Windows

HP launches full-powered $500 mini-notebook aimed at business travelers

Hewlett-Packard jumped into the ultra-portable, ultra-mobile computer market by launching its HP 2133 Mini-Note. The 2.6-pound notebook will go on sale on April 15 and is aimed at two specific markets: business travelers and schools.

Hewlett-Packard, the world's third largest seller of notebook PCs, jumped into the ultra-portable, ultra-mobile computer market today by launching its HP 2133 Mini-Note (below). The 2.6-pound notebook will go on sale on April 15 and is aimed at two specific markets: business travelers and schools.

The specs for the HP 2133 are:

  • 8.9 inch screen with 1280 x 768 resolution
  • 1.6 GHz VIA C7-M processor
  • 512 MB RAM (upgradeable to 2 GB)
  • 120 GB hard drive (160 GB optional)
  • Full QWERTY keyboard (just 8% smaller than standard keyboard)
  • Integrated 802.11a/b/g Wi-Fi
  • Integrated Ethernet port
  • Two USB slots
  • ExpressCard slot
  • SD/SDHC card slot
  • VIA Chrome 9 graphics chip
  • Built-in stereo speakers
  • Bluetooth (optional)
  • Webcam (optional)
  • 4 GB solid state drive (optional with Linux only)
  • Extended six-cell battery (optional)
  • Computrace (optional) to help IT pros track lost or stolen machines

HP will sell the basic version of the machine with SuSE Linux for $499. The same standard version of the system will sell for $599 with Windows Vista Basic. HP will also offer a $749 version aimed at business travelers that features Windows Vista Business, a Webcam, Bluetooth, 2 GB RAM, and an extended battery.

Further reading:

Bottom line for IT leaders

While HP's 2133 Mini-Note PC will get most of its ink as an educational machine that will compete with OLPC, Intel Classmate, and EeePC, Hewlett-Packard will also offer a $750 configuration aimed squarely at business travelers. This could be an attractive option for IT departments that support heavy road warriors because it is less expensive than most ultraportable laptops and UMPCs, and since it runs the standard Windows OS, IT can deploy its normal software package on this machine.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

18 comments
TripleII-21189418044173169409978279405827
TripleII-21189418044173169409978279405827

I have a e-machines (bought because Linux works flawlessly) 1.8 GHz Celeron, 1 gig of ram, 160 HDD, etc. It came with Vista Home Basic and I played with it, basically, just uninstalling all the crapware and seeing what it was about (never used Windows as my primary OS) for about 6 hour. It's just not very pleasant. I am not used to 3-4 second right click responses, not opening more than one app at a time (i.e. waiting for the spinning cursor to stop), and with nothing, nothing but AVG and ZA running, it has run out of memory 3 times. All around, it is just sluggish. I installed Mandriva One, and as I knew I would, I have a powerful workstation that runs 10-15 apps (including VMWare with VM Images of products I work on at work), it never has swapped (that I could tell), and is what I always expect, virtually instant response to mouse/keyboard/menu navigation. Aside: Not one, ever, even after leaving Vista alone overnight to "do whatever MS wanted to do to their OS" did the HD ever stop spinning. If the full machine ("low end for Windows OS") is an unpleasant experience, what will the above specs mean for the user. TripleII

dcsilvap
dcsilvap

Sound nice, they could also consider Windows XP as an option. How good can it be with Vista? Really don't think so.....

CaptBilly1Eye
CaptBilly1Eye

The standard HD was 160GBs, it came with 1GB RAM, it had a FireWire port and one more USB port. Other than that.... interesting alternative to lugging around my 10lb. notebook when less will do.

fowlesjohn
fowlesjohn

I am actually quite amazed that it has taken HP nearly 10 years to resuscitate the concept of a smaller notebook They had introduced the wonderful first HP Jornada "PC Companion" the fantastic Jornada 820 back in 1998 but dropped it after their merger with Compaq meant that they decided to concentrate on the Ipaq and its miniscule button keys The 820 form factor produced a similarly compact device with a useable qwerty keyboard 90% the size of a normal notebook's I delighted with this news but at the same time I have to say that is so surprising that it has taken HP so long to return (more or less) to the formula they pioneered about 10 years ago with the first Jornada.That machine's spec and form factor was in many ways similar to the new model with a slightly smaller screen plus a man sized keyboard.Compared to this new announcement the 820 form factor produced a similarly compact device with a useable qwerty keyboard 90% the size of a normal notebook's. its main drawback remains the lack of programs for its ARM processor plus Windows CE, whose development veered away to other mobile versions. Used examples on ebay are however a real bargain I started a web page at http://www.johnfowles.org.uk/jornada/

tjohnston
tjohnston

I think its obious that the EEE PC from ASUS has turned heads amoung PC manufacturers. I don't know exact numbers, but I believe they've sold somewhere between 3 and 4 Million of their

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

however I think the last time I saw one was in '00 or '01. For their limited functionality they were very nice. However, the new one seems to be a bit more full blown as a computer instead of companion.

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

Some users will find this very handy due to the weight. However I think that most travellers would have a hard time with that keyboard. Where I work most travellers use standard notebooks due to display size, however many opt for the ultraportables for weight. I wonder how this will actually pan out. Maybe if Dragon Naturally Speaking was part of the package it would sell much better, as the keyboard would matter much less.

Jaqui
Jaqui

they picked Suse. when Suse developers decided that a web development choice for software required apache, php, mysql, postgresql etc they made it useless. [ sure the servrs come in handy, but it's far better to test on a server with only a standard set of extras installed, to make sure your website application will run anywhere than to have some BLOATED package choices FORCED down your throat.] They also decided that you absolutely have to have virtualization software, even if the HARDWARE doesn't have the resources needed to use it.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Which Linux distro do think is best for business users?

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

of course I have only tried a few distros, SUSE Enterprise seems to be making strides for business and MS compatibility.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Original post: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=652 What does your IT department currently deploy for the road warriors in your company? Do you deploy any ultraportable or ultramobile PCs? Do you think the HP 2133 Mini-Note would work for your road warriors?

johnd
johnd

I look after 22 very small sites all in the medical arena. They have a mass of staff movement between them. We have been looking for this category of product, low cost, ultra portable and name brand. Most of our new generation of applications will be web based and rely only on standards based browsers.

basstrumpeter
basstrumpeter

There are a couple of applications that don't run on Linux that are vital. We also won't "up"grade to Vista for at least another year on other systems; I would prefer XP Tablet but won't rule Vista out completely for this. Currently we have one UMPC in evaluation, none deployed.

mneote
mneote

I am not too keen on running Vista on any of our company's laptops or desktops. It would be just easier to get a machine with WXPP and device drivers already installed rather than wiping out Vista and installing WXPP plus looking for appropriate device drivers to make the Mini-Note work.

mars3132
mars3132

You wouldn't have to load the drivers or go searching for them, as they are already installed and ready to go. HP also keeps the drivers at their website, and HP also places on new systems a "System Recovery" option where you can make a back up of the system.

powerbroker
powerbroker

Sure - I think this would be a great little mini note book that may help to roard warrior - size and weight - the less I lug aroung the happier - battery life enough to last a few hours? - software package to get the basics done such as presentations, documents and email - if WIFI all the better - cost looks to be a winner

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