iPad

Apple iPad: Is there an ROI for business?

The Apple iPad has officially arrived, accompanied by an overload of hype. We suggest it may actually make more sense for businesses than consumers.

Podcast

The Apple iPad has officially arrived, accompanied by an overload of hype. We suggest it may actually make more sense for businesses than consumers.

The Big Question is a joint production from ZDNet and TechRepublic that I co-host with ZDNet Editor in Chief Larry Dignan.

You can play this 20-minute episode from the Flash-based player at the top of the page, read the full transcript below, or:

If you enjoy this podcast, please go to to our iTunes page to rate it and leave a short review.

Stories discussed in this episode:

Full transcript

Jason Hiner

Welcome to The Big Question podcast, episode number 26 for April 7, 2010. I'm Jason Hiner.

Larry Dignan

And I'm Larry Dignan.

Jason Hiner

And this is a joint ZDNet and TechRepublic podcast where we pick one of the hottest issues in the tech world and attack it head-on. This week's big question is "Apple iPad: is there an ROI for business?"

This episode is sponsored by TechRepublic's Guide to IT Policies and Procedures, which has over 100 customizable templates that IT leaders can use to really save some serious time and money. You can purchase a copy today and download it right away at policies.techrepublic.com.

So, Larry, the Apple iPad has finally been released, accompanied by an obscene amount of hype. We have both written about it. And now that it's here, the conversation starts to get a lot more real. And of course, we want to talk about it from the business perspective and look at whether there really is a case to be made, an ROI case, return on investment, for the iPad.

Do you want to start this off by telling us why businesses would even be interested in considering the iPad?

Larry Dignan

Well, I think for some fields, a device like the iPad will make a lot of sense. Real estate, you can find some implications. Retail, perhaps. There are a few verticals where the iPad may make sense; items where you're in the field. Anywhere where you see folks running around with little handhelds.

Jason Hiner

Yeah, where you're not at a desk.

Larry Dignan

Right. For people in the field, it may make sense. Because it would be easier to pop up an iPad than it would be to fire up a laptop. So I think that's one avenue to be explored at least. And the iPhone does have some - you can get Oracle apps and salesforce.com apps. So there is a business ecosystem for the apps that would work on the iPad. I think that's a baseline place to look.

Jason Hiner

Okay.

Larry Dignan

I think it would probably be more high-touch people in the field sort of focuses.

I almost - I mean I haven't really thought this through per se. But as a consumer, you're looking at it, and you're like, "Okay, it's one more device to carry." And you're going back and forth. Is this a laptop replacement? It's kind of expensive. The sell process for a consumer is different.

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

I think a consumer is going to have to go into Best Buy three or four times, pass that thing, play with it a little bit and maybe they take the plunge and buy it, maybe the fourth trip. Right?

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

So aside from the people that bought it first on the weekend or whatever. But that's Apple's core crowd.

So then that gets you to, what other folks can use it? And I almost think you can - businesses want to think about the iPad. I almost think you can probably make more of a case for business than you could necessarily for a consumer.

Jason Hiner

Interesting. Okay.

Larry Dignan

Because if you have somebody in the field and you just need to access a CRM app or salesforce.com or whatever your use case is, it's all about just sucking down data and getting information out to people.

Jason Hiner

Yeah, one-app or two-app jobs.

Larry Dignan

And that's what it does well, right?

Jason Hiner

Yeah, that's true. Because of its limitation, doesn't do multi-tasking. There are jobs out there or at least tasks that are relegated to certain positions where they only use two to three apps all day. And that's the stuff you're getting at.

Larry Dignan

Yeah, I mean I almost - conceptually, I almost get it more as a business device than I necessarily do as a consumer device. And - I don't know, you're going to need enterprises to think about how this would work and IT's going to do what IT does, which is sort of close it out at first, [and] figure out how it goes with their network. It'll be like when folks brought in their iPhones to work, right? What happens when they bring in their iPad?

Jason Hiner

Yeah, similar stuff.

Larry Dignan

Right. The problem with the iPad is, there's no - there's no handy way to connect it to the PC or the corporate network.

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

Right? Because -

Jason Hiner

There's WiFi. It's a WiFi-only device. Or 3G, once the 3G version comes out later in April.

Larry Dignan

Yeah, so you kind of wonder about that long-term as far as it impacts the business. But I can picture these things in the field.

Jason Hiner

Interesting. So what do you think about some of the verticals where, to a degree, tablets have already been accepted? Medical, mobile point-of-sale, I think [that] is where you've seen line-breaking and things like that, at places like theme parks and those kinds of places. Kiosks - by kiosks, I mean the places where somebody has like a [sales] stand. Some of these you're seeing with handhelds now, Windows Mobile devices or even iPod Touches with an antenna, WiFi in it with a little card swipe in it, those type of things.

Do you think that this device - let's talk about healthcare first. Because I've heard rumors - maybe you have too - about doctors getting on board with the iPhone in some cases. I've not seen one single [doctor] anywhere, but I've read a few stories that doctors and medical professionals are starting to get on board with the iPhone. Does the iPad make more sense? That group has also been one of the few that has taken on Tablet PCs, which nobody [else] wanted. What do you think there?

Larry Dignan

Ah, could be. I mean the one thing to remember about doctors is they also tend to love technology.

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

Every time I see my doctor, it turns into, "Oh, what about this technology" or whatever. It's almost to the point where you don't really mention where you work or what you cover. Because who wants to go into geekdom when you're at the doctor.

So it doesn't surprise me that iPhones would be at a doctor's office. They're probably all over the place, just sort of that consumerization thing where the consumers are doctors and they bring those puppies in. I can see the iPad being used for educational purposes. There's multiple purposes in the healthcare industry. And like you said, if you want to find a tablet in the wild, that's kind of where you go.

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

That's probably the only place I can think of where you go. Because you just don't see tablets out there too often.

Jason Hiner

They've really been rejected by most industries and by businesses in general, especially pen computing. The difference is, this is kind of touch computing. Microsoft's Tablet PC was using the stylus and writing on the screen. But unfortunately, the handwriting recognition was never very good. People just didn't use them. They didn't feel real great about using them.

There is some evidence that with the iPhone and iPad Touch, that people are more comfortable with this kind of interface. So one of the questions is, can touch tablets succeed where the pen computing tablets failed?

Larry Dignan

Well, I definitely see touch tablets doing much better than pen. The pen just took too much to get used to.

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

There's too much of a learning curve. There was no pre-work involved.

Jason Hiner

It was too unnatural, too, wasn't it? It didn't - it wasn't just like writing on a pen and a piece of paper.

Larry Dignan

Right, it wasn't natural. That - the touch interface, I mean anybody with a smartphone kind of knows it by now, right?

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

No matter you have a BlackBerry Storm, an iPhone, an Android device -

Jason Hiner

Palm Pre.

Larry Dignan

You kind of know how to point and move things around. So in that regard, the learning curve isn't nearly as steep as it would be for pen sort of stuff.

Jason Hiner

Yeah. That may be the biggest thing it has going for it in business. In that - because businesses are going to look at this, especially IT departments, from really a cold, hard case. And they're going to look for what kind of ROI - what's the ROI I come up with. Like okay, look - this thing, I'm only going to typically use about three apps. I can teach anybody, I don't have to go through a big training course to teach them anything. I can give them one of these. I can tell them touch that one, go in here and do it. And I can cut training time by half a day. And if I have 10,000 new employees a year or something, then they're going to say, okay, that adds up to $1.3 million or whatever it is.

I think that could be one of the ways that businesses get on board with touch computing. And it may not just be the iPad, we are going to see some other lookalikes. We are already seeing the one from HP. Today Nokia mentioned that they're going to be coming out with these. So for touch tablets, the iPad is kind of the beginning of touch tablets, don't you think?

Larry Dignan

Yeah, I could see that for sure. I just think it's going to be a question of time, right? And all these tablets are going to come out and they all have different operating systems. And you sort of have this operating system conundrum, like can Windows 7 scale down to be on the tablet, can Android and the iPhone operating system beef up to work - sort of become a laptop replacement. Businesses will be watching that very closely, especially since at some point, these things might connect to your corporate network. So, you know, does HP and Microsoft bring certain core competencies to the table that would matter to an enterprise more?

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

I don't know, you would think, right?

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

But who knows.

Jason Hiner

Certainly, there is some behind the scenes stuff that favors them, right? They're used to selling through the channel, through IT consultants and integrators; that could help. You know HP and Microsoft, they're also used to selling in bulk and working out big contracts. These are things that Apple's not - has historically just not been real great at. So as good as the product is and as great as they are at selling to consumers, they're almost that bad at selling to businesses and large organizations. Do you agree?

Larry Dignan

Yeah. Well, yeah, for the most part. You know, it all depends on how much you believe in that consumerization thing. That the workers are going to bring the super device in and you're going to have to - the corporation's going to have to deal with it. I mean, I know one professor at one school where she brought in her iPhone, and they said well, tough, here's your BlackBerry. So yeah, it remains to be seen how that battle plays out.

Jason Hiner

Yeah. And I believe in it, I think it's just a little longer slog than they'd like to think in Silicon Valley. I mean, I think it's a -

Larry Dignan

Well, it's like everything.

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

It's always - I mean, if you watch the Jetsons, you're stunned at how undeveloped we are, right? We're supposed to be in floating cars and we're supposed to have robots doing things for us and aside from the iRobot, you get the thing to vacuum for you but that's -

Jason Hiner

The little Roomba, that's about as much of a robot as we've got, right?

Larry Dignan

Yeah, exactly. So all these things are going to take longer. And I think that's - that might be the lesson for the tablet adoption. I mean, I think all the people with ADD are going to look at this - that first day sales and you know - because my guess is it's probably going to underwhelm some people right out the gate.

Jason Hiner

Interesting.

Larry Dignan

But I think the iPad is a different sort of device. There's a learning curve. And I think HP is going to see that with its slate. And I mean businesses might look at it today. But realistically, they're not going to have to revisit it till at least a year, if not more.

Jason Hiner

Interesting. I think - I'm not sure if people - I'm holding [an iPad] right now, we've got one in here at TechRepublic, we cracked it apart yesterday and we were going to be posting some photos and an evaluation of the innards. But I think it's actually a pretty shiny object when you first have it. It feels pretty good. I was surprised at how fast it is. And the touch interface is far more precise than the iPhone and some of the Android devices I've used.

Larry Dignan

Yeah.

Jason Hiner

Even the Palm Pre. So that kind of bodes well for it. I think it's a pretty good first impression with it, at least mine was. It's pretty easy to use. I just wonder, over time from the consumer side, if people will stick with it or if you're used to using a laptop or used to using a smartphone, the only thing that those folks, business travellers, if we talk about that market, that's kind of what I'm getting at. I think some of those folks are the ones who could influence this.

Business travelers I think are going to really like this. It's great for [them]. Not only can you read books, but you can watch movies, listen to your audio books, that kind of thing. And hotel entertainment and airplane entertainment being lacking as it is, and even for [light] productivity. This thing has a chance to win over some of those folks.

But those - some of those are executives and salespeople who a lot of times they buy their own stuff anyway and they either just expense it or write it off on their taxes. I think this has a chance with those folks. Because they also like their shiny objects, kind if like doctors, like you said. But not only that, it's pretty usable. I just don't think it's as much of a replacement for your laptop, your daily kind of computing tasks as Apple would like you to think. I think for light computing, some email, send a few messages, and maybe do a little bit of IM on the fly, that stuff is going to be fine. But when you really have to get down to work, you're still not going to use this thing. And then, if you have to do some work on a trip of if you're a business person - you're still stuck with three devices, a smartphone, a tablet and a laptop.

And I think that's what you are getting at is, that's where this thing may be is in a little bit of trouble. Until it can become more of a laptop replacement, its audience is pretty limited.

Larry Dignan

Yeah, I'm not bringing three devices, is what it comes down to, right? I mean the Kindle, you can kind of justify because you're carrying something instead of a paper book. And I guess you could kind of do that with the iPad too. But it is bigger. And I don't know...

Jason Hiner

It is. And heavier too, it's heavier, definitely.

Larry Dignan

Yeah, it's bigger, it's heavier. I need something to consolidate devices. And this isn't it.

Jason Hiner

Yeah, it's another - it's an add-on. So that's going to be something interesting to watch and we will certainly -

Larry Dignan

Now, that said, if it goes to 300 bucks, I'm in. Right? So yeah, the price too. I mean the price point right now matter a lot.

Jason Hiner

Yes. That's funny.

Larry Dignan

Because at that $500 range, which is the least equipped one, you look at it, and it doesn't compete with just devices, it competes with everything, right? 500 bucks. Well that could be used to pay down your mortgage.

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

You know, it can knock down your credit card bill. It can fund your college plan, right? I mean 500 bucks is real money.

Jason Hiner

There's a lot you can do with 500 bucks, that's true.

Larry Dignan

And then once you get up for the 699 one, then you're like, well, why don't I just buy a MacBook?

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

So I mean it's tough.

Jason Hiner

Or like that little - what was that one we were talking about? The Dell Vostro V13 or something? That one is like six or seven hundred bucks.

Larry Dignan

Yeah, exactly. It's kind of the same price.

Jason Hiner

Yeah.

Larry Dignan

So, those are real issues.

Jason Hiner

It's really - to me it's a netbook plus an e-reader. I never was really into netbooks, I had no use case for those. And this one is - that's where this one is kind of in muddy water for me a little bit too. But it succeeds where the netbook fails in that it's far more usable. Like, I could actually do a lot more stuff on this. Watching video is far better. Reading is much better than on a netbook. Even the Kindle, I wasn't crazy about the reading experience on the Kindle. The reading experience is much better [on the iPad].

So as a media consumption device and a light computing device, which is kind of the Kindle plus a netbook, I think it beats both of them. And it does do a little consolidation. But the thing is, I don't know that many people that were going to have both a netbook and a Kindle. So that's sort of the - there's where the consumer conundrum kind of comes in.

Larry Dignan

Yeah, exactly. I mean I just think it's going to take time.

Jason Hiner

Yeah. Fun stuff, though. It could be - the touch stuff is here to stay, I do think. And I think this is going to have implications for laptops and potentially smartphones - something we will keep watching. We also have a lot of coverage on this on ZDNet and TechRepublic. You can find links to those articles in the show notes, I wrote my first impressions, which is called iPad for business: Three reasons to love it and three reasons to ignore it. You will find that linked in the show notes as well.

And as always, ZDNet is your source for latest news and perspectives in business tech. TechRepublic is a source for IT leaders to engage in peer-to-peer conversations and get some tips and best practices. And also, you can find Larry and I online. So Larry, where do people find you?

Larry Dignan

[Between the Lines] btl.zdnet.com and on Twitter I'm ldignan.

Jason Hiner

Alright, so you can find my blog, Tech Sanity Check, at sanity.techrepublic.com; and you can find me on Twitter at twitter.com/jasonhiner.

Thanks for listening. We'll see you next time.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

61 comments
cappiels
cappiels

I think we'll have to revisit this conversation after 10am PST today when they discuss the iPhone 4 OS release. Regardless, I think this podcast is kinda missing the point.. the iPad does not seem (to me) to be targeted to geeks. It's more for my sister, who does not have a laptop and really doesn't want to cart around a MacBook. There are still plenty of people out there that do not own laptops or smartphones-- yet who are aware of how cool an iPhone is. I think THAT is the target market.

TelesisIT
TelesisIT

Big time miss for business and education. Apple had one of the best handwriting recognition programs of its time on the Newton. Why they don?t add a stylist to this for an input. If I am in a meeting or a class, I don?t want to type or voice notes to any device, I want to write. I have two tablet PC and if the iPad had a stylist, it would replace them. Even if it did not recognize the handwriting, It would eliminate paper and that would be one less thing I would have to carry. Instant on, take a note, off again. Priceless. Adding just that one item to this would make it business travelers laptop replacement.

travis.duffy
travis.duffy

Didn't think so, therefore they will not be allowed here.

Davidgriff
Davidgriff

Are you people ASLEEP ? As someone with real experience in trying to place IT solutions in the hands of ordinary people, this thing is truly magical. One app at a time - fantastic, that's all normal people want. Being able to prompt input in a controlled way? Incredible. Being able to put a truly up-to-the-minute catalog in the hands of every salesman and process his order without him having to fight Windows in front of a customer - priceless! I have just listened to you two desperately trying not to like this product - just spend a day in the real world and you'll be singing a different tune.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Apple acknowledged on its support page that "under certain conditions, iPad may not automatically rejoin a known wi-fi network". Real Handy...

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

With all the reported problems with the WiFi connectivity, an already difficult case for bringing one in just became impossible.

travis.duffy
travis.duffy

In the break room as a toy. Everything else will be left to devices with more function.

Fregeus
Fregeus

from my client's network, but from the title of the blog, I will say this; yes. For me, I will buy the iPad as soon as its available in Canada so I can put all those heavy IT books I have on it and I can carry them around without breaking my already weak back. Its not a PC for me, its a reader with great features added. I don't buy it as a netbook competitor. Although from what I see people use netbook for, it could be. My ex has a netbook and uses it only to download music and video, surf and email. The iPad can do all that. TCB

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

The podcast is Flash based; can it be viewed on a iPad? Call me when those transcripts are released, or just remove the comment about them coming. It's reaching 'vaporware' status.

r.doub
r.doub

when used as a consumer device...I pay $50 per month for broadband at home (and I can hook up as many devices as I want). I pay $30 per month for data access on my iPhone. I'm supposed to pay another $30 per month for data on the iPad? WiFi alone is too limiting.

tyjustice
tyjustice

It's made by pogo and people are using them to write and draw on the iPhones and iPads. Typing on the iPad is pretty easy surprisingly enough... I've been using mine to take notes in meetings and I was a bit shocked at how fast it became second nature to type on a screen.

tyjustice
tyjustice

I think that a lot of you just want to hate it. I guess time will prove you wrong. As someone that has worked in IT and education for years as well as a few other industries I see a lot of uses for this device in both business and education. Education: We deployed HP tablets to our math teachers with Win 7. What a clunky touch interface. It was overly complicated for the teachers and what they needed. The iPad is less expensive and would do everything they needed that HP tablet to do as far as marking up student work and drawing equations on the screen. I spent months on the project and less than one week on the iPad and I have duplicated it all and I can tell you... they would learn this a lot faster than the crappy HP. Business: As far as the catalog is concerned I completely disagree with you. We have a web based catalog with our ordering system built in... many companies have this (it's called an online store). The potential for even a small to medium sized business to develop an application to run their business is there as well. My last company was developing iPhone based Math teaching tools to sell to schools. I have been using mine in meetings in place of my paper notebook and I use a free program that syncs all my notes to my laptop, desktop and a web app. It's replaced my Kindle, my PSP, my paper notepad and my netbook so for personal use it's combined a lot of my gadgets and given me the extra functionality so I can actually use it at work; unlike my Kindle, PSP and netbook.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"One app at a time - fantastic, ... Being able to put a truly up-to-the-minute catalog in the hands of every salesman and process his order..." Open an app to view the catalog. Close it. Open another to enter the order. Close it. Open the first app again when the customer asks about something else. Lather, rinse, repeat. Edited - incorrect content removed.

Slayer_
Slayer_

I am not sure what its called, co-worker has it. It functions by moving shutters to white or black. No back light. It uses a small rechargable battery. Has no on/off switch. Two buttons to flip pages. And only uses power when you turn the page. He says he has read 4 books on it in the last year and has yet to have to recharge it. And it's just a thin pad about the thickness of a normal hand held calculator.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

that can also check email, play video, surf Web pages, and do a little bit of light computing.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

How are you going to convert all that dead tree content you're carrying to digital?

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

I just added the transcript to this one. All future episodes should now include the transcripts as well.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

called iTunes. It works on the iPad, and a approximately a billion other computers. :-) Plus, there's the raw MP3.

lazerousz
lazerousz

The one trick to get this device to really fit businesses is connecting to to VOIP through Wifi with a bluetooth headset, since the controls are on the headset then this could in fact work as a smart-phone replacement. Obviously the battery life would be a concern but that is what I see is the way to slow down the problem of carrying too many devices.

tyjustice
tyjustice

I think that a lot of you just want to hate it. I guess time will prove you wrong. As someone that has worked in IT and education for years as well as a few other industries I see a lot of uses for this device in both business and education. Education: We deployed HP tablets to our math teachers with Win 7. What a clunky touch interface. It was overly complicated for the teachers and what they needed. The iPad is less expensive and would do everything they needed that HP tablet to do as far as marking up student work and drawing equations on the screen. I spent months on the project and less than one week on the iPad and I have duplicated it all and I can tell you... they would learn this a lot faster than the crappy HP. Business: As far as the catalog is concerned I completely disagree with you. We have a web based catalog with our ordering system built in... many companies have this (it's called an online store). The potential for even a small to medium sized business to develop an application to run their business is there as well. My last company was developing iPhone based Math teaching tools to sell to schools. I have been using mine in meetings in place of my paper notebook and I use a free program that syncs all my notes to my laptop, desktop and a web app. It's replaced my Kindle, my PSP, my paper notepad and my netbook so for personal use it's combined a lot of my gadgets and given me the extra functionality so I can actually use it at work; unlike my Kindle, PSP and netbook.

vince
vince

Once again, the IT industry is attempting to find a use for a product, rather than finding a product to fill an actual need. I can't see how this device would provide any ROI unless it directly replaces notebooks during a lifecycle refresh.

asia.williams
asia.williams

Owning an iPod Touch,I find (based off reading reviews and watching demos)that the iPad offers nothing more but a bigger screen, larger qwerty, mp4 and nothing more! Come on!!!! Foremost, have you ever tried to view something over the web that requires Flash on one of these things? Were you successful? I bet the answer is NO. Also, the platform is to rigid in relation to the web. Why can't you use a memory card? Why do I have to pay for all the apps if Droid has similar apps and they're mostly free. I am totally frustrated with Apples "nickle and dime you" tactics. When spending this amount of money one expects an upgraded level of performance and accommodation. Yes, there are free apps, but the most useful ones are for a price. Apple has wireless functionality, but where is the ability to wirelessly exchange data? I mean they have the "bump" application, but even that has its limitations. All I am saying is that Apple needs to step their game up!!! This device should not require only a cord as a listening option. Hell, personally, it should have an iPhone integrated into it for this price. I would like to see wireless transmission of data, decrease of wire usage and more interfacing with the Cloud. Also, they need an application that allows viewing of Flash content. I'm sorry, NO KUDOS FROM ME!

tracy.walters
tracy.walters

Maybe as time goes on someone comes up with a killer app that makes the iPad useful in the business world, but currently it doesn't fit anything. Most of us have a laptop/desktop for serious work and carry a smartphone for email and instant communication...sometimes small apps. If the iPad had come with a projector built in it may have made a niche as a conference room/seminar/sales tool which would be lighter to carry around than a laptop. Currently, I just don't see where it fits, and it's another piece of difficult to integrate hardware into the business network.

SmartAceW0LF
SmartAceW0LF

I am considering buying one if for no other reason than to have something to read while I set atop my throne!

mafergus
mafergus

It makes it a perfect tool for enterprises. If they can lower the pricepoint and provide an enterprise level deployment/configuration tool it would make a nice step below traditional notebooks. I can see it being used for tradional sales groups.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

How can you tell where your fingers are without looking? What kind of feedback do you receive to be sure your fingers are still positioned on the keys?

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

that will run in the background while you use other apps. Yahoo IM is one of the other ones.

SgtPappy
SgtPappy

You hit the nail on the head and counter sunk it a quarter inch into the board.

bsmi021
bsmi021

It is nice to see someone not see the world thur apple colored glasses!

jfuller05
jfuller05

if you're primary function will be reading, I would go with this device.

mafergus
mafergus

Why doesn't Apple come out with an enterprise OS?

Fregeus
Fregeus

..I need to buy the digital version of the books. Which means spending more money to buy something I already have. But I have to leave the books at home because I cannot carry them, so in a sense, its like I don't have them. Anyways, for me, I feel its worth it. TCB

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

And the peasants feasted, and drank of ale and mead, and slaughtered calves and goats, and there was much dancing and revelry and debauching; and in the short term were hangovers; and in the long term, labor pains.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

help a person see you webpage with the video or audio playing on an iPad? They have to open another app and then find it. Too late they left...

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

So what's all the flap about iPads and iPhones not displaying Flash? Are these comments confined to their browser apps only? I rarely deal with digitally formatted content outside a couple of weekly .MP3 downloads from radio shows. (And I often don't get to them before they're outdated.) I thought iTunes was Apple's online distribution system. It's also an app? Are there two different products with the same name, the store and the app?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Has anyone else seen numbers regarding how many people DON'T use the smart phones to make phone calls, who communicate far more over IM than voice? They're not going to care about the lack of voice communications. Eventually business communications may shift away from voice as those more accustomed to IM and other non-voice messaging become a majority of the workforce. I don't see that happening this decade. As I've repeatedly said, I've concluded this device is aimed at consumers, not business.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"We have a web based catalog with our ordering system built in... many companies have this (it's called an online store)." The iPad doesn't bring anything new to this. It's a web site your customers could access from any platform with a browser, including existing desktops, laptops, netbooks, and tablets. This device is for those who live in the cloud. I submit the majority of business users don't.

asia.williams
asia.williams

Where is the multitasking option??? I'm confused. High Price, attractive, futuristic appearance, functionality...too limited.

vince
vince

Agree completely

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

spend an extra $30 at Lowe's and get the cushioned seat.

bsmi021
bsmi021

All apple products are much more than other products, so here in lies the rub there is still not a roi when you have to spend more for the same thing.

tyjustice
tyjustice

Well if you look at the screen then you're looking at the keyboard on the iPad while typing... It's not a laptop and I don't think it's a replacement for one. I can type without looking at my keyboard. Even on the iPad I took notes while looking up and with very few errors after getting a feel of the keys locations. The size is nearly that of my keyboard on my Dell laptop so it really didn't take much to get it down.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Sorry, never used an iPhone. I've handled a BB Storm a couple of times, enough to dislike it. I'm aware the iPhone uses a different technology. I realize the majority of people aren't touch typists, and you don't say if you are or not, but I don't look at my fingers or the keys when I type. I look at the screen to see what I'm typing, or at the paper I'm entering from.

tyjustice
tyjustice

You sort of hover above it... Just like an iPhone if you push the wrong key just keep your finger down and move it to the right key. It's probably similar to typing on the projected keyboard you can buy for some smart phones. I adjusted to it quickly and didn't find it difficult and I thought I would... I really never thought I would be able to take notes on it.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I've edited my previous post to remove the inaccuracies.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

1) Maybe Apple isn't aiming this device at the enterprise, so an enterprise OS wouldn't be appropriate. I've read much debate about who the target market is; most seem to think it's aimed more at entertainment consumers and a sliver of road warriors than the majority of business users. 2) Modifying the iPhone OS allows immediate access to all those relatively cheap iPhone apps. Apps for OS X usually cost more and aren't as well suited to the iPad format. 3) It may have been more difficult to add the necessary 'touch' interface capabilities to OS X than to modify the iPhone's OS to a larger format. 4) To you and I, an OS is an OS, a tool to support the applications. Right or wrong, some consumers perceive a touch interface as more 'fun' than a conventional keyboard-and-mouse based one. There's a marketing advantage to 'fun'; see Apple's successful but grossly inaccurate 'I'm a Mac / I'm a PC' campaign. None of which explains why they left out the telephone and camera capabilities. We know the OS will support them; it already does on the iPhone. The darn thing already has Bluetooth and speakers; it could have been built to require the use of a headset instead of an on-board mike.

mafergus
mafergus

Or any enterprised based OS for the IPAD as an option.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Is your question why they didn't apply it to this piece of hardware?

Slayer_
Slayer_

Finally, now I can actually know what these things are about.

Slayer_
Slayer_

I remember back in the HTML4 days you could just tell it to embed a default player and tell it to play a music file located on the server. Is this not a possibility anymore?

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

or any other swf on this site. You should make an ipad version of the site.

SgtPappy
SgtPappy

while you were listening to it?

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Actually, it's a couple apps - the iTunes store and the media player are separate on the iPhone and iPad (unlike on PC and Mac, where the two are combined). By the way, I also just pulled up the post on an iPad and clicked the MP3 link and it played right away.

Fregeus
Fregeus

..that the iTunes app is an app to manage your MP3 and video files from which you can connect to the iStore to buy tunes and vids. I don't know about the Flash thing other than what I read here and other IT sites. TCB

tyjustice
tyjustice

Actually it DOES bring something new to this... and that is a touch interface that works; unlike the Windows 7 touch interface. I have been using and deploying touch interface products for years and trust me... it's the best one thus far. My point was that you could have an app that did the ordering, the catalog, etc.. all in one. Whether that is app made by your company or a web app. As for the cloud... I am not sure where you work or what industry you are in but cloud computing is one of the top growing trends in IT. Lots of businesses live in the cloud and lots more are looking at the cloud to host their applications, data and websites.

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