Banking

CBS, BNET announce MoneyWatch.com to help navigate the recession

TechRepublic's sister site BNET is preparing to launch MoneyWatch.com this spring. It will offer pragmatic advice to help manage your career, your income, and your financial future.

TechRepublic's sister site BNET is to managers and business professionals as TechRepublic is to IT leaders and IT pros. It digs beneath the daily rush of news to provide actionable information that can help you be more effective at work.

Now BNET and CBS (disclaimer: both TechRepublic and BNET are owned by CBS Corp.) are preparing to launch a new site called MoneyWatch.com that will offer pragmatic advice to help manage your career, your income, and your financial future. Obviously, the timing is not a coincidence. We are in the midst of an extremely challenging economic environment that is endangering job security, devaluing 401K accounts, and putting future plans for education and retirement at risk.

Greg Mason, Senior Vice President of TechRepublic, ZDNet, and BNET, said, "Many people are still in shock because of recent financial events, and as a result they have a strong desire to become actively engaged in all facets of their finances. MoneyWatch.com will stand out for its relentless focus on helping people determine what they can believe these days and what they need to do now to manage their finances and take control."

MoneyWatch will offer its information in a multimedia experience that spans the Web, television, radio, and the smartphone. Here are the summary of the site's official charter and descriptions of its five sections:

The goal of MoneyWatch.com is to help you build and preserve wealth, from the day you earn your first paycheck to the day you spend your last dime, or leave it to your heirs. The process begins with smart decisions about your most important asset, your earning power, and moves on through a lifetime of choices about saving, spending, investing, and planning for retirement

  1. The Big Picture -Draws the connection between people's lives and the massive economic changes now in motion. It seeks to answer three questions for the audience: what's happening, what it means, and what people should do about it.
  2. Human Capital - Starts with the premise that a person's most valuable financial asset is their earning power. Using expert interviews, case studies and a signature "human capital value ticker," this section will cover topics including career strategies, income security, work/life balance, and health.
  3. Cash Flow - Focuses on the everyday money choices that people have to make. Topics include managing debt, minimizing taxes, paying for college, and enhancing the value of one's home.
  4. Investing - Features signature columnists and bloggers who will help people make smart, strategic choices about the preservation and growth of their wealth. The emphasis will be on realistic, low-risk strategies.
  5. Your Future - Helps people create a plan for financial independence. It will include retirement planning and Q&As with well-known wealth managers, helping people stay on track for the long-term.

The video clip below offers a quick introduction to MoneyWatch. You can also go to www.moneywatch.com to sign up for an alert when the site officially launches this spring.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

15 comments
Andrew Mager
Andrew Mager

Google Finance, Marketwatch, CNNMoney.com

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Nobody told me there was a recession, I better stop living in comfort and start pretending there's a recession! Recessions are for governments, and they sure like to force them between citizens ears too, as if they have anything to do with it. Live life, just as you do evey other day. Let the government sort out its own money woes.

JamesRL
JamesRL

Its not only the government, its the unemployed, those selling cars and houses, small businesses who can't get credit and so on.... If, and only if, your financial house is in order, you have little debt, a rainy day fund and some savings you can tap in case of emergency, then go out and take advantage of the bargains. And there are bargains. Personally, my variable rate mortgage looks good right now. I am rapidly paying it off. Gas is cheap. Cars are cheap (but I'm not buying). I am being cheap right now, but only because I have my trip to Europe planned for July. I can see an HD TV in my future (don't you have buddies there?) Not everyone has all the irons in the fire like you do Oz. I think for the average wage earner, some caution is warranted but no panic. If you are a car salesperson, panic might be in order. Jame

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

While it does actually sound quite inviting and would be really neat to do, if I get over this summer it'll probably be to join a band on a few festival stops though. So far they have festivals shows booked in Germany, Ireland and Northern England; Nickleback is supposed to be up for opening acts soon but I don't think they'd want to do it, even though the promotor is a friend in of the band's from the UK, they don't really like Nickleback or their demographic audience, nor do I. Perhaps out here and south later in the year but I'm not so interested in another Canada/US tour, those were the old days when I still hadn't seen it all. I could do a few Alberta, BC stops though, that's always fun and close to home. Summer in Europe though, doesn't get much better than that! You have some great stops in your itinerary, lots of stunning medievil architecture!

JamesRL
JamesRL

If you can make it to Toronto there is room on the trip... You have to pay what we pay. Ten days in Austria and Czech. Vienna, Eisenstadt (lake district), Salzburg, Danube cruise and Prague. A bunch of choir people who enjoy the odd alcoholic beverage. Pretty sure our concerts will include Carmina Burana, Faure Requiem, some Mozart (naturally), Handel. Save your pennies man. James

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I don't have a nest egg, nor a mortgage (which is both good and bad), I drive an older 4X4 (you've seen it, nothgin expensive at all). Somedays I can't afford to wipe my own....but that's irrelevant to me. When I was younger a car accident left me in a coma and I missed a chunk of my life. When I awoke, I didn't remember floating through a whte tunnel filled with relatives, I didn't get any great words of wisdom from 'the other side' or anything else, I didn't even recognize my own family standing at my bedside(yeah, GONZO'd!). But the trees sure looked green and the air through the window was like pure oxygen (or maybe that was just the oxygen mask I was wearing) but either way nothing had ever seemed more real and vivid and more ALIVE. and I was already a very positive and successful youth/young man beforehand. I value waking up in the morning, I value looking to the North Shore and seeing these insanely beautiful mountains. I value my friends and family, I value my ability to live in such a free and beautiful nation and do whatever my heart desires (within financial reason) whether camping, skiing, sailing, hiking, hanging out at a lake etc. I can, so I do. With all that there is to enjoy about living, I find it hard to worry about the trivial issues, and yes, recession is trivial to me. I have irons in the fire, that is true, plenty to fall back on and plenty o the go. I have more than one income from more than one country, but I am not 'well off' by any means, in fact I guarantee that MOST peers here are in a better financial position than me, I just really get off on life, so it seems I am on top of the world without a care. I get my 'other work' money in spurts and chunks, while for the most part it is just an average income (for what I do) just shy of the 100K mark, I don't consider music, editorial income to be liquid, it sits in banks and doesn't go anywhere but back into my projects, lawyers pockets and taxes. But, I am happy because I woke up today, pi$$ed right off that I now have a dead lower ball joint to replace this weekend, happy that its a gorgeous sunny day outside, bummed that its frickin cold too (no clouds to retain city heat),I am happy that I spoke to my mum at lunch and she's having a good day, I am bummed that I had to drag my butt back to the office and pretend to get some work done (on TR of course) but someone crying about a recession? Even worse, the GOVERNMENT WARNING me about a recession, forget it, I'm too busy just being awake and getting off on that alone. I'll let someone else worry while I enjoy my life instead. I am one of those people who don't let someone else's choice to have a crappy day make ME have a crappy day too, no matter how much they'd like to pass off their crap on me. If people choose to worry, as my mother does far too often but I think I'm rubbing off on her now, let them, they can do all the worrying, saving, preparing they want, I have a day to enjoy instead. yeah I get pi$$ed off, yes I get irritated and frustrated but more often than not I stop and remind myself, 'hey, you woke up again this morning, what are YOU bitching about? P.S. Europe, hope you have room in your suitcase for me, I'll only go one way. Debts? I thought I was the reason the banks went broke! HDTV, in Toronto? I can probably get you a lead to dealer pricing in your area anyway, let me know when you are closer to being in the market for one, I'd be happy to get a distributor in your area to call you and help you out if they can. all the best me

OldER Mycroft
OldER Mycroft

Wood-burning-powered PC. ;)

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Having a driving range across teh street from the office helps too. I usually hit a bucket a day to break up the day between seeing clients, when it gets a bit warmer out.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

About once a year, when the tension gets too high (usually just before I take vacation), I'll go to the driving range, grab a wood, and buy a bucket of balls. They may not go far and they may not go straight, but every ball gets a face...

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I don't bother thinking of anyone else when I am having ME time. If I am in front of a fire, that last thing I think about is other people. I love life, I just can't stand the people I have to share MY planet with; most of the animals and other life are pretty cool though, much better than people. If I had a choice between sitting under a tree and staring at a lake while pondering life's mysteries, or being surrounded by people doting on me as if I were God, I'd take the tree every time. People in general, just plain suck, cats are just fine though.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

if picturing faces of certain folks on the top of the log...

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Just so I have an excuse to go split wood all day. :) Sure beats sitting at a computer all day.

santeewelding
santeewelding

Let us not confuse it all with our own heartbeat and respiration.

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