Apple

Enterprise: 95 percent are choosing iPad over Android tablets

New Android tablets continue their onslaught into the market, but new data from Good Technology shows that the world's largest companies are shunning them for iPads.

The number of companies getting in line to challenge the iPad grows almost every week. And, while a few companies like RIM and HP are using their own OS to power their tablets, most of the iPad challengers are running Android. However, new data released by Good Technology shows that enterprise customers are choosing iPad over Android tablets by a huge percentage.

According to Good's four-month tally of recent mobile device activations for its large stable of enterprise customers, tablets are taking a growing chunk of the activation pie, but among those tablet adopters the Apple iPad is grabbing 95% of all activations, while very few Android tablets are showing up in large companies. In fact, iPad activations actually surpassed Android smartphone activations in the enterprise in recent months, according to the Good data. Take a look at the chart below.

Good Technology has been an enterprise mobile stalwart since the mid-2000s when it helped many companies securely deploy and manage Palm Treo smartphones. In recent years, Good has shifted its software toward iPhone and Android smartphone deployments. It can manage both types of devices, as well as most other mobile platforms, and it can manage both IT-deployed devices and customer-owned devices. Enterprises that want tight control over their mobile data rely on companies like Good to help bridge the gap between traditional IT best practices and modern consumer-driven mobile devices. Good's customers  include 182 of Fortune 500 companies and 49 of the Fortune 100. It's sometimes called "BlackBerry BES for the rest of us."

It's interesting to note that while Android continues to gain market share in the overall U.S. mobile market, it's actually been slipping a bit among U.S. enterprises in recent months, according to Good's data.

As for the tablet picture, John Herrema, Good's Senior VP of Corporate Strategy at Good Technology, said, "Roughly half of the iPads we activated in this quarter were for the financial sector." The chart below shows the breakdown of deployments across different industries.

Good also provided some additional commentary on the

In general, iPads are being deployed as a complementary "+one" device, not as an outright laptop or PC replacement. Key use cases for the iPad in Financial Services and Healthcare center on deployment as a laptop alternative, but not full-time replacement, for users who are heavy content consumers and/or presenters, but not heavy content creators. Examples of such users include executives, sales and client services staff, insurance agents and adjusters, and doctors. We are seeing proactive deployment in hospital settings as an outright replacement for "computers on wheels" and legacy tablet form factors. There is increasing interest among our customers with significant retail and/or field operations to use tablets for a variety of "in store" and field service applications. This includes not only customers from the Wholesale & Retail sector, but also customers in Financial Services, Communications, and Energy & Utilities that have significant retail and/or field service operations. Based on feedback from our customers, we're seeing a greater tendency for iPads to be purchased and deployed proactively on both a BYOD and company-owned basis. This contrasts with the overall deployment model for iPhones and Android smartphones, where BYOD is the more dominant approach overall.

I'll throw out one last chart from the Good data trove. It's the top 10 devices that are activated on Good's enterprise network.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the book, Follow the Geeks.

21 comments
adamfarkas
adamfarkas

While my organization leans Apple heavy as we are in the media space, I find that Android users have the choice to use Touchdown and avoid "Good", since Good isn't very good anyway.

cliff
cliff

I highly doubt the accuracy of that figure. I've lived long enough to know that statistics are as trustworthy as politicians. I do, however, suspect that Apple has the lion's share of the market. I also fully expect this to change soon. With products like the Toshiba Thrive that address issues like connectivity and expandability, we're liable to see some fence hoppers.

albayaaabc
albayaaabc

the fam of one marker on other is not shamed in my way to represent some trading system so let go forward for each brand name to successful and be used by whole plant .

daboochmeister
daboochmeister

If those companies are like ours, it's a lengthy process for the full lifecycle of planning, setting up a test env, testing out the devices, defining custom configuration needed as a result of the testing, etc. I doubt any companies even started thinking about testing them till the Samsung Galaxy Tab hit, if then. So it'll be some time ... Remember Disraeli - lies, damn lies, and statistics.

Komplex
Komplex

Apple used to be competitive in the Enterprise market, but when the upfront cost of the PC dropped dramatically, plus the shift of the buyer from users to centralized purchaser doomed Apple in the enterprise market. PC's became as generic as pens and pencils. The corporate market propped up the consumer market for RIM, HP and the android manufacturers, they never had to win over the consumer. Consumers looked at the offerings "It's the same as work..." made the difference. They never had to create a product where the user would say "I want to buy that." Non-Apple companies would put together a spec sheet and a price quote and send it to central purchasing. And for the first time in a generation, the PC/Phone/Tablet manufactures are competing with Apple on equal footing and they are getting beaten.

doug.montgomery
doug.montgomery

You cant use Good activations as a measure of all enterprise use. My company doesnt need Good for the android devices we have. Your loosing your credibility.

George Tirebiter
George Tirebiter

I wonder if the iPads are promoted and purchased more by enterprises due to Apple's strict regulation of its apps, as opposed to the open source ease of obtaining malware via some Android apps...?

Charles Bundy
Charles Bundy

Easier to use? I like the hardware features on the Android side but those Apple critters sure do polish the UI...

Don1958
Don1958

Isn't this data just a reflection of the market reality? iPads OWN the tablet market at this point. I would expect the numbers to even out in coming months or years as other tablet makers start chipping away at the gigantic lead Apple has carved out in this market. Our company uses Good and allows individuals to use it on either Android or iOS (iPhones and iPads). iPads are just now being allowed to connect to our email system so our numbers contribute a little to the overall trend. We have no Android tablets with Good installed and have had no requests for it so far. Again, I expect this to change as the Android tablets mature and gain market share.

katscoyote
katscoyote

Are these numbers being skewed by large purchases from a relatively small sample size? Exactly how many devices did Good activate over the time period in question? For how many different companies? According to my (admittedly very brief) research, as of April, 2011, comScore (http://www.comscore.com/Press_Events/Press_Releases/2011/6/comScore_Reports_April_2011_U.S._Mobile_Subscriber_Market_Share) and Gartner (http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1622614) both show a decisive advantage for Android over iOS in U.S. and wordwide market share. While it's my opinion that the Apple devices are a better fit for the majority of consumers, it just doesn't seem that the numbers being reported by Good Technology reflect what's happening on a larger scale. It makes me wonder if Good's services (I've had some experience with their products) are more beneficial for iOS devices than when compared with Android.

djones
djones

It has been my observation that CEO, CFO, Cxx types tend to act like crows swooping down to gather shiny objects when it comes to new technology. Regardless of how secure or how well or how bad something works, if some new technology gadget comes out, the alphabet crew goes out and buys it so they can bring in to work and show it off. For now Apple has convinced people that they have the coolest gadget. If it turned out tomorrow that suddenly Androids were the coolest, the whole alphabet group would go out and buy Androids.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Those are sectors I would have expected to have larger shares. Of course, it could be that those markets are closer to saturation.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

After all how many people still believe that to own a computer they must have Windows Installed or that Microsoft make Computers? People still insist on buying Windows no matter how unsuitable it is for their needs and most are not aware that there is any alternative. When modern Tablet Buyers talk do they misname all Tablet Devices as iPads? I know that many companies try very hard to get their products known by what people learn as a Name. Like Bic Ball Point Pens even though I have not seen a Bic Pen for several years everyone I speak to still calls Ball Point Pen's Bic's. ;) Col

msalvo
msalvo

Many of these tablets have only been out a few months. I would say that this report may be a little premature to compare tablets that are only a few months old with the iPad2. Time will tell...

timmers
timmers

I don't think that was ever stated in the article. Jason used figures like "Good???s customers include 182 of Fortune 500 companies and 49 of the Fortune 100" to illustrate the large reach of these stats. No where did he say "all enterprise" or 100% of any one group. "You're losing" your fight with grammar and logic.

Charles Bundy
Charles Bundy

But from the admin management side it seems like the Android crew have more options wrt security controls.

spdragoo
spdragoo

What we have are the *percentages* comparing iPad to non-iPad sales. What we're missing are: -- actual number of items sold in each category; and -- number of tablets purchased for enterprise use vs. non-tablets purchased for enterprise use for the same periods. The first one would tell us if we have a statistically large enough sample to even start making short- to mid-term forecasts on tablet sales, or if (more likely) it's just "too early to tell". The second one would tell us whether tablet purchases for enterprise use have a statistically large enough sample to say that they're becoming important for enterprise users, or if they're still in the "limited/narrow-scale application for enterprise users, or possibly just expensive CEO toys". Otherwise, it ends up sounding like, "Of the 1% of customers that bought the latest/greatest/bleeding-edge new tech toy, 95% of them bought the set from the manufacturer that's been a) out the longest, and b) has the best-known brand name"... which to me would mean squat, since I would fall into the 99% category of "could care less about the new bleeding-edge tech toy".

Dknopp
Dknopp

I am logged into numerous Unix/Linux boxes at any particular time, working code on a large upside down monitor, doing spreadsheets with metric data on my wide screen. I am not sure where a pad would fit in that environment. When I went shopping for another apple ( personal )I was all set to get the Ipad, but opted for a macbook air instead, just seemed to be more useful, even though I already have an apple 17 Macbook (G4, getting old now, use it to stream my music and store my picts now ). If I was a office laptop fixit guy, I think it would come in handy going to diff cubes to work on things. When I was flying all over the place, doing server performance work in diff corporations, I probably would not have taken a pad either, had to have my laptop and would not want to have to carry another device - never pack past a computer bag and a carry-on.

PhaedrusFPI
PhaedrusFPI

More security options on the android could explain the higher use of Good on IOS versus Android. Good provides a self contained security package for accessing Enterprise data securely.

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