Networking

Dallas and Columbus are the most lucrative cities for IT pros

IT professionals have long known that the best salaries are in the biggest cities where there are big companies and big computer networks. At least that's the conventional wisdom. TechRepublic's 2008 IT Skills and Salary Report calls that thinking into question.

IT professionals have long known that the best salaries are in the biggest cities where there are big companies and big computer networks. At least that's the conventional wisdom. TechRepublic's 2008 IT Skills and Salary Report calls that thinking into question.

One of the most surprising data points in the report is average salary by U.S. city. The top two cities on the list are Dallas, Texas ($79,783) and Columbus, Ohio ($79,421). New York City ($78,278) is No. 3, but Chicago ($72,477) is just 18th on the list and Los Angeles ($71,972) is all the way down at No. 20. Tech hotbeds San Francisco ($74,016) and San Jose ($75,754) are 16th and 12th, respectively.

Besides Dallas and Columbus, there were a few other surprises in the top 10. St. Louis ($77,350) came in at No. 6, Baltimore ($77,084) was No. 8, and Sacramento ($76,566) was No. 10.

Here's the full list of the top 20:

You can also download the full 2008 IT Skills and Salary Report:

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

13 comments
madhuri_a10
madhuri_a10

Columbus is small, beautiful and cheaper city than Dallas. Theres nothing much to do in Columbus but then you dont end up spending your earnings

stephen.hood
stephen.hood

This is misleading as the cost of living in Dallas is A LOT more than Houston, for example. The cost of living in Austin is even worse...probably the highest in the state.

mark9009
mark9009

And the taxes in Texas are high. No state tax but everything you purchase is taxed. Also, local taxes are eating into the local prices. Long story, but Katrina and the influx of illegals from both borders (Oklahoma and Mexico) has taken it's toll on everything from crime, healthcare, transportation, energy and education. California has similar problems but I live in Dallas and it's just as expensive as Chicago.

kehill50
kehill50

Believe it or not, for the Columbus area, those numbers(Representative) for a Software Developer is somewhat accurate. Eventhough I am below with regards to the salary by job function. Think I will go ask the Boss for a raise now....!!!!!

seanferd
seanferd

It's six figures. I do believe an extra 7 crept in to the most significant position.

Enoelf
Enoelf

Not from where I am standing. After looking at this skills report, I nearly choked looking at the 48k salary for a Help Desk Support position. I don't believe these numbers are an accurate reflection of the salary levels in this area. I have been in the Technical Support business for more than 10 years, and this type of salary doesn't exist for a person that takes calls, answers emails and helps customers resolve problems in a call center/help desk environment.

CEdwards478
CEdwards478

I have to agree that these numbers are shocking. Considering that the study was done in part by Global Knowledge (IT Training)...I look at the entire study and find that it is practically just a marketing ploy to get people to enroll in Training and get Certified.

CEdwards478
CEdwards478

The real issue here regarding salary's not matching up with what we see day-to-day *might* be the inability to properly classify your job-function based on a given list of jobs/job titles. I think this is especially prevalent in smaller organizations where IT staff wear many hats For example, those folks don't generally do enough Network Administration to consider themself a Network Admin by title...but there is definitely someone that holds that as one of their responsibilites.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

that about half of the data for this survey came directly from TechRepublic members.

shabanam
shabanam

Very Interesting, would this affect entry level positions too for Columbus, Ohio.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

There were some other surprises in the top 10, while several of the biggest cities in the U.S. were way down on the list: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=611 What do you think? Does this reflect what you're seeing?

SysAdminII
SysAdminII

Well, $70,000 on the west coast or east coast is pretty much poverty since the cost of living is about 5 times the amount it is in the midwest. But I still find some of those salaries are not accurate. I have known several people over the years and most of them are in the $50,000 range. I know the base salary for a CCNA is suppose to be around 80K and I am not seeing that here where I work.

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