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Acer Timeline: Don't buy a netbook, get this instead

Learn why a new breed of laptops such as the Acer Timelime series is gaining steam and why they often make a lot more sense to buy than netbooks.

When I wrote my article "MSI X340 Slim: The best laptop you've never heard of," several TechRepublic members responded by saying that a similar laptop in the same class was the Acer Timeline series. Both the MSI X340 and the Acer Timeline are part of what Intel calls its Consumer Ultra-Low Voltage (CULV) line of machines. These laptops are characterized by their thin, light designs, long battery life, and processors that can handle bigger loads than netbooks.

So, at the prompting of the TechRepublic community, I got a hold of an Acer Timeline and put it through its paces. Here are the pros and cons of the machine from a business perspective. See why it's a better choice than a netbook for many business users.

Also read: Netbooks are dead. Long live the notebook.

Specifications

  • Cost: $669 retail
  • Model number: Acer Aspire Timeline AS3810TZ-4880
  • Operating system: Windows Vista Home Premium (upgraded to Windows 7 Ultimate)
  • Processor: 1.3GHz Intel Pentium Ultra-Low Voltage SU2700
  • RAM: 4GB DDR3 1066
  • Hard drive: 320GB SATA (5400rpm)
  • Display: 13.3" WXGA LCD (1366x768 pixels) with LED backlight
  • Graphics: Integrated Intel GMA 4500MHD with 64MB dedicated video RAM
  • Video ports: VGA, HDMI
  • Other ports: 3 USB, microphone, headphone, RJ45
  • Networking: Gigabit Ethernet 10/100/1000; 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi; Bluetooth
  • Webcam: Integrated
  • Card reader: 5-in-1 SD/xD/MMC/Memory Stick
  • Dimensions: 12.67"(w)x8.97"(d)x1.13"(h)
  • Weight: 3.5 lbs (1.4 kg)
  • Battery: 6-cell Lithium-ion (up to 8 hours of battery life)
  • Acer Aspire Timeline official product page

Who is it for?

For business travelers and knowledge workers who want a highly portable laptop that can capably handle standard business applications and has enough battery life to last for a coast-to-coast flight across the U.S., the Acer Timeline machine is a solid choice.

It will cost $200-$300 more than most netbooks, but for most business users, the extra CPU power and battery life provide enough value to justify the cost. Plus, we're still talking about a pretty powerful machine for well-under $1000.

What problems does it solve?

The biggest drawbacks with netbooks have always been the small LCD screens and tiny, non-standard keyboards. The Acer Timeline eliminates those concerns by providing a standard laptop keyboard and a 13-inch 1366x768 screen. While the Timeline is a little wider than a netbook, it makes up for it by being thinner than most netbooks.

The other problem with netbooks is that the Atom processor that powers most of them tends to be pedestrian when it comes to multi-tasking and doing much more than Web browsing. The Timeline I tested was much snappier, even with its 1.3 GHz Pentium. And, some of the CULV laptops even have Core 2 Duo processors.

For more insights on netbooks and other tech topics, follow my Twitter stream: @jasonhiner

Standout features

  • Slim form factor - Portability is one of the factors that has fueled the success of netbooks. However, you don't give up much with a CULV system like the Acer Timeline. Again, the height and width of the Timeline is bigger than a netbook, but it is much slimmer and the weight is comparable.
  • 5+ hours of battery life - Even more than other CULV systems, such as the MSI X340 Slim, the Acer Timeline offers outstanding battery life. The marketing materials claim "8+ hours" of battery life. In my tests, I easily got up to 5-6 hours, enough to last an entire cross country flight in the U.S.
  • Solid performance - As mentioned above, the Timeline has a stronger processor than the Intel Atom that powers most netbooks. I didn't run into any slow-downs with standard business apps like Microsoft Office, and it handled multi-tacking with multiple apps with no problems.
  • Runs cool - Some laptops make it very difficult to use them in your lap because they run so hot. That's not the case with the Timeline. It has a special thermal-efficient cooling design that allows the Timeline to remain very cool and quiet. That said, I should also note that there was a recall on a select number of Aspire Timeline machines in 2009 due to a malfunction that caused an overheating issue.

What's wrong?

  • Small touchpad - With all laptops I typically use a wireless mouse because I do not to like touchpads. However, the touchpad on the Timeline AS3810TZ is particularly bad. The actual touch-sensitive area is really small and there's only one mouse button (you click the left side for left-click and the right side for right-click) and it tends to stick. The touchpad is also supposed to have special gestures (similar to the Mac laptops) but these did not work very well in my tests.
  • More expensive than a netbook - Most netbooks these days hover around the $300-$400 range, although business-class netbooks can cost $500-$600. The retail price of the Timeline I reviewed was $669. You'll find some Timeline models in the mid-$500 range, but most of these CULV systems will cost 20-30% more than netbook.
  • Product naming - The naming convention for the Acer Timeline series is overly complicated and it confuses users. There's a cryptic product line number (AS3810TZ) plus a four-digit code on the end (4880). This makes it tough for buyers - whether IT departments or individuals - and these product numbers tend to change quickly so it can become even more confusing and difficult to standardize if you have a large team, department, or company.

Competitive products

Bottom line for business

If you or your employees want a thin, light laptop with great battery life and enough horsepower to handle business applications, it's probably going to make a lot more sense to buy a CULV system like the Acer Timeline than to buy a netbook.

User rating

Have you used or supported the Acer Timeline? If so, what do you think? Rate the device and compare the results to what other TechRepublic members think. You can also give your own personal review of the Acer Timeline in the discussion thread below.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

97 comments
read
read

Not exactly on topic (except that this is a comment on Acer). I like the Acer Inspire platform with full keyboard. My 17.3" model (with Intel T6600 dual-core CPU) is probably too large for most travelers, but it is an excellent desktop replacement for me that I can use anywhere. The 15" model has the same keyboard but far fewer ports and other features. I have passed on all netbooks because I cannot type on them and am willing to give up on small size for a good built-in keyboard, and I do no travelling. If I need a device I cannot type on I would probably opt for a smart phone rather than a netbook size computer.

HAL_9000
HAL_9000

Here is a link to real life data from 30,000 new laptops. http://squaretrade.wordpress.com/ Not only is Asus the winner on reliability but their thin ASUS UL30A-X5 laptop offers: - It's on par with the price tag for Acer Timeline - Much more battery life than anyone else (up to 12 hours) - The CPU benchmark performance is 3 times of Intel Atom CPU's in most other netbooks - You get Windows 7 - larger screen size - Still well under 4 pounds To me this is the perfect balance between form size and computing power. http://www.amazon.com/UL30A-X5-Light-13-3-Inch-Black-Laptop/dp/B002P3KMVC I receive my new Asus tomorrow :-)

jrstatler
jrstatler

I upgrade the base HP Mini 110-1000 to the A230 processor that has hyper threading and shows up as two cores, a 10.1" 1366x768 LED screen, 6 cell battery and the Broadcom video accelerator for $484. The track pad has a button on each side, but the keyboard is decent.

mfelgenhauer
mfelgenhauer

Acer sucks, and 64mb of video? Seriously? That should say "no" right off the bat.

billfranke
billfranke

I've got an ASUS UL80 (14-inch screen) with a CULV chip. The specs are similar to the Acer Timeline you reviewed, but it cost me US$866. The ASUS N10 is not comparable to the Acer Timeline: it's last year's model. I've owned three ASUS EEE PCs (still have a 900 and a 1000H) with the Atom 270 CPU. The UL80 is substantially better than both of them for many reasons: faster, more powerful, bigger screen, better resolution (1366 x 768), standard-sized keyboard, and 64-bit-OS capable, for example. I hate touchpads, so I always use a mouse. My EEE PC 1000H netbook is still useful, especially when I don't want to lug the UL80 around. A 9-inch or 10-inch netbook is an ultraportable notebook that can be used for work (at least, I used to use them both for work), but I much prefer to use the UL80 because of its greater speed and power, and its larger screen and keyboard, but I wouldn't call my UL80 an ultraportable. Nor would I call the ASUS UL50, the model with the 13.3-inch screen that is comparable to the Acer Timeline you discuss, an ultraportable. It would be nice to see another article on this type of CULV notebook, but one that focuses on comparing the best five models rather than one that appears to be an advertisement for a particular brand.

JCitizen
JCitizen

I'll defer saying the word,'stupid'! Why in the H and E double LL would I want to spend $700 when I could get away with "good enough" with 200 to 300?!? I realize some folks think netbooks are just miniature notebooks, but even the folks who "get it" already know the limitations and we STILL want economy!!! NO MORE high dollar laptops for me! Hell - for 700 dollars I could buy [b]TWO[/b] netbooks and throw one away when it farts!! I think this article is a ridiculous suggestion when it comes to down to the brass tacs! Or should I say gold shekels still jingling in MY POCKETS!!! ]:)

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Wouldn't touch an Acer with a ten foot pole. Cheap systems because of cheap components or selling cheap [smaller hard disk low memory]. Someone I know bought a Vista system with 1GB of RAM. Who sells a system with 1GB of RAM? How dump for a web site? Go to the drivers. They list Vista Home Basic 64-bit and Win 7 Home Basic 64-bit. They were never available in 64-bit! A typical 10" netbook has a near normal size laptop keyboard. OK. So the screen is a bit off. Doesn't bother me. These are the only issuse that the article author mentioned. He's just anti-netbook then. Maybe je should give everyone $200 for them to buy a "normal" size laptop. :-)

Ron Kunce
Ron Kunce

Hmmm..., Did everyone here miss the performance comment of the Acer Timeline, Apparently the Timeline can "Multi-Tack", which must be a new performance feature I have never heard about before this. I am curious, is this a sailing reference indicating the Timeline can move in more than one direction at once? Since Jason Hiner is the Editor in Chief of TechRepublic, surely, it could not have been a lowly typo, and has to actually be some new feature that needs to be capitalized on more fully in order to sell Acer junk!

rsmastersjr
rsmastersjr

I fried another laptop a few weeks ago. I bought a Timeline off Tiger Direct shortly thereafter. What a machine for the money. This might be crazy talk but there's something to be said for having a virgin copy of Windows 7. It boots quick and runs quick. I like the full numeric keypad. The keyboard might be a little delicate. One of my dogs took her paw and ripped off the caps lock key the first day I had the thing. My replacement keyboard is on the way (on a slow boat from China, evidently).

ecdys-buy
ecdys-buy

Don't buy anything bigger than the size of a POQET computer MS dos computer of the '80S, weight = 20 oz., folded size = US letter, 5/8" thick, large enough for a very comfortable keyboard. The nearest thing to it, is the first ASUS netbook (701). Using an ATOM 270 it should be possible to devise such a mini PC having 5 hours battery life, 1366x680 screen, wi fi, USB. Essential to the POQET was the use of a Solid State Disk. All mini PCs should use SSDs, sturdy enough to withstand shocks. I wonder how much TechRepublic is being paid to denigrate NetBooks?

RodDimick
RodDimick

The Acer Timeline maybe a nice alternative but my Asus Eee netbook is 2.8 lbs, runs for 10.5 hrs, and costs half as much. Great for meetings where mobility and flexibility along with connectivity are requirements. Sure beats looking at a smart-phone screen and trying to run applications. The XP OS on this unit is a perfect fit - without all the overhead/services of Vista. Instead of netbook, maybe it should be called a netpad - it runs all MS Office apps. just fine. Oh yeah, its been dropped twice (on carpet) without damage. When the Timeline's price drops below $400.00 I will take a closer look!

The Admiral
The Admiral

The Acer series of anything has the cheapest parts in them. I had an Acer once, but it would not run Windows 98. Now, I am not a rocket scientist, but when you put a logo on it saying that it is designed for Windows 98, should it not run Windows 98? Acer has not attempted to shed it's throw anything into it, it will work - even if it's junk, and they have definitively have not shed their warranty problems. In my shop I will see 30+ Acers to one HP. What does that tell you? If it is sold at Wal-Mart, generally it is not a good place to buy. We had a fella who brought in his machine the day after Black Friday because it was broken. Yep, an Acer.

mckinnej
mckinnej

It's too big. If I'm going to make the jump from 10" to 13" why not go 2" more and get a regular 15"? Oh wait, that's what I got rid of to begin with...

skwrupb
skwrupb

You're missing the point of net books. I have several computers. My netbook is half the cost of the Acer above, half the weight, and very easy to travel with and/or carry. That's the advantage of a netbook. If I wanted a full-fledge notebook, it would fulfill a different need, a different purpose. There's no need to knock netbooks. They're successful b/c they answer a legitimate need.

aharper
aharper

...I am having a bit of trouble checking the internals of this laptop for Linux compatibility. It is a deal maker or breaker for my organization. We currently use Samsung NC-10s to good effect.

Spiritusindomit
Spiritusindomit

Acer isn't trustworthy. They're a cheapo brand who doesn't stand behind their products and in my experience has a massive failure rate. I'd go HP instead

Sysadmin/Babysitter
Sysadmin/Babysitter

I just installed a 128 GB SSD (Solid State Drive)in my laptop. My Battery life almost doubled, without the spinning platter of a standard disk drive. A $250.00 price special at Amazon saved me ALMOST $500.00 over your solution, and achieved the same results. Do you work on Commission???

frwagne
frwagne

We were looking for a laptop for my son for college, and the long battery life and a decent screen and keyboard were driving factors. The salesman at Fry's showed us the Acer with 14" screen and Core2 Duo processor and up to 8 hours battery life - we bought it, and added a wireless mouse. done deal!

john3347
john3347

The price, size and features of this computer (with the exception of optical drive) squarely places it in the same category of a "conventional" laptop computer. It should not have been singled out to compare with a netbook in terms of price, portability, capabilities, etc. Title should have read something like "Here's an alternative to a typical 14"or 15" laptop" and compared subject computer with those models. A netbook is a completely different animal and is suitable for a completely different pattern of use from a full feature portable computer. This issue is further complicated by the lack of a clear and precise definition of "netbook". I have a 10" Hannspree Hannsnote and, call it what you wish, it serves my need for easy portability and general, non-resource intensive computing FAR better than the 14" laptop that it replaced. Now - - let's define netbook, notebook, laptop, etc. and not try to make one product fit a market or fit a use pattern that it is not designed for or capable of. The product that is the object of this article is NOT a reasonable competitor for what a netbook is designed for and completely suitable for. That's my story, and I'm stickin' to it!

george.flecknell
george.flecknell

And this isn't a netbook because? Wikipedia- "Netbooks or subnotebooks (sometimes also called mini notebooks or ultraportable) are a rapidly evolving[1] category of small, light and inexpensive laptop computers suited for general computing and accessing web-based applications; they are often marketed as "companion devices," that is, to augment a user's other computer access.[1] Walt Mossberg called them a "relatively new category of small, light, minimalist and cheap laptops." [2] By August 2009, CNET called netbooks "nothing more than smaller, cheaper notebooks."["

dmies
dmies

My daughter is in college and needed a new laptop. Her primary requirement was to go all day on one charge so I got one of these Acer Timelines for her. The first one I bought had an annoying hiss from the speakers that was constant and could not be turned off so I returned it to the store where I purchased it. The next one appeared fine but after about a month of use the screen suddenly went all white. My daughter sent it to Acer for repair and they returned it promptly saying the display connection had come loose. About a month after getting it back, the display went out again. Acer replaced all the cables to the display this time. 2 weeks ago the display went out again! We are now asking Acer to replace the whole unit but they are resisting. All that said, the computer itself is very nice. It operates well and has a great LED display that is very sharp and easy to read. I agree with Jason about the touchpad but I also don't like them and use a wireless mouse. Personally I don't like the feel of the keyboard. The keys are all perfectly flat on top with no curvature. I find that my fingers get lost easily while typing. Before buying it I was a bit concerned about the speed of the processor (1.3GHz) but I really didn't notice much of a problem with most Office apps. It would probably be more of an issue with CPU intensive apps however. One other thing to not about these laptops. They come in 3 models with 13", 14", and 15" displays. The 14" and 15" models have DVD drives and some stores that I checked with had all 3 models for the same price (Fry's Electronics for one).

gs
gs

Jason, A well thought out piece, but I (respectfully) think that you are approaching it from the wrong side. I believe that the Timeline should be compared with a notebook, not a netbook. I have an HP netbook, and although it is not perfect, I much prefer it to a full notebook because it is much smaller, much lighter, and does everything I need it to do, i.e. handle MS Word and browse the Internet via WiFi. The keyboard is 92% the size, and although I have pretty big hands, I can manage typing at regular speed with only a few more missed keys than I do typing on a notebook. The touchpad works great, and the memory is all I need for light, writing-on-the-go work. At two and a half pounds, it is significantly lighter and easier to carry than the Timeline would be. Netbooks are not replacements for notebooks, in my estimation, just as the iPod Touch isn't a replacement for a full computer. Despite their similarities in looks, the netbook is a niche tool that was never designed to replace all the functionality of a notebook. I think what it does, it does well. I've never regretted my purchase of a netbook, and I am happy that I can grab it on the go rather than haul around a bulky notebook. I can let my desktop to the heavy lifting when I need it. ~Graham

techgecko
techgecko

Acer always has such wonderful ideas and offerings. I can't rate a Timeline because I won't buy another Acer product. I have had two Acer products expire days past the warranty period. Even with first hand evidence of similar experiences did Acer not even acknowlege a problem or offer any remediation. I have my fingers crossed that the only other Acer product I own, a netbook will make past 12 months of age. Fool me three times? Not.

marcedhk
marcedhk

So you're telling me that instead of a $300 Netbook with good battery life that can be used for emails, browsing and MS Office when on the road, which you don't have to worry too much about if it gets broken or stolen, and can be used with no trouble when stuck in a coach seat, People should get a $650+ Notebook that's heavier, will be hard to use in a coach seat, has a higher performance which many don't really need for their work. **Enraged rant begins** When are you going to get it through your head that the majority of business Netbook buyers are not the hard core always-multitasking-poweruser-techies that visit this site, they're the travelling sales reps and the like that don't need that level of performance? There are tons of users out there for whom buying a $300 Netbook plus an extra battery makes more sense! Right tool for the right job! I don't know how many analogies I need to give to make you wise up! How about this one - for millions of drivers looking for an SUV, a Toyota Highlander is just perfect - they don't need a Cadillac Escalade!! Do you get it now? Huh? Do you? **Enraged rant ends**

JCitizen
JCitizen

Thanks for the post! I have seen people dictating to their netbooks with voice, very successfully, but these folks admitted they couldn't type at all. I'm lucky - my fingers are slim enough I do pretty well on just about any sized keyboard. But, even on a regulation sized QWERTY keyboard I end up only using a few fingers because of the ubiquitous use of auto-complete technology everywhere! No need to complete much of a word or even a phrase with that tech in hand!

jskean
jskean

A good compromise between a $300 netbook and the UL30A-X5 is the Aspire 1410. UL30A: $700 SU7300 13.3 inch, 4GB DDR3, 500GB HDD, 12hr 8-cell battery, 12.9 x 9.28 x 0.98 in, 3.74 lb, Express Gate. Nice specs, but relatively expensive. A1410: $400 SU2300 11.6 inch, 2GB DDR2, 250GB HDD, 6hr 6-cell battery, 11.22 x 8.03 x 1.18 in, 3.08 lb. My daughter bought one for college and it seems just about adequate and fairly priced. Both have 1368x768 resolution, Win7 Home Premium (64 bit on UL30A), hdmi, and multi-touch trackpad. A 768 pixel high display will be my minimum requirement for all our future notebooks. The 600 pixel screen on the Aspire One is the limitation that bothers me most often.

JCitizen
JCitizen

there are some infinitely lighter, more portable units out now, in answer to this requirement that fit the bill better that this Acer product.

george.flecknell
george.flecknell

Netbook are bad for margin as they dont retail as high THEREFORE Online tech websites are encouraged (paid) to recommend more pricey alternatives even when their arguments are nonsense.

Answerfactory
Answerfactory

I guess I got more than I paid for, lol. My Acer laptop hasn't broken once in 3 years. I've decided is too big though, so I am getting an Acer Netbook next.

JCitizen
JCitizen

ASUS Eee!! The news line should say! Why waste your money when this does it just as good, for 99.9% of what I actually need, and better, lighter, CHEAPER, DUH!!!! The only way you might get me back to the overpriced notebooks is if they made them lighter, only SlIGHTLY bigger, and had a handle on them so I wouldn't have to put up with a big clumsy tote bag or carrying case. And I still refuse to pay the kind of prices that are out there for larger units. These netbooks are so handy sized, I can carry one in one hand and hardly notice the thing. Definitely fits in a small on-board tote bag with the other bare essentials for flying. I just can't say that even for the smallest notebook. And movies, who cares? Not me! I don't watch them on the move anyway! My attention span is good for UTUBE videos, and now some of the HULU tv shows are HD. 1200X600 is good enough for that. I don't even watch much TV or movies at home so DVD players are yesterday! All the netbooks I've been watching have 160Gb drives on them anyway, so we know where that is headed!

mstoumba
mstoumba

I stick with HP and Dell There are 20 company's that can service them close to us and maybe 1 that can do the off brands.

TNT
TNT

Acer is an inexpensive brand manufacturer, owning e-machines and Gateway as well. But they are also the 3rd or 4th (I can't remember for sure) largest computer manufacturer in the world. Do their computers sometimes have problems? Sure do. Is their repair department sometimes more of an excuse department? Absolutely. But the same could be said for HP (especially right after they bought Compaq) and Dell. I own an Acer netbook, take it everywhere, and have had zero problems with it. I bought an Acer laptop for my parents (only $300!) and again, no trouble whatsoever. I just bought another Acer laptop (again, for $300) for my best friends parents who are traveling with it for the holidays. So far the quality has held for all these devices. That said, I think there is no comparison for HP's business class products. They are built to take a lot more abuse and the customer service is pretty great. But an decent business laptop from HP is also $1200 - four times what I spent on the Acer. I could buy 4 Acers and throw one away every time it has a problem and would probably get a longer lifetime out of those four than I would out of the single HP. For the casual user Acer is a great brand.

Answerfactory
Answerfactory

I had a 15.4 " widescreen laptop last year and it was wayyyy to big. It was my first laptop and I went for size first. Since that didn't work out ( I hated lugging it around so I never used it ), I am getting a Netbook next. It has to be < $250, though.

The Admiral
The Admiral

Then why bother with a netbook when you have an iPhone?

Spiritusindomit
Spiritusindomit

Despite what wikipedia may say, a netbook by industry terms refers specifically to a unit that uses a specific type of mobile processor and is under a specific screen size. This is a compact notebook.

dmies
dmies

I have to give Acer credit for being responsive to the user. After the 3rd failure of the display in my daughter's laptop they had her send back the machine via overnight delivery, fixed it (we hope!), and sent it back, again via overnight delivery. She was without it for only 2 days and it seems to be working again. Acer paid all the shipping costs and gave her a direct dial contact number if there are any other problems. I think that's pretty good for customer support. BTW, they said the problem was a bad cable on the mother board which they replaced.

yattwood
yattwood

Well, when someone comes up with something that will let me run Oracle/SQL Server/DB2, plus Spotlight, plus SecureCRT that allows me to get to all my UNIX servers, plus Toad, plus Space Manager for Oracle, plus IPSWITCH WS_FTP, plus Citrix, plus VMWare that runs my Ubuntu...on a laptop weighing less than 15lbs, then I'll be very, very interested (I _still_ miss the SPARC RDI laptop with Solaris that I had when I worked in aerospace (waah) (just being a curmudgeon....)

g.dodd
g.dodd

I normally don't join in these discussions because this goes back to vi vs. emacs and Word Perfect vs. Wordstar.... but....... I know when I need a Desktop PC, and I know when I need a laptop, and guess what, I know when I need a netbook. Let's stop this contant tirade against netbooks, against Linux, against Micro$oft. Start comparing Apples to Apples instead of Apples to SUV's ;-) I want to see comparisons between similar products, fair comparisons with no (or little) bias. Then let me make my educated decision and I will take the responsibility for this decision. 'Cos that's what I'm paid to do @marcedhk - enjoyed the rant, know where your coming from as well

notinterestedanymore
notinterestedanymore

I've got to agree with marcedhk - Jason's anti netbook crusade is getting very tiresome. People buy what ever is the most suitable for their need. For me, a 9 inch netbook is ideal for taking to meetings because its size makes it unobtrusive.

kbryk90
kbryk90

"buyers are not the hard core always-multitasking-poweruser-techies that visit this site" If someone weren't a "hard core always-multitasking-poweruser-techies that visit this site" they wouldn't read this article...or visiting this site and neither should you. //Enraged rant beings Use some logic in your posts before you go and "rant" about an author. If you had any credibility it would be you instead of him writing articles. //Enraged rant ends The article was a quick read, nothing special, just updated users on the idea that there is something between a netbook and laptop that may suite the consumers needs. A little pricey for using "standard business applications".

jgtechie
jgtechie

Whether you choose a netbook or a laptop like the Acer it's entirely based on choice and need. I have had several netbooks and tried one of these Acers (a well known, nation wide retailers sells these for < $450) and chose to go back to a dual core laptop with an extended battery.

JCitizen
JCitizen

I understand why they do it, I just won't let them get away with it!

SmartAceW0LF
SmartAceW0LF

Acer has been primarily responsible for the drastic decrease in portable computers. This can not be denied. But that is about where their true merit ends. Deal personally with their Customer Service a time or two. Will take a mighty strong bit of forgiveness and complacency to willingly allow them to be the recipient of any of your money again. The greatest feeling you will have upon coming away from your CS experience with Acer is the confidence that your determination NOT to do business with them any further is a mutual feeling with them. They simply do not care. Send a computer in with a known issue 2, 3 or even 4 times for the same issue and wait up to a month for it to come back and then the warranty runs out on it. Partner you are S.O.L.! Would much rather reap the benifits of their prices elsewhere within the market. So thank you Acer for your rock bottom prices and what it has done for the market! And thank you also for the remarkable consistency you have exhibited in your deplorable customer service! Makes my decisions simple!

SmartAceW0LF
SmartAceW0LF

I am impressed! Yours is the very first I have ever heard of such a response from Acer! Seriously now, I am impressed!

adeger
adeger

Yeah, my netbook isn't natively powerful. But as soon as I'm in Wifi range it's about as powerful as the machine I remote into to do the heavy lifting. Probably wouldn't work for editing graphics but, for me, the combo just about everything else I need. Also, for me a superior and less constrained choice than a Kindle or Sony Reader for reading PDFs.

bobjorg
bobjorg

At the rate of progress in the industry it won't be long - IF THRE IS A MARKET FOR IT. Today's iron was not even thought of back when I was programming the 650, 1401, 360, etc. We couldn't have even dreamt of today's kind of power!

marcedhk
marcedhk

1. Jason Hiner is someone who I have a very high degree of regard for. I read his articles and watch his videos regularly, and appreciate his insights and opinions. I labelled my rant as such in order to make it clear to readers that it was just that, so it wouldn't be seen as an actual criticism of Jason. Just because I disagree strongly with one of his opinions does not in any way mean that I consider him unqualified, not credible, or believe that I should be elevated to his status. I'm sorry that you didn't pick up on this. 2. If you read my post properly, you will see that I did exactly what you are suggesting. I first put my logical points across, and only after that did I go into my rant, which although it was certainly a rant,it nevertheless still employed logic. ;) 3. I don't need to have credibility. I simply need to make logical points, as these carry their own credibility. 4. While you see this article as just a quick read, I see it as another salvo in Jason's ongoing crusade against Netbooks. Because Jason is someone who has a great deal of credibility and his opinion carries significant weight, plebs like me see a need to voice alternative opinions so that readers come away with a balanced view of the issue. 5. There are 2 points I was attempting to make regarding the powerusers. The first is simply that hard core users (and I actually am one of those for whom a Netbook would not satisfy my normal daily requirements), are very much the minority of the market. There is a very large number of consumers for whom a Netbook is just what they need. In addition, there are also a significant number of powerusers who don't need full power all the time. There sometimes are times/trips/presentations where when you consider the hassles involved with traveling, even powerusers might be better served by a Netbook. Jason's article is saying don't get a Netbook, this Acer Timeline is what you need. I'm saying no, there are times when the Timeline is still too large, too expensive, and a bit of overkill. A Netbook would be the better tool for the job in that circumstance.