iPad investigate

CIOs say iPad and other slates have a place in business

TechRepublic's CIO Jury sees a place for the Apple iPad and other slate PCs in business. See how they voted and why.

The Apple iPad and the various slate PCs coming from computer manufacturers in 2010 are being billed primarily as media consumption devices. However, TechRepublic recently asserted that this form factor could have a business impact as well. TechRepublic's CIO Jury agrees.

On February 3, TechRepublic polled its 100-member panel of U.S. IT executives and asked, "Is there a business case to be made for the iPad and other slate PCs?" The jury, made up of the first 12 respondents, came through with seven "Yes" votes and five "No" votes.

TechRepublic's CIO Jury is based on the original CIO Jury concept developed by Silicon.com, where you can find lively opinions from IT leaders based in the UK. Silicon.com's CIO Jury held its own vote on the iPad as a business tool.

Donna Trivison, Director of IT for Ursuline College, said, "Yes, there is a business case which can be made for iPad or other convenient, easy to use tablet computers. The iPod Touch /iPad is instant on, instant off, and instant load. This aspect alone makes a compelling business case. Time is money. Though I'm not sure if that would be considered a function of tablet per se. It is more a function of iPhone operating system and multi-touch user interface, push one button, touch one icon. App loads and performs flawlessly. All apps (a.k.a., software) have a standardized look and feel... Elegant, functional, revolutionary."

Mitchell Gibbs, Vice President of Services at Advocate Charitable Foundation, said, "While I'm not sold on the iPad - too limited in functionality - the form factor has a lot of potential, especially in vertical markets like healthcare. We currently have tablet PCs in active use and making them lighter, faster, with better battery life is only going to drive the business case."

Others agreed that health care IT is a clear target for this form factor. Jay Rollins, Vice President of IT for Trilogy Health Services, said, "[It's] still early, but in healthcare, iPads would be great for electronic charting applications. No need for in-room kiosks, and the price point is pretty good as well."

Matthew Metcalfe, Director of IS for Northwest Exterminating, said "For mobile employees there is certainly a case for it. Hospitals and their tablets have proven the concept."

Lisa Moorehead, Director of IT for MA Dept of Public Utilities, said, "Slate PCs are the latest tech toy. The screens break and get damaged too easily. I can see some benefit in a hospital campus environment for reading x-rays, diagrams, etc. but, not unless the screens can be hardened."

Other CIO Jury members were also concerned about the durability of the iPad. "They will have to be much more rugged then they are now," said David Van Geest, Director of IT for The Orsini Group.

Several CIOs expressed skepticism about whether slates would have enough power and connectivity to be effective. "Until the business workforce becomes mobile and the slates develop a natural user interface that is truly usable, and have the horsepower/connectivity to run applications required for business users to function, there will be little need other than as a 'curiosity' or 'toy,'" said Michael Woodford, Executive Director of IT for USANA Health Sciences, Inc.

Joel Robertson, Director of IT for King College in Bristol, TN, has a problem with the iPad specifically. "Yes for the slate but not for the iPad. The incompatibility with non-Apple apps and the lack of built in expansion ports would prevent us from considering the iPad."

Others doubted the short-term effects but still saw potential. David Wilson, Director of IT for VectorCSP, said "I believe that the immediate impact will be small, but the possibility of using these as e-book / document readers alone is enough to intrigue me."

Delano Gordon, CIO of Roofing Supply Group in Dallas, Texas, said, "In our case, I can see an immediate use for board meetings."

TechRepublic's CIO Jury on this topic was:

  1. Chuck Codling, Director of Infrastructure for Rocky Brands, Inc.
  2. David Van Geest, Director of IT for The Orsini Group
  3. Mark Westhoff, Director of IT for Lincolnshire-Prairie View School District
  4. Lisa Moorehead, Director of IT for MA Dept of Public Utilities
  5. Randy Krzyston, Director of IT for Thomas Jefferson School of Law
  6. Mike Woodford, Executive Director of IT for USANA Health Sciences, Inc.
  7. Chris Brown, Vice President of Technology for Big Splash Web Design
  8. Michael Stoyanovich, CIO of BeneSys
  9. Matthew Metcalfe, Director of IS for Northwest Exterminating
  10. Jerry Justice, IT Director of SS&G Financial Services
  11. Mitchell Gibbs, Vice President of Services at Advocate Charitable Foundation
  12. John Gracyalny, Director of IT for SafeAmerica Credit Union

Would you like to be part of TechRepublic's CIO Jury and have your say in the hottest issues for IT departments? If you are a CIO, CTO, IT director or equivalent at a large or small company in the private or public sector and you want to be part of TechRepublic's CIO Jury pool, drop us a line.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

170 comments
jfreedle2
jfreedle2

If someone was using an iPad to try and be a business tool, I would not only fire them, but they would be black balled from working again.

Zithrob
Zithrob

Sharp, Casio, HP, or generic, if the numbers add up at the end of the day, the calculator manufacturer doesn't make the difference. The PERSON using the calculator makes the difference. "White cat, black cat - I don't care as long as it catches mice." Evidence based business decisions will benefit your company more than your personal prejudice.

jfuller05
jfuller05

one of the early critics of using Powerpoint as a business tool. We see how that played out. :)

jragosta
jragosta

@jfreedle2: I guess your point is that you're a mindless drone who can't imagine anyone being able to use something just because you don't like it. How about some specifics on why it can't be used a a business tool? Specifically - and explain why your requirements should apply to all businesses. For example, I can think of several business uses. Tell me why someone should be fired for: 1. Using an iPad for PowerPoint presentations at a trade show. It's nearly impossible to hold a conventional laptop while standing next to a customer, but the iPad would be perfect. 2. Simple, light, easy on way to show catalogs to customers in the field. 3. Reading of technical manuals in the field. There are millions of applications, but you're too juvenile/incompetent/unimaginative to see any of them.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

What are your IT credentials that allow you to talk about computer technology with authority? Once again silence. Your opinion is worth nothing here now. Still silence I see - your alter ego is posting away however.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Just because it doesn't fill one business' needs doesn't mean it won't fill others. Just because it doesn't fill one business' needs as currently configured doesn't mean it won't fill them in later models. Even I'm willing to grant it has niche application. Apparently jfreelde2 hires 'Yes men' and stifles innovation.

edge2100
edge2100

why have such a closed mind? Let's be realistic, the iPad has a long, long way to go before it will be replacing laptops. However, it is heading in a direction that the computing world is going. No, I'm not some Apple lunatic, in fact I am more of a PC fan if I had to choose between the two. Saying you would fire someone for trying a new idea though...? You might as well say "let's not make any advances in technology for the rest of time, and if you do...you're firrrrrred!"

reed
reed

They certainly do have a place. I place them under the server room door to hold it open when the cooling system is offline for yearly maintenance. Since I've had the good fortune to work on several models I can safely say I would rather run windows 7 on a 286 than power up a netbook. Since the iPad will run just like the nearly useless iPhone I can't see it as much more than a novelty.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Perhaps this will explain how it works and show you that the Citrix client requires a Citrix Server and all the software you want to run installed on another machine, where it runs... http://community.citrix.com/download/attachments/115345826/Citrix_ICAProxySplashns.jpg Citrix runs Windows and Windows Applications from a central server, called XenDesktop, and pipes it out to your mobile device through the NetScaler AGEE. http://www.brianmadden.com/Library/blog/BrianMadden/Citrix%20Presentation%20Server%20XenDesktop%20Venn%20Diagram.jpg Data centre hardware and licence costs aside you need to pay between $450 and $600 more to get XenApp and actually have applications go from the data center to the iPad. Hope that has cleared everything up for those that do not understand what Citrix is, how it works and what you need to run it. If you are still confused, hire an IT Pro.

jragosta
jragosta

Amazing that you STILL don't get it. If the customer needs Citrix, they'll have it regardless of whether they're using an iPad or a netbook. If they don't need Citrix, there's Go To My PC which doesn't require an IT department. But for MOST people, neither of those is needed.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Go to My PC does not support the touch or iPhone. GoToMyPC now provides the ability to remotely access a computer running a Mac operating system (Mac OS 10.5 and higher) or a PC (Windows 2000 and above, Windows XP or higher) Amazing Even if they create it - no IT Manager in their right mind would allow that kind of free roam 1-1 (no central policy server or VPN) with a PC from outside the company. Quite the Scarecrow are you not.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

You say: "IT's job to find the best way to meet that requirement." Then you just decide you know the best way to meet it and tell them. What are your IT credentials? Note: I studied Computer Science - not IT. That would be the science of computers.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

My question was based in ignorance, not negativity. The few I've attend usually have more potential clients around a booth than reps available to provide dedicated individual attention. Usually I prefer to review the material / presentation / whatever without a rep hovering over me, then approach him or her if I have additional interest.

jragosta
jragosta

"You say - "It then becomes IT's job to find the best way to meet that requirement." ipad or no ipad - it is up to IT. You said it!" No, I didn't. I have specific needs and the iPad meets it. If IT can suggest something that will do the same thing and do it as well, I'm happy to look at it. But they do not have the right to reject my needs. So tell me, what other device will meet all of my needs as well as the iPad? There isn't one.

jragosta
jragosta

"If you're using this at a trade show, I assume you're handing it directly to the potential customer." Of course not. Typically at a trade show, the sales person holds a brochure in one hand and points out features with the other hand. They stand side by side with the customer while they do so. The iPad would work the same way. Sales person holding it and showing it to a customer by his side. This type of arrangement doesn't work with a conventional laptop. Why do you make every assumption in the most negative way you can? A moment's thought would have shown your 'concern' to be baseless.

jragosta
jragosta

You can remotely wipe an iPhone, so I don't know why it would be impossible on the iPad.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If you're using this at a trade show, I assume you're handing it directly to the potential customer. As he looks at the presentation and has a question, does he have to pass it back to your rep so the rep can see what page the customer is looking at? Isn't that going to involve handing the device back and forth a lot? Wouldn't this to easier with a device both could view at the same time? I don't expect the rep to stand at the customer's shoulder the entire time, but this sounds inconvenient. If this device is for 'mobile content delivery', it appears capable of reaching only one person at a time. Maybe it will turn out to be great for this application, but this is still a niche app and hardly worth the attention the media is giving the device.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

You say - "It then becomes IT's job to find the best way to meet that requirement." ipad or no ipad - it is up to IT. You said it!

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

or leave it behind - what options are available for a remote wipe of the device?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"If I, as an executive, think that I can use an iPad to give presentations at trade shows, ..." "My position is simply that, as an executive manager, I have responsibility for the strategic direction of the company and execution of the strategy. It should be the executive team that drives the business - not any single department." "Just how in the world is the selection of which computer we use strategic? Why would it matter one bit whether we use a Dell or HP computer for our engineers? ... We come up with requirements: ... It then becomes IT's job to find the best way to meet that requirement." EXACTLY. Now, why are you wasting your strategic time making the decision to use an iPad without allowing IT to investigate the alternatives? Do you want us to do our jobs, or do it for us? I've tried to keep this discussion off the personal level, but you insist on making personal judgments on people based solely on their web posts. If I'm a prime example of what's wrong with IT, you're a prime example of what's wrong with management: make a decision based on the latest trend, and then blame others when it proves to be ill-advised.

jragosta
jragosta

You could start by learning about the product before you condemn it. (Although you appear to be a typical IT person in that respect - see something that doesn't suit you, so you condemn it for everyone). Look at your complaints: - No connection to video. First, this is irrelevant for many of the uses I plan. Standing at a trade show with your customer doesn't require a projector. Second, there IS a video cable attachment (VGA) for it. Third, there are wireless projectors Fourth, with a tiny USB adapter, you could put the presentation onto a USB stick and use it to drive the projector (many projectors will work straight from USB) Four ways around your 'problem'. But more importantly, you're missing the entire point. I don't think that the iPad was ever intended to be used to drive projectors much. You're probably going to do most of your content CREATION on a full computer. The iPad is for mobile content delivery. It can drive a projector, though, if you wish. - USB ports First, you get the presentation on it by wireless - or eMail. Second, any mobile professional who doesn't have his presentation pre-installed before he gets to his customer's site is a fool. It should be on there before he leaves home. If something new comes up, wireless works fine. Third, if you don't like 802/11, then buy the 3G version (I assume that you're capable of determining which version you need). Fourth, if none of those works, you can get an inexpensive USB adapter. Maybe you'd do better to learn something about a product before you condemn it - or let the people who run the company or who would be using the device decide whether it's useful to them.

jragosta
jragosta

"Do you consider hardware selection a strategic decision?" Wow. The fact that you would even ask that question is a clear indication that you have no idea what it means to define the strategic direction of a company. I run a manufacturing company. We make products that are sold around the world. Our competitive advantage is being able to design and build high quality products for a good price. Just how in the world is the selection of which computer we use strategic? Why would it matter one bit whether we use a Dell or HP computer for our engineers? We come up with requirements: we need a reliable, efficient, price-effective computer that allows our engineers to design things (or our accountants to calculate finances or our sales people to communicate with customers). It then becomes IT's job to find the best way to meet that requirement. If IT becomes aware of a new technology, they present it to the management team - but it is NOT IT's job to say 'we're going to implement this new technology'. It's management's role to make that decision. You're a prime example of what has gone wrong with IT over the past decades. You're in your cubby hole thinking that everything you do is strategic and the rest of the company should answer to your least little whim. Sorry, IT is a service, not the leader. "Do you consider hardware selection a strategic decision?" Amazing.

edge2100
edge2100

I heard talk about it, and it could be all rumors, but I thought they were putting out a dongle that would allow you to project the iPad. Yay another thing to carry around! Although it is annoying, like the macbook you need a dongle as well, but it would get the job done---if that is even fact, which I don't know.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

you rose through the ranks and have a solid and proven technical background in IT technology.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Do you consider hardware selection a strategic decision?

major.malfunction
major.malfunction

IT's job is always to find a better mouse trap. I've always told my employees that if you don't learn something new everyday in IT, you are doing your job wrong. Still, I haven't found enough positives with the iPad to be able to want/need to get it into the enterprise. As far as the iPad doing presentations, its almost worthless other than a 1:1 demo. It's a 10" screen and there is no video out to hook up a projector. So there is really no native way to get a presentation out to the masses and it becomes a 1:1 usage only. Also, there are no USB ports. How to get the presentations on/off it? And if you can't get a wireless connection at the demo site, its not like you can say "I'll just use the Internet to do it!". Any road warrior will tell you that relying on a wireless connection once you get there can be a no-go. These scenarios are from experience and I can't see how I want to introduce another device into that unless I can EASILY bypass those kinds of problems.

major.malfunction
major.malfunction

Why are you hell bent on breaking the balls of "incompetent IT" people? If your whole business is dependent on technology, don't you think you want the best prepared people in those areas? Or do you just want yes-men that just do nothing but wait for your next command? I'm the one who ends up fixing crapware at 3Am on a saturday morning because of stupid decisions by CEOs to get brand X rather than brand Y. Did you ever stop to think about that for once? That's why we open our mouths about doing stuff that probably isn't the best solution. If I worked for you, I would offer you my expert opinion on the subject. And yes, I am an expert since that is why you hired me in the first place, right? And then I would tell you exactly what I tell any overbearing CEO "But, if that is really what you want, then that is what we will do. But I think you are creating more problems then you you are solving. But since your decision is final, let's get started". Instead, you come off as an ignoramus jerk who can barely stand your IT people telling you anything different than your opinion. Anyone that brags that they have fired many an IT person (or any singled out employee type) is certainly a J.O. in anyone's book.

edge2100
edge2100

I think that is where having an open mind comes into play. I think I mentioned it in one of my previous posts---think of what you need to do and how the device will help you accomplish the task. If the device can deeply impact the way keynotes (dare I say PowerPoint) can be delivered, then it would be worth it. IT's job should not be finding ways to prevent things from happening, they should be supporting the technology that is needed and figure out ways to make it happen (like you said). However, since we don't know enough about the device still, I do worry about security issues that it could bring.

jragosta
jragosta

You just proved that you're incompetent to play a significant strategic role in a business. I never said that I should make decisions 'just because I said so'. Nor did anything I say suggest micromanagement. My position is simply that, as an executive manager, I have responsibility for the strategic direction of the company and execution of the strategy. It should be the executive team that drives the business - not any single department. Specifically, in the case of the iPad, I told you exactly why I would be buying them. Rather than listen to my explanation, you said I wanted them simply because I liked them. That's not the case. There is a solid business case for the iPad. If there is a security issue (and there wouldn't be the way I envision them being used), IT can point that out, preferably with a solution. Simply rejecting the iPad because YOU don't like it is outside your job responsibilities. Like many incompetent IT managers, you seem to think that the business should revolve around IT. Wrong. IT is one of the functions driving the business. IT has no more right to tell managers how to run the business than the sales department or the shop foreman. You have a role - but it's NOT telling managers how to run the company.

MytonLopez
MytonLopez

Hats of to you for this post. I agree. I remember when the iPhone first came out and alot of managers and executives had to have one and kept trying to justify why they needed one and guess what they didn't get one for we already had a BES in place and they already had company issued black berry's. If you really want one go buy one on your dime. It looks like Sony and Google are also looking into building a tablet. Why not wait to see what else comes up and wait till all the reviews are out than make a decision.

major.malfunction
major.malfunction

I've been in IT for 20+ years. I've had many an argument with bosses like you and in most cases, changed their closed mind thinking and/or left the company. Who wants to work for a tyrant? First off, since you are a CEO, do you see me telling you how to run the company, make personnel decisions, etc? Your expertise is business operations and NOT technology. If it was, you wouldn't need me to be the CTO or the IT Manager, now would you? If the CEO is going make the technology decisions for the company, the only IT people that will work for you are "yes men sheep" who are afraid their skills aren't good enough to get another job. IT's roll is NOT to take orders from the CEO. IT's roll is to support the company infrastructure, to utilize the existing company owned technology to the fullest, and to leverage new technology into the business IF it is cost effective AND better than the current technology. I certainly realize who signs my check, but I also realize that YOU telling me to implement something simply because you liked the commercial for it is probably a bad idea for the other 100 employees that work here AND its my job to objectively evaluate it. But micromanaging petty tyrants like you simply want it since YOU said its a good idea! Regardless if your own people would tell you that there is an easier way to do it and that since we already have to send them out with laptops to do their business work. Why send another device, too? And don't get me started about integrating Apple products into the Enterprise. Apple's main target audience is the 12-25 yr old disposable income bracket, not the business enterprise...but I'm sure you know that as a know-it-all CEO. In the end, you want your company to use the iPad simply because you like it and that your IT dept. isn't capable of making ANY decisions for the company! Why not tell your accounting dept. to stop using QuickBooks simply because YOU don't like it? Its obvious you know better than all your department heads, right? Its your right as the CEO to make decisions, but making decisions based simply on "Because I said so" is certainly stupid.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

be my guest, on every tech whim you wish. At the end of the day I assume you have a board or shareholders to answer to. Forget the many years of training and education I have be able to really understand and use technology. Hey, you must know better. That is what is wrong with most businesses today. Why hire someone and then just ignore their views on subjects you hired them about! But when the bank comes a calling, or things fall apart, remember my post with a warm glow. If you have no board or shareholders, then you are not worth the worry about in the first place.

jragosta
jragosta

The problem is that you have no clue how a real business SHOULD be run. You're one of those IT people who thinks that the business revolves around you. Since you don't personally like Apple products, you'll do everything in your power to ensure that no one else can use them. I've fired IT people who thought that they ran the company and the company was there to serve their wishes. Instead, IT's role is to support the company needs. If I, as an executive, think that I can use an iPad to give presentations at trade shows, it's not IT's job to stop me. It's their job to figure out how to do it.

jragosta
jragosta

"Nearly all the comment seem to be "an iPad like device that did not have the shortcomings of the iPad would be useful"" That's because the jury is a bunch of Apple-bashing IT types that we've seen for years. They refuse to learn anything about Macs or Apple products, yet are extremely vocal in denouncing them. Let's look at some of their complaints: - Won't run standard apps. That's nonsense. Citrix has alreaady announced an iPad client so you can run all your WIndows apps. - Poor calendaring. Just what do they want? iCal works fine for most people, but if you need something different, use Citrix. - Durability. It's interesting how several of them comment that they need something more durable - yet they've never seen or used the product. How did they become prescient? - Speed. There are complaints about speed and networking - and, again, they've never used the product. Almost everyone who used it raved about the speed. - Expansion ports. This one's really nuts. Who needs expansion ports in a slate that is designed to be tied to the cloud? - No support for USB scanners. Wrong. There's a USB adapter available. It will cost a few dollars more, but even so, it's way less expensive than the HP slate that these people will be raving about. What you have is a bunch of IT managers with no vision, no imagination, and a complete unwillingness to consider anything but Microsoft products. The same people who said for decades that Macs are toys (sure, the dual Xeon 32 MB Mac Pro is some toy), that the iPod would never sell, and that no one would buy an iPhone. Please stop with giving these narrow-minded bigots any more visibility.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Even Linux advocates agree running a Windows app under Wine or Cedaga doesn't qualify as Linux itself running the app. I wonder how those Citrix-hosted apps are going to look? Many Windows-based apps are now designed for 1024x768. Toss in the screen space lost to the keyboard and they may be difficult to see.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

See the reply - they even admit the fact.

jragosta
jragosta

Maybe you should learn how Citrix works. You WILL BE running the app natively on Windows. Only the screen display is on the iPad. Maybe you should start by learning how something works before criticizing it. As for the keyboard, it is presumably like the iPhone. The keyboard is only in the way when you're actually typing - not all the time. Once again, stop bashing things that you don't understand.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

From research... jragosta Jan 26, 2010 - 1:13 PM You admitted that you're not a shareholder. I am. I'm happy. So the evidence we have is that 100% of shareholders are happy with the results and how they were reported and 0% of the people who have no financial interest in the matter. I've talked with quite a few shareholders. Every single one was bright enough to realize that Apple was changing its reporting and based their decision to buy, hold, or sell on that information. The information was readily available so any reasonable shareholder would have found it. It's only the loud-mouthed Apple-bashing bloggers who seem to have an issue with it. http://www.betanews.com/joewilcox/article/Once-you-dig-deeper-Apples-record-quarter-is-not-so-impressive/1264484059 'glazed' eyes :-) Willing to bet the company you preside over use PC's and not Mac.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

that stated they were a shareholder? Or was that just a 'big up' in front of the lads? Besides - I see no support for your views here.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

The opinions I present are my own. If I've quoted anyone here, it's only in direct response to the person being quoted. In one case I agreed with vulpine, but I was only agreeing with him, not defending him. If my expressed opinions happen to match those of those of others, it's not with the goal of defending anyone. "...please name another equivalent which will do everything the iPad does that weighs less?" How about an iPod? It weighs even less but will do the same things. It maybe harder to do them but look at the weight your saving. Name an item at the iPad's weight that will do everything a Dell Latitude XT will does. It maybe easier to do somethings than the iPad, but look at the weight you have to carry. One man's 'perfect balance' is another man's 'not enough features to be useful' is another man's 'too heavy to be portable'. But tell me, what business use do you plan to implement with an iPad that you can't do with existing platforms? I believe you said something about trade shows. Do you see these as replacing the laptops or tablets your company reps are presumably already toting?

jragosta
jragosta

"Only that they don't do anything new. If it only takes one important use, couldn't you save a lot of money and ensure availability by equipping that one user with a lighter weight conventional tablet, letting it run apps locally and independent of a WiFi / cellular connection?" Then why are you defending the IT 'experts' who said that there was no place for them in IT? As for the rest, please name another equivalent which will do everything the iPad does that weighs less? You are also missing the point that a new device doesn't need to do anything completely new to be interesting. In fact, you could argue that 99% of innovations don't really do anything new - they just do things better than the prior art. The same is true of the iPad. No one ever said it would do things that no computer had ever done before. That's one of your typical straw man arguments. But it DOES offer a balance of power, ease of use, size, weight, and features that lots of people find attractive. You may not - that's your choice. But lots of people do - so, once again, the people you are defending (who claim that there's no place for iPads in business) are just plain wrong.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Only that they don't do anything new. If it only takes one important use, couldn't you save a lot of money and ensure availability by equipping that one user with a lighter weight conventional tablet, letting it run apps locally and independent of a WiFi / cellular connection?

jragosta
jragosta

"If one doesn't already have a Citrix server, how many iPads are required to make it economically feasible to deploy one to host apps for them?" One. If the application and user are important enough. Once again, you just don't get it. It's a tool. It will be useful for some applications and not for others. No one ever suggested that iPads would take over the computing world and were going to be used everywhere. But the statement that they have NO use (which is what many of the IT 'experts' and a lot of the posters here are saying ) is just plain wrong. I'm a company CEO and I'm going to buy some for presentations at trade shows. That alone completely disproves the statement that they have no place. Those saying that they have NO place are wrong. Period. End of discussion. What part of that is too complicated for you?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If one doesn't already have a Citrix server, how many iPads are required to make it economically feasible to deploy one to host apps for them? If one is a user, one shouldn't care. If one is in IT, one should acknowledge there is a difference between running an app on a device and remotely connecting to a host to run it, and not talk about the two configurations as if they are interchangeable. Running apps natively on a $500 device doesn't require several thousand dollars in additional infrastructure. Since the device won't run Windows apps by itself, then the question is whether the TCO, including that new Citrix farm, is justified.

jragosta
jragosta

I'm glad you finally figured out how Citrix works. "All the iPad or any other Citrix client runs is the connectivity piece. The client connects to the app running ON THE SERVER." Now, if I'm the user and need a Windows app, why should I care (other than, of course, the fact that it will run much faster on the server than on a handheld client). Bottom line is that the complaint about it not running Windows apps is just plain misguided. I can get the same results, regardless of where the app is running.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

All the iPad or any other Citrix client runs is the connectivity piece. The client connects to the app running ON THE SERVER. If a car is on a ferry, that's not the same thing as a car being able to drive on water.

jragosta
jragosta

Once again, you can't refute my arguments so you resort to ad hominem attacks. Why is it that you are unable to refute the arguments I've presented and instead have to try to post irrelevant stuff like whether or not I'm a shareholder (and, of course, you have no way of knowing, anyway). If my arguments are wrong, refute them. So far, you haven't been able to - all you can do is these silly personal attacks.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

your points on the iPad are now worthless. I can 'use' the internet you know. More may follow...

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

- Won't run standard apps. That's nonsense. Citrix has alreaady announced an iPad client so you can run all your WIndows apps. It still can't RUN the apps can it????? - Poor calendaring. Just what do they want? iCal works fine for most people, but if you need something different, use Citrix. It still can't RUN the app can it????? - Durability. It's interesting how several of them comment that they need something more durable - yet they've never seen or used the product. How did they become prescient? Based on other apple products. See what they do with Windows...same thing here... - Speed. There are complaints about speed and networking - and, again, they've never used the product. Almost everyone who used it raved about the speed. Where, show me these people. 3G, WAN, WiFi..what? We all know the 3G speeds that are capable and the power of it's processor. - Expansion ports. This one's really nuts. Who needs expansion ports in a slate that is designed to be tied to the cloud? How do I get the data from my camera? - No support for USB scanners. Wrong. There's a USB adapter available. It will cost a few dollars more, but even so, it's way less expensive than the HP slate that these people will be raving about. Really, I assume you used this USB scanner - considering you past posts or however could comment on it.

Niall Baird
Niall Baird

What *they* are saying is that the iPad in its current form is not useful - funnily enough, that's pretty much what you're saying too. 1. Can't run the standard apps UNLESS you run them via Citrix. 2. Poor Calendaring - if iCal is not good enough, use Citrix 3. Expansion ports - your argument just doesn't add up. Have you thought about printing, saving to a server/ext hard drive? 4. No support for USB scanners - oh that's right, go and buy a dongle & make Apple richer... Seriously, if you're going to argue, at least make your points differ from those on the other side!

edge2100
edge2100

There are certainly techniques apple uses that are VERY annoying. I use both apple and PC by the way--and we are 50/50 at my job. The change VGA adapters virtually on ever release which is confusing to support when you have a bunch of macs in different years. So lack of connections and needing to buy all these dongles isn't a good option. OK speed I can't speak for, all I know is the 3G is already overloaded and i think the iPhone/iTouch is a bit slow on wifi. If the iPad is faster, then that is a step in the right direction. iCal, I will give you that--that is a question of adapting to the software. It's there--use it or don't--you can merge with Google Cal right? I don't know about Outlook since we don't use that.

jragosta
jragosta

Are you really so clueless? The iPad IN ITS CURRENT FORM does all those things. Sure, if you want your Windows desktop on it, you have to spend a couple of dollars, but you have to spend money on Office if you buy a Windows slate, as well. The fact that something is optional is not the same as saying it's not available. No one in their right mind expects the base, default configuration to have everything that anyone could ever want- which is what you're suggesting. Your argument on expansion ports is a pretty good example of the lack of imagination that these IT people suffer. You can already print from the iPhone via wireless, so there's no reason to believe that the iPad won't print. You can connect to a server via wireless. You can add an external hard drive via USB or via wireless (yes, I realize that you have this bizarre concept that the device has to do every possible thing out of the box, but that's completely absurd).

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Why is it that so few people can envision something different from what's in front of their noses? Why is it that every new technology has the vast majority saying, "It won't work!" and yet discover they're forced to accept the new technology within a very few years or get left so far behind they [i]can't[/i] catch up? I remember when people were decrying desktop computers as a toy and a fad because corporations already had thousands of individual terminals tied to a single mainframe in the basement. And yet, within 5 years of their introduction, desktop computers had taken over in almost every enterprise. They even broke into mom & pop Point-of-Sale operations within 10 years. Why? Because they were faster and more efficient than doing it by hand and didn't have the time-sharing issues of mainframe/terminal operations. Big-block portables came next, followed very quickly by the first notebooks and the laptops we know now. Each of these changes felt resistance by the 'establishment.' How about going farther back? "If man were meant to fly, we'd have wings!" "Get a horse!" "Going faster than a horse can run will suffocate you!" I'm not saying the iPad will be as great a change as any of these, but even small changes saw resistance until their practicality was proven. Anyone remember the old mechanical adding machines? Where did these little electronic calculators come from that are so ubiquitous today? Oh, that's right, that adding machine was simply too big and too heavy to fit into that first Freedom capsule. Stop saying "No," and look at what it might do for you instead. You'd be surprised at what it's already doing when you use the iPhone as a proxy.

jragosta
jragosta

"You like Apple and their products? Fine, but their is no need to disrespect those who do not feel that Apple is the be all and end all of computing. I don't like Apple products and the lock-in which comes with them." I couldn't care less whether you like Apple products. I DO care when mindless bloggers quote mindless IT personnel and lie to the public. It drives down stock prices as well as affecting purchasing decisions for millions of people. So why is it that you feel obligated to defend someone who's flat out lying?

SKDTech
SKDTech

"Do you spend your whole life trying to defend bone-headed IT people who can't get even the most basic facts right? " Do you spend your whole life hunting down any article or comment which reflects negatively on Apple in order to "show them the error of their ways?" You like Apple and their products? Fine, but their is no need to disrespect those who do not feel that Apple is the be all and end all of computing. I don't like Apple products and the lock-in which comes with them.

jragosta
jragosta

None of your comments have any relevance to the topic at hand. Sure, some companies already have laptops. Some companies are cheapskates. Some companies might choose some other products. But NONE of that justifies the bone-headed errors made by the IT 'experts' quoted. They claimed that the iPad wouldn't do those things. They were wrong. If they had claimed that there were other solutions, that would be accurate. If they had claimed that there were cheaper solutions, that would be accurate. If they had claimed that the iPad wasn't for everyone, that would be accurate. BUT THEY DIDN'T. They said the iPad wouldn't do certain things - and they were 100% wrong. Do you spend your whole life trying to defend bone-headed IT people who can't get even the most basic facts right?

MytonLopez
MytonLopez

There is other options than HP's slate like a netbook, a laptop, and etc.. That's just the business side. If your just looking for a tablet type of device Check out the joojo - https://thejoojoo.com/sites/ . Microsoft will eventually release the courier and add the features the iPad lacks. Check it out - http://gizmodo.com/5365299/courier-first-details-of-microsofts-secret-tablet If you want to talk about cables and you already own a iTouch or iPhone than just buy a connector to connect to TV - http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1454 This is way cheaper and you have an even bigger screen and use your iPhone or iTouch like a remote and view on the TV. I mentioned earlier that companies already have the laptops, tablets, in place and they already own volume license so if needed they can re-install if needed. If they want to install Office on their netbook, tablet, or laptop guess what they most like have a license already available which is more cost effective. Your right the IT experts say it won't run non-Apple apps which gives you more reason to use a laptop, netbook, or tablet pc that have the connectors and peripherals. An iPad is more of an cool factor "look what I have". I don't think everyone is going to jump on the bandwagon with this but that is jsut my personal opinion.

jragosta
jragosta

Your comments are silly. For starters, the HP slate is supposed to be well over $1 K. That leaves plenty of money to buy a USB adapter for the iPad. More importantly, you're changing the subject. The IT 'experts' in the original article said that the iPad wouldn't run non-Apple apps, wouldn't connect to peripherals, etc. They didn't say it was expensive, they said it couldn't be done. They were clearly wrong - so nothing else about their opinions has any validity.

MytonLopez
MytonLopez

I can see you have alot of experience justifying spending more money than needed "Sure, if you want your Windows desktop on it, you have to spend a couple of dollars, but you have to spend money on Office if you buy a Windows slate, as well." If I buy a netbook or a tablet I can install any version of Windows or Office that is compatible for that device for companies buy a volume license and it is already paid for. Sou your rational is to spend more on the same thing you already paid for. Good job. :)