Browser

Firefox could leapfrog Chrome with new OS-like interface

Firefox has been losing momentum to Google Chrome in 2010, but a new innovation called Tab Candy could give Firefox a big leap forward.

During 2010, Firefox has had much of its momentum as an alternative Web browser stolen by Google Chrome. However, a new Firefox innovation called Tab Candy will make Firefox act more like a operating system, with much-improved multitasking and sharing capabilities. In fact, if the Firefox team can pull off all of the features of Tab Candy that it recently demonstrated, it would leapfrog Chrome in functionality.

The Tab Candy functionality is being spearheaded by Aza Raskin, the Head of UX at Mozilla Labs. Raskin is the son of Macintosh creator Jef Raskin and he joined Mozilla in 2008 when his software company Humanized merged with Mozilla.

Raskin said, "How many of us keep tabs open as reminders of something we want to do or read later? We're all suffering from infoguilt. We need a way to organize browsing, to see all of our tabs at once, and focus on the task at hand."

With that mind, here's what Tab Candy can do:

  • Organize tabs into groups that you can name and position on a desktop-like view (Figure A)
  • Save tab groups to look at later
  • Search through your tabs
  • Have multiple profiles so that you can sign into the same site with different logins in two different tab groups
  • Share tabs or tab groups between different computers and devices (Figure D)
  • Share tabs or tab groups with other users
  • Set up a shared tab group where several users can co-browse and see what each other is looking at on the screen
  • Choose colors or image backgrounds to distinguish different tab groups (Figure C)

Screenshots

Figure A: Basic Tab Candy interface

Figure B: Tab Candy can handle lots of tab groups

Figure C: To distinguish between different tab group you can give them a color or background

Figure D: Tab Candy will also let you share tabs across different computers and devices

Video demo

Here is Raskin's seven-minute demo of Tab Candy:

Sanity check

Raskin has perfectly articulated the workflow and tab overload problem in today's Web browsers, and his Tab Candy vision of innovating the browser experience would be a major step forward. And, Firefox needs a big shot in the arm. Not only is Google Chrome leaching away more and more Firefox users, it has also stolen away Firefox's reputation as the browser bringing the most innovation to the Web experience.

My only question with Tab Candy is if and when it will make it into Firefox. In the lackluster announcement of Firefox 4 in May, the Firefox team had Tab Candy listed in light gray at the bottom of its list of new features (giving no indication of its importance). Raskin said "The reason why Tab Candy was listed in grey in the product plan is that there are still some implementation challenges to be solved and a couple user experience questions to be answered for us to be able to commit to TabCandy being in Firefox 4."

Part of the challenge may be that Tab Candy is being developed entirely in HTML, Javascript, and CSS, and what they are trying to accomplish is extremely ambitious. The other part may be that the Mozilla leadership hasn't honed in on how big of a deal Tab Candy would be for users.

Make no mistake, this is Firefox's best shot at competing with Chrome since the rest of Firefox 4 feels much like a copy of Chrome. Launching Firefox 4 with Tab Candy should be Mozilla's top priority.

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About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

86 comments
wlportwashington
wlportwashington

But will it stop Firefox from locking up and crashing? I've seen FF lockup on several systems over the past 8 months. Before it was great now....

alfielee
alfielee

I don't always agree with you Jason but with this tab organiser I think you've really hit the mark. As long as Firefox can get their speed up & not be slowed down by all the add-ons & features I think this is one of the best upgrades ever provided by FF. I love FF but hardly use it now bcoz it is so slow. Chrome is as boring as batshit & lacks the add-ons so I use Flock bcoz it has Chrome's engine that is fast but availability of many of FF's add-ons. I'll go back to FF as soon as this becomes available as long as it doesn't cause a downgrade in speed.

alfielee
alfielee

I don't like Chrome. It is truly boring. The fact that it flies makes it worthwhile with Google sites. As far as Firefox is concerned it becomes incredibly bloated & slows down when too many tabs are open. If this could be fixed I'd go back to Firefox in an instant because of the Add-ons make Firefox a much better experience. I use Flock because it is a cross-over having a lot of Firefox's attitudes with Chrome's engine speed. It is still a hack at present & not quite there but the mix works better than current Chrome & almost Firefox. Many of Firefox's Add-ons work with Flock, ones that I can't use on Chrome that reduce my key-strokes on usernames & passwords especially.

wanharris
wanharris

I do hope Firefox fixed those plugin problems such as Quicktime. I am sure there are plenty others. I am starting to like Google Chrome already. It's good to have comparison of both on 2 different notebooks. I am sure Mozilla do not want to lose their die hard fans!

simmon77
simmon77

Tab Candy reminds me of Raskin.app for Mac where you can organize your files in a similar way plus having an overview by zooming in and out: http://raskinformac.com/

jfuller05
jfuller05

OK, it looks cool and I would probably use Tab Candy. However, I can't help thinking that "Bookmarks" or "Favorites" already does this for me. I have my favorite sites/pages in groups just like this will do. The only difference is that Tab Candy organizes with graphics whereas Bookmarks organizes with text.

wjvelasquez
wjvelasquez

imitation of google and IE8. Firefox use almost the whole free memory in the PC. Firefox will never be the number one

Ocie3
Ocie3

Obviously, it is a "full featured" tab manager. Currently, I use the Tab Mix Plus (tabs) and MR Tech Toolkit (menus) add-ons for Firefox 3.6.8. But Tab Candy has some truly interesting features that could prove useful when I'm working on a project, especially for research. While watching the video, I kept thinking that it does many things that I do now by creating and organizing bookmarks, although Tab Candy could be much faster. As someone else mentioned, though, hopefully it won't try to fetch the web page for each and every tab that is "open" during start-up.

harrylal
harrylal

Chrome is faster, but I think their link management needs work. I use it for the speed which is way faster than Firefox but I like FF's interface a lot more. When you open a new tab in Chrome there are the recently visited links, which is convenient, but if you want to get rid of a recent link you only visited once, it cannot be done, and I don't like it because I lose another recent link that I wanted to keep. This makes the appeal of that feature less appealing. The tab candy seems to address that for me. I really would like for FF to fix the speed on open issue.

HAL_9000
HAL_9000

IE8 and Chrome are equally bad at having web page display problems. The day Chrome can handle wcms systems like Joomla that is the day I might consider it. But FireFox is my browser that handles all webpages. And yes Tab candy sounds good to my usage pattern.

kanati8869
kanati8869

Looks good. I like the idea. Now if they could just get firefox itself to not be bloated, crash, have the slowest javascript engine out there... All would be well with the world.

Justin James
Justin James

Tab Candy sounds OK. It would be much more useful if Firefox's tabs weren't so lousy to begin with. IE and Chrome both handle tabs MUCH better than Firefox. IE automatically groups tabs by color based on where they spawned from, which is very useful when researching multiple things at once or when different tabs relate to different projects. Both Chrome and IE return you to a tab that makes sense when you close a tab, Firefox puts you in some stupid location that makes no sense. I've been trying to force myself to switch from IE to Firefox for nearly a month now, and I hate it. I'd go to Chrome, but I can't stand the tabs taking over the title bar. J.Ja

dazzlin_dazz
dazzlin_dazz

Google Chrome runs in its own sand box, making it much harder for viruses and other nasties to get from a hacked or other dubious webpage onto your PC. I don?t know all the details of FF4, but for me I would rather have the better security and piece of mind I get with Chrome (once I have put the home button back where it should be). Although, to be fair, I am interested in trying this out for myself. When researching things, I often end up with lots of tabs open, some of which take me of on an interesting tangent I want to follow later.

willy_uk
willy_uk

This looks fantastic. I'm guilty of having a huge number of tabs, I had an absolutely savage pruning session recently and, through bookmarking a fair few before closing and simply closing many more, I managed to cut it down to about 50 tabs. Right now I'm up to 70 after clicking a load of links which I'm working my way through at the moment. Tab Candy feature looks like exactly what I've been wishing I had. The difference between "looks great" and "is great" will be in the details though. * I can close a group with one click? Fantastic - great feature. Can I get them back just as easily if a stray click closes a group I intended to keep? * Will the tabs and groups be saved between restarts of the browser or system? I currently use TabMixPlus to take care of that. It would be a shame to lose that. * When I have the inevitable huge number of open tabs split down into smaller groups, will they all load up at once when starting the browser (long... long... looonnnggg... browser start up times when you've got a lot of tabs on the go) or will they only be loaded when I switch to the group for the first time? The above are the main "details" that spring to mind. I'm unlikely to switch to Chrome, but this looks like it will make FireFox even more solidly my browser of choice. I look forwards to having a play.

JMF667
JMF667

The worst feature of Firefox to date is how it handles memory, uses tons of RAM - not all of us have unlimited resources - and is slow to release it when closing down or restarting. Maybe I have too many extensions, but that is the best feature of Firefox.

lucasm007
lucasm007

This CANDY look like Safari TOP SITE setup. Not impressed. I use Safari and Firefox but more Safari. I find Chrome has a lot to be desired for.

coffeeenema
coffeeenema

If they can put it in FF4, I'll definitely start playing with it. I usually have 30 or more tabs open at a time, 2/3 of that being "infoguilt". I'd love to be able to organize it visually (i.e., as opposed to bookmark trees).

pgit
pgit

I say forget ff 4 and push this out the door asap! That is exactly what I need. Imagine the streamlining of bookmarks this will enable. Mind boggling, I can't wait to get my hands on this one.

ahmed.ayyash
ahmed.ayyash

personally speaking Chrome is my browser of choice mainly because of the extreme none-cloggy ui mixed with great performance ... more crash-prone features is the least already snailish firefox needs

martin.77084
martin.77084

If all that crap is kept as an option that I can avoid, OK; otherwise, it will likely drive me to IE.

madman652001
madman652001

it shows great promise if it shows it has speed too

ankurratnam
ankurratnam

A wonderful inovation..but it should not crash in between of browsing

bfpower
bfpower

My main concern with a browser is speed. FF 3 lags on startup, so it's a distinct possibility it will still lag (or lag even more) with the new features. Unless they can beat Chrome's performance, they're not an option.

codybwheeler
codybwheeler

I sort of do this already with Chrome - although I use folders and multiple windows. Tab Candy looks like it would make things a lot easier, especially with all of the other features it adds. Integrity HR

GamerDad
GamerDad

Tab Candy seems like a nice idea, but unless some major stability issues are fixed, I don't see myself using it anywhere in the near future

Ocie3
Ocie3

it seems likely to me that it will be easier to re-organize tabs with Tab Candy than it is to re-organize bookmarks. From time-to-time the bookmarks require "maintenance" of some sort or another (pun intended), and doing it with the current Firefox tools is slow and sometimes confusing. Only too well do I know what Mr. Raskin means by "info-guilt" -- wanting to learn more about almost everything as much as possible but not being able to do that. Although, I recognize it as "info glut" most of the time.

willy_uk
willy_uk

If it does try to load every tab it will be a deal breaker. There's no way this will be usable by those who have tabs open from one session to the next if they have to sit and wait for all the tabs to load at startup. That is, of course, assuming tabs can be carried to the next session as part of Tab Candy.

Ocie3
Ocie3

"Speed on open" issues often do not originate with a particular program, such as Firefox or Chrome, but are fundamentally caused by too many programs being loaded as services and others then loaded as "resident" after all of the services are loaded. They take memory and some CPU cycles, so the programs that you [i]really want to run today[/i] just have whatever resources remain.

Ocie3
Ocie3

[i]"Both Chrome and IE return you to a tab that makes sense when you close a tab, Firefox puts you in some stupid location that makes no sense."[/i] Obviously, Tab Candy is a tab manager. Currently, I use Tab Mix Plus (tabs) and MR Tech Toolkit (menus). But Tab Candy has some truly interesting features that could prove useful when I'm working on a project.

willy_uk
willy_uk

When you close a tab, FF either returns you to the previously viewed tab or the next tab along the line. It just depends on when (and where) the closed tab was spawned. Very straightforwards and intuitive in use, I think. I'm not all that keen on IE's handling of tabs at all. If you're the sort who remembers where a tab is, having tabs spawning either side of it every time you do something just screws things up. I would like a "best of both worlds" approach though. Having a default way of handling it, switchable with a setting or on-the-fly by having a right click menu item. "Open/Open in foreground tab/Open in new tab/Open in new tab after this tab". FF's default setting of warning before acting when a stray click hits "Close Other Tabs" is far preferable to IE's instant dumping of everything you had open is much better too.

tbostwick
tbostwick

And Chrome's "sandbox" still isn't as powerful as Sandboxie - which the entire toolset that a sanbox provides - only 1% of browser users even know what that is. With some of the firefox addons that have long since been avail (AdBlock, NoScript, NoFlash, etc..) security isn't an issue - and actually, Firefox does a FAR better job at handinling certs than any other browser, which is far more important, particularly from a business sense - and the settings are easy to get to, as well are the logs and history. Where do you look in Chrome for this? Well, if you don't know the "shortcut" to get to it - you can't!

willy_uk
willy_uk

The thing that needs sorting more than anything is use of resources. After that, bring on the Tab Candy!

sparker
sparker

I can and do keep many tab groups open simultaneously. IE gives me an adequate browser with tabs and tab groups, Windows lets me open and organise several IE sessions. With task bar groups I can navigate to them easily. My other computer is a Palm Pre, and it also has a good multitasking operating system.

Ocie3
Ocie3

while running Chrome and Firefox, there was not very much difference in "startup speed". I ran both in the same Sandboxie sandbox, but Firefox had about 30 add-ons, and Chrome had only two or three "plug-ins". I was surprised that the Firefox add-ons did not make a much more significant difference, which leads me to wonder what the performance of Chrome will be like when users begin adding plug-ins to it as they tend to do with Firefox. It is quite possible to reduce Firefox to its "bare bones", and it will then resemble Google Chrome with respect to its features and functionality, and most definitely with respect to its "speed", not only on startup but in surfing websites, too. However, I wouldn't advise doing that without using the Firefox NoScript add-on, which is not available for Chrome. Some would say that it is not necessary for Chrome, but I have some doubts about that. By the way, Opera is faster than Chrome. ;-)

alan.schuh
alan.schuh

If I wanted candy I would use M$ Office $uite. With each release FireFox is getting slower and gooier, and if they do not focus on the lack of speed issue, they will lose many of their early adopters and new users will try it a few times, shrug their shoulders, and move on to (or back to) Chrome.

marvin.novello
marvin.novello

In my opinions this kinda thing is exactly why FireFox has missed the opportunity to get fully mainstream. What a "normal" person wants is something that browses the web. They don't want configurability / add-ons / skins / plug-ins. That's the kinda thing that Geeks want. Nothing wrong with that - geeks are people too! However, it will never overtake IE if this is an indication of where it is going. Mainstream users (your mom) don't need this and they never will.

jfuller05
jfuller05

Yeah, I know exactly what you mean. I have a bookmark with a lot of links to things that I want to read, but don't ever get around to reading. Add to that, many podcasts that I download and never get around to listening to as much as I would like. I do listen to at least one a day, but there are many I would like to listen to. I haven't had any trouble with bookmarks (yet!) that I use in Opera. I'm sure there has been trouble with IE's favorites system, but I haven't encountered any with Opera's bookmarks.

Justin James
Justin James

Tab Mix is able to fix some of the tab problems in Firefox, but it still doesn't give me a close algorithm that suits my preferences (IE's is perfect for me) or the color grouping. It's not a matter of "getting used to it", I've been trying to force myself to like it for a month. It took me a few minutes to feel comfortable with Chrome's tabs, despite being slightly different from IE's. Firefox just needs to spend a little bit of effort tweaking this or making it more configurable. J.Ja

dazzlin_dazz
dazzlin_dazz

Google does sandbox out of the box. You don't have to down load an extra or turn it on, and it's free. Sandboxie is cheep, but you do have to pay (albeit just once for a personal license, regardless of computers you own). Better security? Probably. But it is an add on and we are talking about just what the browser can do.

alfielee
alfielee

I agree perhaps that we might understand it better but even for my partner this is a revolution. To explain it to her, she'd never get it but to show it to her & how to use it & she'll be using it all the time. Her business has suffered because of the lack of a tool like this & it really is a tool. Delineation by groups, social, business, hobby & more specialised groups within groups make this a fantastic tool. You are severely underestimating people. The fact that they don't get it immediately as distinct from yourself being a geek just shows that they don't understand it. Describe to them how it can make their browsing life more organised & perhaps show them & most people will see the benefit. Tab control offers everyone a way of re-visiting stuff that was interesting that I couldn't check now but want to get back to later on without keeping every single tab open which slows down Firefox considerably. It also allows the user to use the browser in distinct ways; ie browsing generally, bill management, business management, new ideas, hobbies, family stuff, personal stuff just as an example. Having distinct groupings is an obvious one for me but I get it & I read tech-stuff. Mere mortals who have no tech interest at all, like my partner, will still get the brilliance of this with not much explanation, just a little help.

ProfDarth
ProfDarth

I think this ff feature will be extremely valuable e.g. For business users - love it

Justin James
Justin James

And you've just hit the reality of the double rainbow dream world of open source! The fact is, there are TONS of open source projects with deep rooted technical problems, even those with millions of users. WordPress, MySQL, and PHP all immediately come to mind. IE8's tab grouping/coloring is a built in feature that doesn't require any kind of plugin, ActiveX, etc. J.Ja

Ocie3
Ocie3

Sorry to hear that Firefox has been such a problem for you to use! If Firefox is "open source" as I believe it is, and it is as bad as you aver it is [i]"at the deep technical level",[/i] then one of the major benefits touted for "open source" software is not operative for Firefox. Personally, I used Netscape as my first browser and continued with it until Netscape transferred all rights to what became the Mozilla Foundation. Then I used Firefox 1.0, and have used each successive version consistently ever since. For a while I also used an early version of Opera. Unfortunately, I found too many bugs and the developer's command of English was insufficient to understand what I was reporting, let alone to resolve the issues. Of course, I've always kept apprised of I.E. from the beginning, and it was a real disappointment that people would rather use its bare-bones functionality than pay for the superior features of Netscape. IE8 is the first version for which I've had much respect, but, as I've described, it just doesn't work for me most of the time. I ran it yesterday some time after posting my remarks about it, and for the very first time, IE8 displayed my choice for the "home page" on the first tab, instead of Microsoft's choice. And I have no idea why it did that, because every attempt to use IE8 features that are supposed to enable me to do that have failed repeatedly. I have not tested IE8 since the most recent patch, so I don't know whether the security flaw that I found has been remedied. For IE8, is tab grouping and coloring a fundamental feature, or do you have to run an ActiveX control that you obtain from wherever??

Justin James
Justin James

I've looked for a proper tab coloring system, using that exact search. No dice. Just a lot of things which do stuff involving coloring, but not coloring by a group determined by which tab spawned what tab (the way IE does is, which works very well as an organizational tool). Look. You can't convince me. I've given Firefox a month of my life, and it has done nothing but made me miserable, primarily around its handling of tabs (the fact that it can't handle Flash or JavaScript that's out of control, while both IE and Chrome do that fine is part of it too). The only reason I was using Firefox instead of Chrome is because Chrome covers the title bar with the tab controls and they are active which the Chrome window is not, making clicking on the Chrome title bar a dangerous affair (it's my preferred way of switching windows on my dual monitor setup). When I tried Chrome it took less than a few minutes to feel at home, despite my initial skepticism and general dislike of Google as a company. I approached Firefox with open arms and all it did was kick me in the head for a month. Heck, it took a dozen tries just to get it to import my bookmarks from IE. Firefox consistently mis-handled sites that I use on a regular basis. Neither Chrome nor IE have that problem. Firefox simply didn't meet my needs and based on the development goals, it never will. Their focus is 1) copying Chrome 2) adding bling 3) convincing everyone that the underlying technical issues are addressed (memory leaks, crashing, etc.) when they really aren't. If it meets your needs, cool. But for me, IE 8 met my needs much better, and the only advantages Firefox gives me *for my needs* (not yours, not your best buddy, not my mother, not some Internet talking head). Did I find things to like about Firefox? Yes, I did. There is a reason why I gave it a full month of my life, which is more of a chance than I've ever given another app that I felt uncomfortable about. I liked the speed (a bit faster than IE), the security story is a bit better (not perfect, but better than IE), and I liked the spell check. Chrome happens to have all of these advantages over IE as well (although the security of Chrome is a bit doubtful). But it kicks me in the teeth a lot less often than Firefox does. So despite Chrome having one really huge flaw in it (the title bar), and one minor flaw (no "Send to OneNote" functionality), it is significantly better *for my needs* than Firefox. And Firefox remains a really bad application at the deep technical level, and anyone who evaluates it honestly will concur. J.Ja

Ocie3
Ocie3

If you're running Firefox, use Tools > Addons > Get Addons and put "color tabs" in the search text box (second line, upper lefthand corner) and press Enter. When I did that it returned 25 results. The first one was Group/Tab, and there are at least four more which deal specifically with assigning colors to tabs. Many others enable users to do such things as Tile Tabs, etc. Most of the add-ons that I use are related to security ([i]e.g.,[/i] SSL Blacklist), but some are for additional functionality, such as creating images of the page that is currently displayed by the browser.

santeewelding
santeewelding

For an old man, you make so much work for yourself. Do you do this so that you know you still can?

Ocie3
Ocie3

if only because making use of what are supposed to be its features is like pulling teeth (maybe without any anesthetic, too). First of all, I.E. 8 does not have very many features to use. So if someone is satisfied with a minimal web browser (millions continued to use I.E. 6 for 10 years and some still do), IE8 could be the one for them, but eventually they might discover Google Chrome -- then I.E. will be abandoned. Second, I have yet to open more than two tabs in IE8. It starts with the first one open to Microsoft's choice of "start page" until I switch it to my chosen "home page". Of course, I've specified that page as my home page "permanently", but IE8 evidently doesn't acknowledge the setting. But if I then want IE8 to fetch a web page from a different web site, IE8 automagically displays the page in the same tab. So I must access the second tab first in order to display the page from the other site. But when I do that, again IE8 fetches a page of Microsoft's choice from some web site and won't relinquish control of the browser until that page is fully loaded. Then I can put the cursor at the end of the URL in the location field and use the Backspace key to delete it, then enter the entire URL for the web site that I want (it can be chose from the Favorites list) and use the Enter key or whatever to command IE8 to fetch a page from that site. However, since IE8 does not add another blank tab behind the second one, there is no way that I have ever found to open a third tab. I can just imagine how relevant that grouping by color would be to a guy who cannot see green (the default?). I have no idea of what Microsoft's I.E. engineers' concepts of "grouping" might be, and I'm not sure that I want to find out. You probably don't realize it, but every time I launch IE8 it "welcomes" me and wants to run the setup routine. Experiments have shown that IE8 will do that every time that it launches and discovers that it is not the default browser. Why would that be so? And while we're on the subject of Microsoft's thinking, why do they believe that every page which I want to bookmark must be one of my "favorites"?

willy_uk
willy_uk

...but I can't fault anything you've said there. Absolutely it is an issue of the way an individual user prefers their tabs to work and customisation being one of FireFox's good points it is a bit strange that it can't be configured to work exactly like you, I or anyone else wants. I know it's not an "out of the box" answer, but I'm pretty sure there's an add-on for colour grouping of tabs. It doesn't solve the "what happens when the tabs close bit" but would bring it a little bit closer to the setup you like. That's unless I've completely made up an add-on that doesn't exist. I don't exactly spend much time checking out what's available so sorry if I did.

Ocie3
Ocie3

I.E.8 had multi-process architecture before Google Chrome was released. Multi-process architecture is essential to how Chrome "sandboxes" each of the child processes. If we compare Chrome's process separation and lock-down to the traditional sandbox, such as the ones created by Sandboxie, then the Chrome processes clearly resemble [i]prison cells[/i] or [i]straightjackets[/i] rather than [i]sandboxes[/i]. The differences have various implications with respect to what a Chrome process can do, and, so far, the user does not have a voice in Chrome's policies and procedures. What it boils down to is that Chrome cannot stop a malware process from doing something without also stopping a licit process from doing the same thing, unless user input is permitted. Then it becomes a matter of whether the user's discernment is faulty with regard to what a specific, currently-running process should be permitted to do. As to Firefox, Mozilla seems to be trending toward a multi-process architecture, too, whether they eventually choose to implement some sort of "sandboxing" as well. Already Firefox 3.6 runs plug-ins such as Adobe Reader and Flash Player in a separate child process.

dazzlin_dazz
dazzlin_dazz

It's a seperate program then, but still not part of Firefox. My point is that Google Chrome does this straight out of the box, no add-ons and no seperate programs. It just does. Firefox and IE do not.

Ocie3
Ocie3

It is an independent computer program which creates one or more sandboxes in which you can tell it to run one or more programs. I run every program that accesses the Internet in a Sandboxie sandbox (Firefox, Thunderbird, I.E. and iPodder), unless the program is being updated. So we can't run Microsoft Update (I.E.) in a sandbox, either. Sometimes I install an unfamiliar program in a sandbox to see what it does, and to examine its features, before I install in into the actual computer system.

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