Apple

Business users: Everything you need to know about the Apple iPad

The Apple iPad has been one of the most popular topics on TechRepublic in 2010. Here's a roundup of the articles we've done to help IT and businesses better understand its impact.

Whether you're a fan of the Apple iPad or not, there's no denying that it has been one of the top technology stories of 2010. Here in Tech Sanity Check, I've done a series of articles throughout the year to help IT professionals and businesses sort out the iPad's impact on the enterprise.

Taken together, the seven articles listed below provide a comprehensive look at the iPad, its strengths and weaknesses, and its potential as a business tool.

1. Apple iPad: The business review

If you're interested in the Apple iPad, you've probably read the initial reviews. Here is TechRepublic's real world review, from a business perspective.

2. Apple iPad: Is there an ROI for business?

The arrival of the Apple iPad was accompanied by a truckload of hype. In this podcast, we suggest it may actually make more sense for businesses than consumers.

3. Apple iPad: The five biggest annoyances

There's plenty to like about the Apple iPad, but there are also serious annoyances that hinder the overall product experience. Here are my top five.

4. Apple iPad for business: Three reasons to love it, three reasons to ignore it

Here are my first impressions of the iPad as a business device. See the top reasons why business should pay attention, as well as the reasons why it's safe to ignore.

5. CIOs say iPad and other slates have a place in business

TechRepublic's CIO Jury sees a place for the Apple iPad and other slate PCs in business. See how they voted and why.

6. Five business scenarios for the iPad and other tablets

Tablet computers have mostly been limited to niche verticals like health care. A new generation of tablets such as the Apple iPad could change that. Learn how.

7. Apple iPad: How will it impact business users?

Lots of people are talking about Apple's new iPad device, but this podcast from TechRepublic and ZDNet analyzes it from the perspective of its impact on business users.

More from TechRepublic

Here is a selection of other useful articles on the iPad from TechRepublic authors:

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About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the book, Follow the Geeks.

31 comments
BlueCollarCritic
BlueCollarCritic

"That's all I'm asking for, the acknowledgment that this issue isn't limited to Apple. ~Palmetto" Do you even read the posts you reply to? I've already stated, and before you raised this question, that I am not singling out APPLE because no one else but them participates in this kind of offshore slaving. "NAFTA has nothing to do with China. The 'NA' stands for 'North America' and is an agreement between the US, Canada, and Mexico. Further, raising the issue of trade agreements weaken your original position. Are you really concerned with the conditions of Chinese employees or just using your moral outrage as cover for your dislike of US trade policies? If there was no danger of US employment conditions deteriorating, would you still be as upset over factory conditions in China? You dilute your message by encompassing too many issues. ~Palmetto" I know what NAFTA stands for but unlike you, made clear by your own statement, I woke up and realized the big lie of NAFTA and one day you will too although it may be too late when you do. And if you really believe there is no connection between CHINA and NAFTA then any more explanation with you is pointless as you?ve committed to the fantasy world placed over us through our various media and news outlets. You should try watching news from media outlets outside of our country once in a while. You?d be surprised as to how much goes on here that we never hear about or that gets little to no press here but is page 1 news in other countries. If NAFTA had not off shored US manufacturing jobs to Mexico and then to China Yes I would still be unhappy with APPLE or any other companies use of slave labor in CHINA. The difference is that far fewer occurrences of it would be happen if NAFTA (nor anything like it) had been passed b/c then these jobs would have been kept here where slave labor is illegal. Notice how I did not say that it does not happen here but that it is illegal. I did this to save you the trouble of throwing back at me how slave labor still goes on here even though its illegal. And yes I did presume you would do that. Saved you again from throwing that back at me, about presuming what you?d say in your reply. Raising all of this also does NOT weaken anything and I feel sorry for you that you can't see this for yourself. BTW ? Notice how I still have not resorted to the lowest form of debate, name calling. How about you give it a try.

BlueCollarCritic
BlueCollarCritic

In case you aren't familiar with APPLE's darker side, be sure to check out the various news stories done on it's Chinese prodcution partner, Foxconn. This place is so bad that it's had to put up nets around the place4 to catch would be suicides. So far 111 Foxconn employees have comitted sucicde because the workplace is so bad. So when gauging the cost of the iPad or any other APPLE product be sure to add to it 11 Human lives which frankly are priceless and can not therefore be asisgned a currency value. Oh and BTW, as far as the environment goes, APPLES Chinese production facilities also have a bnad hostopry of toxic chemical relase and control so don't think your helping the enviornment by by an iPAD. You can read about FoXconn at the UK Newspaper wensite below: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/concern-over-human-cost-overshadows-ipad-launch-1983888.html

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Does this make Apple any different from the other big brands? All of them buy their components from overseas, sometimes from manufacturers with operating practices that don't conform to the US norm. That doesn't excuse Apple from doing so, but it's not a reason to single them out from the herd.

BlueCollarCritic
BlueCollarCritic

Are you serious? So because other corporations engage in this as well no one is allowed to point out Apple does unless we explicitly specify every corporation that does this as well even when its in reposne to a Story that is baout APPLE only? You must be one of those APPLE or DIE folks who can't let any level of criticism be aimed at our lord and savoir Steve Jobs.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"The big difference between DELL and APPLE is that APPLE projects its self as being this cool, Earth Friendly company that appeals to the yuppies and others like them." So it would be okay if Apple said, "Hey, we buy components from companies who treat their workers like dirt"? If their image was more like Dell's, then this wouldn't be an issue for you? As to my use of derogatory slang terms or name calling, I don't have to look far. From your first post on this same discussion: "You must be one of those APPLE or DIE folks who can't let any level of criticism be aimed at our lord and savoir Steve Jobs." And you still haven't addressed how this information should affect my buying purchases. If all the vendors get their components from the same sweatshops, where would you have me get computers? Should I get a soldering iron and make my own PCBs?

BlueCollarCritic
BlueCollarCritic

Now that you're use derogative slang terms the debate is no more as you've now dropped it to a level below debate. But to leave you with one final thought and to answer your questions. Yes I did make that Dell post and YES it was before I had read about the slave practices that go on in CHINA by Apple. I have not yet seen anything about DELL doing this but I imagine they do. The big difference between DELL and APPLE is that APPLE projects its self as being this cool, Earth Friendly company that appeals to the yuppies and others like them. I have purchased APPLE products in the past but will no more, at least not until they actually DO (not just say they have done) something about changing the way their manufacturers do things with regards to the factory slaves. It would behoove you to be a little sympathetic to these people because chances are good you and I are not too many years from falling into a similar set of circumstances if we don?t stop our corrupt and corporate run government from flushing us down the toilet. Notice how I addressed your question without having to resort to the lowest form of debate, name calling. Now go spend an hour or 2 going thru every post I;ve ever made so you can find some slang word I?ve used so you can throw it back at me in response; go ahead, I?ll wait.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I hereby officially declare I don't condone this behavior by any company; be it Apple, another computer vendor, or a company outside the IT industry. Also, I hereby officially declare I've never used or owned an Apple product. I acknowledge I physically moved one from one department to another back in 1996. So much for your fanboy assumption. Criticize Apple all you wish, but by mentioning them alone you imply by omission that it is the only hardware company with these practices. This issue is industry-wide; failing to point that out may lead readers to buy other products in the mistaken belief other companies have clean hands. I refer to one of your earlier posts here: http://techrepublic.com.com/5208-1035-0.html?forumID=102&threadID=326073&messageID=3246559&tag=content;leftCol "The guy who did the 'Mission' mod (#6 in the list) should try and sell his idea to a compyter company like DELL." No mention of Dell's business practices. Were you not aware of them at the time of that post? "Everybody does it" doesn't excuse the behavior, but if literally everyone in the industry does it, how should this affect a purchasing decision? Should we not buy computers at all?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"Lastly, it's my fault, your fault, Palmettos' fault and everyone else here who idly stands by and votes for or does not vote against politicians who enact NAFTA and similar legislation that enables this kind of tyranny." You make unjustified assumptions. You have no previous interaction with me and know nothing about my voting history or my opinions of trade legislation. NAFTA has nothing to do with China. The 'NA' stands for 'North America' and is an agreement between the US, Canada, and Mexico. Further, raising the issue of trade agreements weaken your original position. Are you really concerned with the conditions of Chinese employees or just using your moral outrage as cover for your dislike of US trade policies? If there was no danger of US employment conditions deteriorating, would you still be as upset over factory conditions in China? You dilute your message by encompassing too many issues. I notice you don't mention anyone in the Chinese government as responsible for this. Why are US voters more responsible for the non-actions of Chinese government than those in positions of authority in that country? "...along with every single company that uses these slave labor production facilities." That's all I'm asking for, the acknowledgment that this issue isn't limited to Apple.

BlueCollarCritic
BlueCollarCritic

Wrong. Its APPLEs problem along with every single company that uses these slave labor production facilities. Its also the fault of our government for NAFTA and every other piece of legislative crap they?ve passed that makes it easier for corporations to off shore to slave labor enabled countries like China. Lastly, it?s my fault, your fault, Palmettos? fault and everyone else here who idly stands by and votes for or does not vote against politicians who enact NAFTA and similar legislation that enables this kind of tyranny. I did buy into the NAFTA BS when it was sold to us years back but now I know better and am no longer being suckered by the politicians. If however you are comfortable with this because all companies engage in it and so if all do it then its OK, just know that in a few more years there?s a good chance we may be looking at slave labor like conditions as our economy goes down the drain. Perhaps in a few years when it is you having to work 12-25 hours a day to make next to nothing, then maybe you?kk wake up to what?s going on. It will be too late of course but at least you?ll finally see the world for what it is.

BlueCollarCritic
BlueCollarCritic

Palmetto, I did read your reply, and the closest you come to anything non-positive is that you don't condone it. You still haven't validated your stance on why we can't criticize any company unless we explicitly list them all at the same time; even though the story we are replying to is about APPLE and not anyone else. Your reply is the kind worded to fend off criticism of APPLE without saying the slave thing is OK. Tell you what, I?ll finger point at Microsoft and say they too use slave labor run plants in China. Does that now make it OK to mention Apple or do I need to bullet point for you every single manufacturer in every industry?

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Simply because it's not Apple's problem, it's Foxconn's. Apple is only one of a half-dozen customers having products assembled at Foxconn. HP and Dell both are among those customers. Based on that, why aren't you griping that those companies are abusing their workers? Between them, HP and Dell have more than 3x as many devices built there as Apple does. Just because 11 people have committed suicide there doesn't mean they were all working on Apple products. This doesn't mean I condone the conditions that led to the suicides, I simply abhor statements singling out one client company as the cause when that same plant services several other clients as well.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Ed, you don't need to explicitly name every corporation with poor practices. Just acknowledge if one is going to factor in the human cost of Apple products, one must include those same costs when evaluating its competitors' products.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

The obvious point is that iPads are already in the workplace and in many cases saving money over previous methods, despite their supposedly high price. Quite literally, a lot of people have been using too much machine for very simple purposes. This is one of the reasons netbooks took off the way they did and the new generation of tablets is even better for those purposes. This isn't to say that they will replace all netbooks and notebooks, but for those people who don't need a full desktop OS, the new tablets will be the tool of choice.

dkoch
dkoch

The biggest thing for Exchange Administrators: the iPad breaks Outlook Web 2003. Our Exchange server has stopped processing mail twice in the past week because the log files completely filled the HDD - 0MB available. All because one of our users decided to ignore policy and synch their iPad with their Exchange account. The OWA and SMTP logfiles ballooned by over 10GB in less than 3 days because of the errors the iPad was generating. This user will probably lose their job (I can always hope) and Apple should get a good dressing-down for not being more forthcoming with this flaw.

jtruebe
jtruebe

Just disable ActiveSync by default and that will give your policy some teeth.

Tommy S.
Tommy S.

No iPad will get on our network. No AD credential, no network. Simple as that.

michealroy
michealroy

without iPad get on our network.then alsoNo AD credential, no network. nice thought and great explanation. online diploma | graduates diplomas | undergraduate diploma

dainathomas
dainathomas

Well .. I was waiting for it ... for quite a long time .. I am very disappointed with the features missing in the iPad.. like Camera and USB Ports .... for me USB ports are really very important .. I ll not use iPad Professionally.. not even personally ... yesterday I read abt Dell Streak .. somewhere .. now that sounds something promising ... with the basic features ... and all ... I hope it doesn't disappoints as iPad did ... and soon HP slate would be out and I hope it will not repeat the mistake made by Apple .. Best, Daina

irozenberg
irozenberg

Anybody remember Apple Newton? Would iPad be remembered in 2022? Great marketing and reasonably good design - Apple successes by defining a mainstream gizmo that everybody has to have as a symbol of social status.

treerod1
treerod1

Whether the iPad will succeed in business depends a lot on how you define business. I've had my 3G/WiFi 64GB iPad for about two weeks now and I've already come to rely on it to do my job. As a regulatory investigator/inspector, I just love my iPad. Okay, I wish it had a built-in camera to visually document the businesses I inspect, but hooking up and downloading the pictures from my digital camera to my iPad is not that big of a deal. I use the Bento app to record the business specific information ... I use the Dragon Dictation app for my notes and e-mail ... Photo app to store all my photos ... the Map app to help me find the business location ... and Beat the Traffic app to find the traffic conditions when I am either going to the business or returning to the office. I've even started using the Whistle VoIP app to make 'free' phone calls ... our agency's cell phones are charged for each phone call, no other fees apply though. But with Whistle, that's an additional savings to my agency. The best part of the iPad is the "breaking the ice" effect. Normally when I enter a site, the business owner or manager are in defense mode and tend to resist talking to me. Since I started using the iPad, the business owners can't stop talking, the only downside is they only want to talk only about the iPad. Before the iPad, I use to carry a boat anchor called a tablet PC, and even then I wrote down notes before entering it into the tablet. So for me, the iPad is a success story.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

exactly what I was getting at!

michealroy
michealroy

Great thought i really accept what you said. certificate Programs | postgraduate certificates

adamina
adamina

I really like to thanks to your thought. Belford University

fuzzybunnyfeet
fuzzybunnyfeet

then you need to learn how to communicate.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

I just don't need some device to 'break the ice' as it is put. I rely on non device, human methods for that.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

out of some people (not you Jason) who try to talk about the iPad in social / technical terms they really know nothing about (or did not until Apple produces some device and suddenly they pipe up and become experts). They are usally gray haired in their early 50's who say things like 'now we're cooking with gas' all the while trying to get in with the imaginary 'hip crowd'.

Don Beem
Don Beem

Gee. I'm taking on some gray hair in my early 50's - and "we're cooking with gas" isn't the first thing that came to my mind........

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

I could really recommend you not try to branch into psychology. By trying to stereotype people, you end up grossly underestimating them. Your terminology in your second paragraph honestly belongs to the 90-year-old group. The 50-year-old group is the one that brought out "Peace" and "Love" and Hippies, etc.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

then what the hell is... "The 50-year-old group is the one that brought out "Peace" and "Love" and Hippies, etc" Sounds like a stereotype to me.. Edited to draw further embarrassment to vulpine@. Fanatics can be such a pain in the neck!

santeewelding
santeewelding

The change in your photo is appropriate for this thread. But, it appears everywhere else, too. Will it be appropriate for, say, your comments elsewhere about the lovelorn and their sexually transmitted diseases?

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