Social Enterprise

Fixed Mobile Convergence can centralize business numbers and reduce airtime

Fixed Mobile Convergence allows users to have just one business phone number that can ring in multiple locations and on multiple devices. In this interview with Pejman Roshan, co-founder of Agito Networks, learn exactly what FMC is, some of the common misconceptions about it, and the ROI for deploying it.

Podcast

Fixed Mobile Convergence allows users to have just one business phone number that can ring in multiple locations and on multiple devices. It can also consolidate voicemail boxes and preserve the privacy of a personal cell phone number, even if you use that cell number to pick up business calls.

In this interview with Pejman Roshan, co-founder of Agito Networks, learn:

  • Exactly what FMC is
  • Some of the common misconceptions about FMC
  • Why Pej left Cisco to start Agito and build an FMC product
  • The ROI for deploying FMC

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About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

2 comments
jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Original post: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=663 If you have company cell phones and employees who use them in the corporate buildings, do you think FMC could save you money by using Wi-Fi instead of picocells? Would it be worth deploying FMC just simplify business communications for users by decreasing the number of phone and voicemail boxes that they have to track?

marco.fratti
marco.fratti

The answer depends on many things: - What FMC technology are you going to adopt ? - Which business owner will be operating the FMC technology and how it will do this ? - How will your functional architecture look like ? - How the functional architecture can leverage the present enterprise asset ? - How the FMC expected operations will impact financial metrics (e.g. ROI/TCO, etc.) Ultimately, a business case that answer the above questions (and additional ones..) can tell you whether the FMC adoption is viable and sustainable Best regards Marco Fratti President - Marcommcept