illegal wire tapping of these new spectrums with less chance of people finding out about it.

Timbo Zimbabwe
Timbo Zimbabwe

... lookout for those black helicopters.

JCitizen
JCitizen

I suggested to my commander that we issue redeye missles to the local police. Haven't had any since. For those that doubt about them, they were running drugs and put about 60+ holes in one patrol car that was trying to spot light one on one night years ago..

eblank
eblank

"THEY" never use black hellicopters anymore. Too many people KNOW about them, man..... No, "THEY" are now using a Paisly fusia and Lime Green paint job to confuse the PEOPLE, man... :D

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Original post: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=621 What are some of the most important features you would like to see in the future of mobile broadband for phones, laptops, and other devices?

cathar.gnostic
cathar.gnostic

It will just add to encourage selling nothing. If the average guy had a technical understanding of RF then there is nothing to sell, it's a natural phenomenon, just the right to specifically generate the frequency above the background noise within a legal jurisdiction is all that can be sold. Sucked in again, ho hum..

cepedajoe
cepedajoe

There will be no impact for the very near future. There are no phones that can take advantage of this band so for now all we'll have will be vaporware. Eventually the phone manufacturers will decide to invest some capital in creating platform independent units and the cell phone carriers will make that service available. Because it will be free network bandwidth, there will be no infrastructure put in place to support it so the government will have to add some taxes to pay for this. Eventually the network will be in place and we'll then be back where we are now. When we want high speed internet access on the road we'll have to pay an arm and a leg for it.

ole
ole

The main consequence will be more money in the coffers of Verizon and AT&T and higher prices for cell service. These companies practice a protectionist business model with profit as the only motive. The rest of the World has open systems and free incoming calls. Their cell companies still make a decent profit. When will the American public wake up and demand better from government agencies entrusted with serving the interest of the public? There is wholesale abuse across the board of any communications regulated by the FCC. It's time for change!

paul.kelly
paul.kelly

I would gladly pay inflated cell costs, if in return i could get cheaper gas prices. Over here in the UK we're paying nearly $3 per litre!!! and yet nobody complains!!!

Timbo Zimbabwe
Timbo Zimbabwe

"I would gladly pay inflated cell costs, if in return i could get cheaper gas prices." Know why nobody complains? Because your country is not that big, relatively speaking. But still, how does the price of gas even compare to what we're talking about? Someone has got to complain about something, I guess....

steven_sebele
steven_sebele

not to sound like i dont appreciate your way of life, North america is simply a little bigger, and by little i mean alot, you could drive across your contry on a little over a tank of gas, for me to drive from ontario (not even the east coast) to the west coast it would be roughly 5000 KM. Not that i would, but even simple things like going to visit my parents is a 300km away. how often do you drive 300km? and yes yay me for polluting :(

uberg33k50
uberg33k50

Dude, isn't that like $11 a gallon? That really sucks! A side note to Forum Surfer...Steve Jobs is only "free thinking" for Steve Jobs...for everyone else he wants to think for them. That is why I could never get the love affair with the MAC.

eblank
eblank

*Tongue firmly in cheek Mode* Shocking! Are you suggesting the Mega-Corps in our fair minded country have anything but the best of intentions for the consumer? How Dare you suggest that these companies, who practice fair and open competitive business by suppressing competition, lobbying for special considerations from our governmental bodies and underhanded tactics, might actually seek to somehow prevent others from providing a better service than they? Shocked! Shocked I am at this notion! What, you want more REGULATION in the industry? We just succeeded in getting RID of all our monopoly preventing regulations that were stifling our great patriotic (to themselves) corporate governors! Next you will be suggesting that the populous as a whole should start marching in the streets carrying torches and pitch forks! Perhaps you will in your anarchists viewpoint will go so far as to suggest *shudder* a _Letter_and_Pettition_ campaign to change this fair and consumer friendly situation. *Rant mode off* Un fortunately, I feel that with the strangle hold that the mega-Corps have on American society now, the prospect for change is as remote as those torch wielding mobs marching on Verizons headquarters. *sigh*

ole
ole

The example of oil really does not apply here. Roughly 1/3 or the price of every dollar goes to investors who are speculating in oil futures. There is nothing government can do about that short of prohibiting investments in oil. But all I was asking of our federal and state agencies was that they enforce the law. That has not been happening to any significant degree lately. Enforcing existing laws is not communism last I checked. Actually what we have is just the opposite of communism. We have businesses controlling government. Either extreme is bad for you and me.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

/ranting in agreement/ I can't stand the way alot of companies have us by the wallet when it comes to service. There isn't much we can do except for whine and moan about it. I once lived in a remote area that only had 1 DSL provider with no cable service. It was dial up, dsl or satellite. Guess how much a 768 line was? $65 a month since they were the ONLY game in town. Still, it wasn't exactly a monopoly since any company was welcome to lease their over priced lines and provide me with service...so it was legal. And what about that snazzy new iPhone I'd like to have...except AT&T coverage is horrible in my area and the "wonderful, free thinking" Steve Jobs won't let me be a free thinker and install my own software on my iPhone. /end rant/ But seriously, if we let the government intervene too far with the business worl wouldn't we evolve into some sort of communist democracy? The government would control business as in communism, but we would be able to vote in new politicians/business leaders. We already have that with the oil industry, :) ...and it's not working so well for us.

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