Hardware investigate

Five technology trends to watch in 2010

Here is my countdown of the five technology trends that should be on your radar for 2010. From consumerization to WAN acceleration, don't lose track of these trends.

You can watch this as a video or read it as an article below the video window.

Technology innovation continued its ruthless pace in 2009, despite the economic headwinds. Now it's time to turn our sights on 2010, where there are going to be some really interesting things to keep an eye on. Let's count down the five tech trends that should be on your radar for 2010.

5: The consumerization of IT

This is something we've been talking about for a couple years but the trend is accelerating. We see it in employees using their own personal laptops and devices for work tasks and using freely available Web tools to help them get their jobs done. This can create a whole host of problems for IT, but in most cases you don't want to squash it altogether. What you'll need is a policy that gives employees guidance on how and when these types of tools can and can't be used, and why.

4: Desktop virtualization

TechRepublic recently asked its CIO Jury about desktop virtualization and 75% said they weren't interested. However, the 25% that ARE interested are very enthusiastic about using it to cut costs and simplify IT support. In 2010, it's going to interesting to see if this trend gains momentum and becomes more mainstream, or if it's simply relegated to a few niche scenarios and industries.

3: E-readers

While most of the buzz around e-readers is centered around consumers readings books and newspapers, there are also a new set of e-readers that will hit the market in 2010 that are aimed at helping businesses streamline the meetings that require huge stacks of paper and bring more multimedia capabilities to business documents. For more ammunition on why you should follow this trend, see Jack Wallen's article "10 reasons why e-readers make sense in the enterprise."

2: WAN acceleration

I consider WAN acceleration to be one of the best kept secrets in the IT and business worlds. By caching big files and often-used documents, WAN acceleration appliances and software can save big money on bandwidth costs and give your branch offices and remote workers far better performance on their business applications. Companies like Riverbed are even taking WAN acceleration a step further and using it to help speed up hosted cloud applications by partnering with major SaaS providers. All of this makes WAN acceleration one of the hottest projects in IT right now, because it can offer fast ROI and immediate productivity benefits.

1: Berries, apples, and robots

What do these three things have in common? Well, of course, we're talking about smartphones with BlackBerry, Apple iPhone, and Google Android. These are the three smartphone platforms that have the most momentum heading into 2010. With smartphones becoming standard tools for more and more business workers, it's going to be important to watch which devices users gravitate toward, which platforms offer IT more security and manageability features, and which ones developers latch on to as the best place to build new applications for business users.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

64 comments
JNStarwood
JNStarwood

These five trends share an essential objective: get the right information into the right hands wherever they are and whatever they're using to the make business decisions - - and do it faster! These trends imply a shift from focusing on the details of the IT hardware and software to focusing on enabling business capabilities and decision-making. It is imperative that professionals working in IT conduct themselves as business professionals who know and apply IT rather than IT professionals who are at best trying to understand the business and at worst are at odd with the business. __Joseph Starwood (www.linkedin.com/in/starwood)

203T
203T

Personally I think once it's value is proven as a cost savings tool it'll take off. Opportunity for desktop management ROI is huge

chas_2
chas_2

Interesting that your "berries, apples and robots" didn't include "windows". :-) Are you saying Windows Mobile - now Windows Phone - is moribund?

Too-Tired Techie
Too-Tired Techie

That sounds like something to read, but could not locate it through normal searches on TechNet. Jason, could you give us a link? Thanks.

rowdydave
rowdydave

Windows Mobile isn't that bad, is it?

agedtea
agedtea

The biggest seller for the masses in 2010 will be SSD's.(Solid State Drives) Once they come down in price, (will happen in 2010) sales will be on fire.

reisen55
reisen55

True that the IPhone and Blackberry are changing mobile work habits, as to a lesser degree the Netbook. All of these are adjuncts at present to a proper office and local area network construct for the employee. Employees using their own hardware for office work open up a plethora of horrific malware and security compromises that I shudder to even think about. 15 years ago it was a bad thing to install software from Your Uncle Ed and so it remains true today. Linux is out there in the server world strong, not on the desktop. Windows is out there strong in server and desktop, no sign of direct toppling yet. YET. Microsoft almost blew it with Vista. Novell is history save for legacy installs which are not getting rid of it. Plus: no virus or malware for Netware servers. Gee, nobody talks about that. Outsourcing to India remains the mania of the day, with disasterous results and consequences for American IT as a career path. Horrible.

m@rcel
m@rcel

uTP is a new and improved implementation of the BitTorrent protocol which is designed to be network friendly.

jos
jos

10% less use of buildings: Employees using their own personal laptops and devices for work tasks plus Web tools to help them get their jobs done. 10% less use of buildings: E-readers can help businesses streamline the huge stacks of paper and bring more multimedia capabilities to business documents. 10% less use of buildings: Cloud-WAN acceleration appliances and software can save an own LAN network. What do you think?

richard
richard

Consumerization of IT ... interesting. Reminds me of the 1980s. IT departments (or data centers as they were usually known) were focused on mainframes and minis. Desktop PCs (or micros as they were often called then) allowed tech-savvy non-IT employees to have hitherto unknown access to, and control over, personal processing power. I saw this in government and financial institutions for number crunching and written presentation. The calculator and typewriter (typing pool) were suddenly replaced by powerful tools (albeit with "primitive" software). IT Departments suddenly lost control over a chunk of what they perceived as their "territory" even though they were unable to adapt and provide the services users were demanding. Not sure I have anything terribly smart to say, but the lesson seems to be "try to stay current with rapidly changing technology AND evolving user requirements ... including requirements that might not exist until there is technology there to create them"

wael_jabari
wael_jabari

Really his voice and the way he is introducing makes u get nervous while listening to this episode. I was not able to think about anyting else because of that. Sorry Jason Hiner,

bedswerver
bedswerver

I work as the IT manager for a small-ish construction consultancy in the UK and we have been using Riverbed units for nearly three years now - I have yet to speak to anyone who hasn't incorporated these into their WAN infrastructure in some capacity. As far as this is concerned, I think for a large number of companies WAN acceleration was a trend in 2008, not 2010. My counter would be "Interface." If the world economy picks up over 2010 as it is expected then I believe that "the one to watch" will be interfaces - touch screen and more manual manipulation of screen entities. Nay-sayers will respond with "What about fingermarks on the screen?" but this could lead to 2010 being the year of screen cleaners actually being used, for a change. I think that touchscreen technology (all vendors have a proposition for this) will open avenues of manipulation of on-screen entities which we have never dreamt of before now.

tranzophobia
tranzophobia

WAN acceleration is only part of the story with WAN optimisation being the really interesting area. From where I'm sitting the big things that we are aiming for this year (apart from VDI - still not decided yet) is commodity computing and storage. Areas such as thin provisioning etc... are now being picked up by the big players as they reach a level of maturity and we are expecting to see some major savings this year. Same for commodity computing although it will take a bit longer for us to measure the benefits. At the moment I can't see how touch screen technology can show any benefit to an organisation.

adumbleton
adumbleton

I agree; I can see more people dipping their toes into the VDI pool, especially if they are offered reasonably priced and secure 'Desktop in the cloud' type services to try before they buy. Also to watch this year will be take-up of what I see as Desktop Virtualization v2.0; basically the advent of the type-1 client hypervisor (e.g. Citrix Xenclient and VMWare CVP (Client Virtualisation Platform). These are the fully offline capable (and centrally synchronised) virtual desktops that should offer abstraction from the hardware refresh pains and management complications of 'use your own pc' concepts. This is an area worth watching in 2010 I think.

appdev
appdev

Microsofts market share with it's mobile OS would certainly seem to warrant it's inclusion.It's also used by a much wider variety of cellular service providers and phone manufacturers than some others on your list!! Why the exclusion??

dirk.collins
dirk.collins

E-Readers are a non-starter until such time as they are constructed to actually retain any information that is purchased and stored in them. I'm looking at you Kindle. Desktop Virtualization? Good concept, however anyone really interested in keeping information secure won't be storing such information on any virtual desktop until such time as said desktop can be guaranteed to be available 24/7 and also secure. That's what's currently holding me back from recommending cloud computing resources such as a VD, and other online documentation and archival systems to business clients and other non-IT people.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I'm guessing more like 2012 or '13 before SSDs reach prices per gigabyte that consumers will be willing to pay.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

2010 is the year IT operations become like auto repair and maintenance, crappy pay to boot and programming becomes like manufacturing: Either dead or dying. 2010 is the year university CS programs focus more on business analysis than programming.

tracy.walters
tracy.walters

Employee use of personal computers - No way am I going to let employees use their personal machines for accessing work systems. Those machines have every kind of malware infestation possible, as we've seen when they bring them to work and try to plug them into our systems. Ain't gonna happen until some major changes take place and malware threats are reduced. E-Readers The promise of more eDocs and less paper has been with us for a long time. My company goes to great length to be 'paperless' but it's not, and won't be until a couple of the current generations in place retire. They're just too bound to the paper...they want to hold it in their hands and read it. I give it at least another 20 years. BTW, I'm a big fan of eReaders, and am on my 4th (2nd generation Kindle), having used them for nearly 10 years. WAN Acceleration appliances/Cloud computing - Maybe, just maybe...but I'm not sold on Cloud computing yet. I do not want my company's information hosted on servers belonging to someone else. If we haven't got our critical information in our own hands, then we do not know who has access to it. This is problem not just because of corporate espionage or snoopers, but because of serious financial liability. I hope this will all change though.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Your first point is valid, but there's nothing new about it. People have been shifting to remote access for years. The problem with web tools remain the security of corporate data. Regarding your second point, I don't see businesses investing in closed network e-readers over more capable laptops or netbooks. Without a standard file format, I wouldn't touch an e-reader except for a limited class of mobile users, and they aren't taking up desk space anyway. I don't think LAN hardware takes up much space for most companies. If you have racks and racks of routers, sure. Otherwise you're not saving much space by eliminating them. But I wouldn't invest in commercial real estate right now regardless, without first looking at occupancy rates for the area I was interested in.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

You're welcome to read the full text of the video in the text below the video window. Some prefer text to video or audio. Of course, TechRepublic also has other readers that are more visual or auditory learners. That's why we offer both.

nezarian
nezarian

You do have a point, Wael. I keep noticing that editors of Tech Republic, like Jason and Bill, are too theatric in their talking style and body language, which is both nagging and distracting. While one would often love the content, he can't but hate how it is presented.

Mohammad Oweis
Mohammad Oweis

I work as IS System Engineer in the world leader company in building material Lafarge (Cement, Concrete, aggregate, and gypsum). We have standardized WAN acceleration on Riverbed at group level (80 country), since last year. Most of countries and Data Centers will deploy Riverbed during 2010, and thus we will have better performance and lower our bandwidth cost :)

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Touch screen is excellent technology for use in a kiosk or in an instructional setting, but I don't think it will ever be on the desktop as more than a passing fad. The current popularity of the touch screen is based on having it [u]at your fingertips[/u] on your phone. To get an idea of how it would be used on your desktop, scale up the motions. What was a 1- or 2-inch finger motion on the iPhone or Droid is now a foot-long arm sweep. I've used touch-screens extensively in the past (when all you did was reach and touch–no sweeps or flicks). It's initially nice to be able to reach out and touch the screen location you want, but using it for more than about a half-hour is extremely tiring to both your arms and shoulders. Touch screen might get some attention as a desktop novelty, and there's always some idiot who will buy it, but on the business desktop, it will die a rapid (and well-deserved) death.

Archie Hendryx
Archie Hendryx

Spot on and great comment. The popularity of the IPhone speaks volumes on how touch screen is something consumers are already accustomed to and quite obviously like. Companies such as Shuttle XPC have marketed their touch screen model as their main product and there definitely still is immense potential for this interface to develop.

Alganon
Alganon

The story is about trends. These three are trending up, and Microsoft is trending down. At last we see some sanity in the market. For software to get back to true creativity we need to see this happen. Too many Directors of too many boards, have for too many years held the view that, "No one ever got prosecuted for specifying MS". This ignorant mindset has allowed MS to become the convicted abusive monopolist that it is.

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

I had an HP IPAQ with Mobile Office on it and to be honest, I liked it. I actually wrote a paper for school on it once.

---TK---
---TK---

Also the fact that they have a limited life of write cycles... Good luck hosting a high volume DataBase, how long do you think it will last... couple days? Speaking from experience.. I do have a 32 Gig SSD, but I will use my two 36 Gig raptors in a RAID 0 or 1 any day over the SSD drive. The numbers look great, however that's about it...

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Enrollment in IT programs at U.S. colleges has been down for years. If nobody's getting the degrees, outsourcing becomes a more attractive option.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

There's a link to the transcript at the bottom of the video, and the content is summarized below that. I don't look at many videos regardless of their source. I too find body language distracting, and absorb information better by reading.

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

Every time we go to Sam's club, he plays with it and claims that he wants it. I look at the price tag and that is about it. I agree that they seem cool but as far having a touch screen as your desktop, I agree that people won't be as keen.

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

Touch screens are handy for some tasks. Especially consumer toys, mobile communications and info devices (such as iPhones, etc). But for serious users trying to get serious work done on a real work station (desktop, laptop, etc) I don't see it. Chuckle, its like where I work. I've been much amused by a number of people who've become enamored with Blackberry's, iPhones, etc. One salesman, for instance, loves his device and was constantly showing it off, bragging about it, etc. At first. Oh, it was fine for looking stuff up, reading notes or schedules, etc. At first he made some comment that now he'd hardly ever need to use his laptop or desktop. Could do all his work on the go, where ever he was, all with just a device that fit into his pocket. LOL ... and then I saw him rushing into his office one day and jumping on his desktop. I asked, he replied that he was playing "catch up". Trying to read, follow, make notes about, etc extensive and detailed specs on a request for bids. Then do the required research and lookups, data entry into a spreadsheet that had hundreds of columns and rows to work up an estimate, then the writing of a 20 page detailed proposal, and so forth ... was nigh to impossible and would take forever on a handheld device. Not to mention the many emails he needed to make with RFI's, inquiries, requests for cost estimates, and so forth. On his hand held, a daunting task. At his desktop his fingers flew. Multiple apps open, fast task switching, emails being composed and sent in seconds. Select and copy here, paste over to this doc. Fast jumps here and there in his custom spreadsheet for working up estimates, things moving around almost faster than the eye could follow (he's been doing this sort of thing for years, knows all the mouse and keyboard shortcuts for navigating huge spreadsheets and he's a very fast typist). Etc. He's now come to the conclusion that his hand held device is handy for checking his emails anywhere he's at, and for making short replies ... like he'll respond in detail later when he's on a real computer, and for having his notes and schedules handy for reference. But ... its a tedious, difficult to use device for most other purposes. Nice, if all yah want to do is look at stuff. Myself, I'm an engineer and programmer. Touch screens hold little interest for me. Have used em. Same deal. If all you need to do is look at stuff or look up stuff, they're fine. Or if you're just making a brief data entry of some sort. But for real work, I need a keyboard and mouse/touch pad. Mouse for fast, detailed pointing. Doing a CAD drawing with a standard touch pad sucks. But I also use keyboard commands and shortcuts a lot. Can often do things faster that way than using a mouse, touch pad, or touch screen. And, of course, for alpha-numeric data entry, nothing beats a keyboard. And in my work, I do a lot of alpha-numeric entry. On my desktop I use a combo system. Keyboard, with small touchpad just below the keys. Most times I never have to move my hands more than an inch or so. Use touchpad for fast mouse moves that don't require great accuracy. Switch to regular mouse when appropriate. But I use the keyboard MUCH more than either the touchpad or mouse, except when doing graphics of one type or another. Touchscreens, IMHO, are best for USERS. Keyboards and mice for DOERS.

drew.mcbee
drew.mcbee

I'm with Nick on this. Touch screens are just cool to look at - not really a business tool. The multiplication of motion on a desktop screen is the problem. How is it efficient for a user to make a 16-20" motion with their arm and then another 8-12" motion with their finger to move a file from one folder to another, when they can do the equivilent in about .5" with a mouse?

Archie Hendryx
Archie Hendryx

who's to say that the desktops of the future may well be nothing more than touch screen hand helds which can have their displays magnified on bigger monitors if need be?

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

I just don't see 2010 as the year for the simple fact that at the present time, I don't see the benefits outweighing the costs. Touch technology has already been applied in many scenarios where it is practical such as medical facilities for patient care. I do agree that applications like the IPhone have made us more comfortable with touch screens I just don't see many companies making the investment into the technology with out seeing the return at this point.

jeslurkin
jeslurkin

I think we only need to look at the history of light pens... (ever use one?)... to see the future of touchscreen. They will probably be useful for tablet or 'table' computers, not for vertical screens. Mouses easily replaced lightpens. They have yet to replace the KB. (TG!) :) (Interesting: My spellcheck tagged 'lightpens' (and 'spellcheck') but not 'mouses'.) :)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

and asking for replacements. Maybe the implementation on the iPhone is better; I've never seen one.

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

I don't see this as Microsoft trending out. I see this as MS trying to take on a market where they are the dominant force. For some time, MS has dominated the desktop OS market and has had success in the server OS market and at this point, I don't see that changing.

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

Note ... I stated that enrollment into the core real sciences, engineering, and mathematics courses was down amongst CERTAIN groups. Notably, your standard white, middle class types that're 3rd generation or greater Americans. Particularly ... males. There is an increase in enrollment in the mentioned fields overall. With the offset being primarily made up of foreign student enrollment and a near doubling of the numbers of "minority" students ... particularly Hispanics. (Note, info gathered from a report by the National Science Foundation. What I read was a printed copy of the report, which wasn't mine, so I don't have a copy handy.) Which is not a bad thing in and of itself. Just a reflection of changing times. I teach, part-time. On top of my regular job. Some very specialized courses. Plus an occasional fill-in for some evening classes when a regular instructor is sick or whatever. Its just a subject we sometimes talk about. And the report I mentioned above was passed around to full and part time staff where I do the part time teaching gig. As it seemed to confirm our real world observations. i.e. The changing makeup of our student group in the classes. Used to be overwhelmingly "white" and male. With "standard", Anglo-Saxon names. Now, more and more we're seeing Hispanics, Asians, and Middle Easterners. Plus the children of obviously recently immigrated Eastern European types. Which is fine. A student is a student. And these are as able and bright as any. The reason it perked our curiosity and caused us to speculate as to why and what was going on is that statistically the number of white kids that were coming into college/tech school age was on an increase from 2001 until present. But their enrollment into science and engineering courses was on a decline. Percentage wise. My own pet theory was that many of them were simply too "comfortable". Not inclined to hard work, mental or physical. So they were choosing easier fields. While the new faces I was seeing (the increased "minority" ones) were from families where mom and dad had to struggle more and work harder to get to the place where they could send their kids to the type of schooling they were attending. Of course, I could be wrong. It just seemed a reasonable thought to me. I was myself born poor, dirt poor. By today's standards in the U.S., think 3rd world type poor. I was born in the U.S., but way in the back hills, some years ago. Chuckle, for instance, we didn't have our home wired for electricity until I was 9 yrs old. And I can remember being fascinated the first time I saw a HOME with indoor plumbing. Anyway, I was born on a poor, dust bowl of a farm in the back hills, where it was hard work just to keep everyone fed. And cash money was hard to come by. The land was poor for farming and we had little by way of modern farming technology and equipment. The adult males of my family clan were always on the lookout for extra work. Didn't matter much what it was, as long as someone would pay for it to get done. Anyway, I can remember being pressed by Dad and Grandpa (and Uncles, etc) to be unafraid of hard work and long hours. They were pretty much of the opinion that as long as a man was willing to work hard at whatever it took to bring home the bacon and feed his family, and as long as he knew how to use his hands and/or brain to get something done that someone else wanted done and was willing to pay to get done ... he'd make do. At the same time, they pressed me to get a better education than they'd had. Grandpa never got past the equivalent of the 6th grade. Dad had dropped out in the 10th, in order to go to work to help out the family. They didn't know squat about things like psychology, "entertainment" professions, dealing with margins on the stock market, etc. What they'd seen, and admired, and looked up to as a way of life that was "better", was being an engineer. Or a highly skilled technician/mechanic of some sort. Someone who knew how to design and create something people wanted and used. Or build it. Or fix it. So that's the way they pushed me. To learn more science, math, etc. With that sort of push; and given that I'd had a lifetime of seeing examples of men working and sweating at difficult tasks 12 or more hours a day. While it did seem a bit daunting to me at first, I took courses I thought at first to be above my meager abilities. Had to work at some of em harder than my peers. Keeping in mind that I was sitting in classes where the students were mostly made up of kids from families well above the social strata of my own. So I kinda thought of them as being smarter and knowing more than I did from the start. To my surprise, and believe me ... I was surprised, I held my own. In fact, I made my way up into the top 5 percentile. Chuckle, meant that I was studying extra while the rest of my fellow students were out socializing and partying. But I had the past experience of seeing members of my own family work harder and longer just to get a little of what other folks had. Or seemed to have. So that didn't bother me. Not when I saw that I was actually succeeding at reaching their level ("their" meaning the kids from what I considered an upper level of society, the successful). It was dawning on me that I might even best them, or at least some of them. And I was further motivated when I went home and proudly displayed records of exceptional grades in subjects that members of my family clan didn't even know what they were. And got hugs and pats on the back, and congratulations. And saw Dad puff up with pride and tell his friends how his son was excelling at such and such. He had no idea what such and such was or what it might be used for, but he was damned proud. Get my drift? That's all I was commenting on. The shifting faces seen in those science and engineering classrooms. They're the faces of the "hungry" students. Willing to work a bit harder, sweat a bit more, take the more challenging courses. Same applies to the skilled trades.

paul.duffany
paul.duffany

I have seen both skilled and unskilled HB1 visa holders in our offices. Some simply hide behind screens while others are stellar performers. I don't see a difference between our citizens performance and those of foreign countries. I do know that countries like India have emphasized that their Higher Learning Institutions have a high priority for Technical Programs, while our country has not. This is an issue that has to be addressed at the highest levels in this country, instead of cutting grants and raising tuition, all the while ignoring the fact that High Tech is the future and should be promoted and intensely pursued in all levels of our school system. To do otherwise is simply moronic considering what we know. Deeper thinking is required for this subject, and I encourage you to engage accordingly and speak your thoughts. Greed takes on many disguises, but needs to be seen for what it is. Thanks, me

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

While looking for articles to support my position, I found the trend is reversing. Enrollment in IT is up for the first time since 2002. http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2009-03-17-engineering-computer-enrollment_N.htm although other sources reported the same reversal. "The spike in majors comes as especially comforting news for IBM and others that often could not fill enterprise-computing jobs because of a paucity of qualified college graduates." Regarding trades, I believe there's still a huge demand for tool & die and CNC skills.

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

Last few times I checked, enrollment into all types of post-High School educational programs was up. Everything from private, commercial trade schools to colleges. Granted, one of the problems is that enrollment into programs focusing on the hard sciences, mathematics, and engineering is down among some groups of people. Particularly 3rd generation plus so-called "white" Americans. (I hate classifications like "white", "black", etc as they're pretty much meaningless terms.) Likewise, its getting harder and harder to get "white", middle class kids interested in blue collar trade schools for becoming mechanics, electricians, plumbers, carpenters, etc. Even tho in many places in the US a fully, formally trained and experienced, licensed "trade" worker can make as much as the average college grad. It just seems that a lot of our youth are "comfortable", and not particularly interested in any endeavor that strains the brain too much or causes heavy sweating and sore muscles. So others are starting to fill the gaps.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"How many HB1 visas are here? And what is the unemployment rate here?" You missed, "How many of those unemployed are qualified to fill those slots going to those visa holders?" That's another easy one.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

it didn't matter whether the degree program focused on business analysis or programming. Either way, there don't appear to be many students interested.

paul.duffany
paul.duffany

Not the disease. Don't be chicken, come out of your egg and see what your gov is doing to you...... Or not. How many HB1 visas are here? And what is the unemployment rate here? Hmmm, how many easy questions like this are there? If you suffer from bad math skills, then it does not matter. Chicken or egg, you will not get breakfast.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

Outsourcing and the over-supply of talent has driven down wages which in turn has driven students away from CS.

paul.duffany
paul.duffany

If your gov. does back room deals to outsource your job (carbon penalty), or wipe out usury laws(760 fico and got my CreditCard increased to 20% today), or bail out the biggest banking ponzi scheme in history(banks creating money by creating loans), and finally taxation without representation (I remember when a U.S. Corp. had to be a U.S. Corp to avoid taxes, but not anymore; you and I pay their taxes to outsource our jobs) Otherwise, you can move to a country where your "im a subject, not a citizen" attitude is correct. Otherwise stand up for the Constitution. Don't be a sluggard, do your homework and stand up for your country. Remember, silence implies consent. me

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Point of sale systems in bars/restaurants. They have ordering and customer tracking capability, all done on the screen. Order slips are printed at the bar and in the kitchen. Pay right there: swipe the card and print the receipt. They're fast, they're easy, and they're reliable. And any wait staff that prefers the order pad to the touch screen...well, they haven't really used the touch screen. But since menus don't change very much, it's a static system that often relies on staff knowing that "Special One" is the steak special and "Special Three" is the soup special. etu

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

How accurate can one be with touch capability? If you're dragging a file, can you hit the folder you want? CAD users and gamers probably will remain with digitizers, mice, or dedicated controllers.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If you're a touch typist, converting to a Dvorak keyboard would help, but you'd have to relearn all those reflexes stored in muscle memory. You'd also be handicapped when you used one of the majority of systems with a QWERTY board. If you're not a touch typist, it might be smart to learn in conjunction with switching to a Dvorak keyboard. But it would help to learn touch typing regardless of the keyboard used.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

I do know the vast majority of keyboard users are not touch typists, so any loss of productivity in those cases is more related to trying to find the right key on the QWERTY layout. Did find a site that determines how much more mechanically efficient (hand and finger motion, etc.) Dvorak is over Qwerty: http://www.codeaxe.co.uk/dvorak/Default.aspx

n.smutz
n.smutz

I wonder if we'll ever standardize on a keyboard that's not designed to handicap the typist.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

[i]n addition, the keyboard itself has remained a standard for more than twenty years - even way before computers came along.[/i] Don't sell the keyboard short. The QWERTY layout is 135 years old. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QWERTY

petraborchert
petraborchert

The trend that isn't new, but goes against the near future use of touch screen, is the desire for larger screens and multiple screens used with desktops. With most programs keyboard driven, the use of touch screen would slow the process of interfacing and thus is too inefficient for business use. However, I feel that the graphic design & creative world may embrace touch screens before the business world.

drew.mcbee
drew.mcbee

Most heavy desktop users are bound to their desks. It doesn't make sense for them to work on this little handheld and display big things intermittently on a big(er) screen as needed. Though the size of the actual desktop hardware ( tower ) will get smaller, they will always need (want) a full size screen. Also - the standard keyboard will always be here in some form. We have tried to replace it, but humans like the tactile keyboard. In addition, the keyboard itself has remained a standard for more than twenty years - even way before computers came along. Oh, come on - you remember typewriters don't you?

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

But it will be a while before we see it, particularly for personal use. And if you're going to go that route, you might as well add a keyboard and mouse and make the interface up into a full docking station.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I remember touch screen monitors in kiosks in the early '90s. I believe the hardware transmitted light from the sides, under the bezel, across the front of the display. The user's finger on the screen would block or reflect the light. The resulting interruption would be converted to XY coordinates. While similar (relatively expensive) technology was available for desktop, it never took off. Perhaps it was the expense, perhaps a lack of applications to take advantage of it.

jeslurkin
jeslurkin

Thanks for the info. Never considered that possibility. :)

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

WebOS, iPhone, and Android are all far better. Even Windows Mobile is better than the BlackBerry touchscreen.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

They find the touch screen too cumbersome to control effectively. I have that problem, along with a lack of tactile response and just generally being ham-fingered (I hate touchpads too).

tracy.walters
tracy.walters

Well...I for one love my BB Storm, as do the other dozen or so people in my company that have one. I'm curious what they hate about it?