Tablets

HP TouchPad leapfrogs rivals in productivity

Hewlett-Packard has finally delivered its webOS tablet, the TouchPad. While it may not be an entertainment powerhouse like the iPad, there's a lot to like for business professionals.

On one hand, the HP TouchPad faces an uphill battle in the tablet market because the Apple iPad has been such a hit with the public and continues to gain momentum. On the other hand, the TouchPad has a great opportunity because the iPad's current rivals -- Android tablets and the BlackBerry PlayBook -- haven't exactly set the world on fire, and Microsoft and Intel haven't shown up yet with a true iPad competitor.

After working with the TouchPad for a week, I'm ready to declare it the iPad's stiffest competition yet for individual business professionals, who currently represent a quiet but very large portion of the iPad user base. The TouchPad is no match for the iPad when it comes to media, entertainment, and games, but for those who want the portability of a tablet but the work ethic of a desktop, the TouchPad has raised the bar on productivity.

Photo gallery

HP TouchPad: Unboxing, screenshots, and comparison photos

Specifications

  • Launch date: July 1, 2011 (U.S.)
  • OS: HP webOS 3.0
  • Processor: 1.2GHz dual core Qualcomm Snapdragon APQ8060
  • RAM: 1GB
  • Storage: 16GB or 32GB internal
  • Display: 9.7-inch XGA, 1024x768, IPS
  • Ports: Micro USB, 3.5mm headset
  • Weight: 1.6 pounds (740 grams)
  • Dimensions: 9.45(h) x 7.48(w) x 0.54(d) inches
  • Camera: 1.3MP front-facing
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi 802.11a/g/n; Bluetooth 2.1+EDR and A2DP
  • Price: $499 (16GB), $599 (32GB)

Who is it for?

The TouchPad will mostly appeal to professionals who want a tablet to handle work tasks -- Web-based business apps, email, instant messaging, contacts, calendar, etc. These will mostly be executives, project managers, IT administrators, and other business folks who want to purchase their own tablets and use them for work.

What problems does it solve?

One of the biggest unsolved problems in tablets has been content creation and productivity. The iPad's great strength is its singularity of focus. The app experience is immersive. But, the flip side of that is that it's not very good at multitasking. It's simply not designed for it. The BlackBerry PlayBook and Android tablets have tackled the issue and made some progress, but they haven't gone as far or done it as elegantly as the TouchPad, which allows users to group open apps and windows into logical groups, quickly separate, re-order, or close them, and jump between them with the flick of a finger. The excellent on-screen keyboard (including number keys) and the wireless dock and wireless keyboard make it easier to enter data on the TouchPad than other tablets. All in all, these productivity improvements make the TouchPad the most effective laptop replacement of any of the current tablets.

Standout features

  • Multitasking - Where the TouchPad really shines is in the interplay between multiple apps, multiple windows within the same app, and multiple browser tabs. When most professionals do work, they need to access multiple data streams at once and synthesize that information into a document or email message, and while they're doing it they may need to call, text, or IM a colleague to ask a question or get some data they're missing. In the middle of all that, they may also receive a message where they need to respond to someone else's question or issue. With its notification system, multitasking, and smartphone/tablet interaction, the TouchPad is designed to help these types of knowledge workers be (nearly) as productive on a tablet as they are on a laptop or desktop.
  • Full Web experience - The TouchPad also offers Web browsing that gets a lot closer to the desktop Web experience than the iPad. A lot of that has to do with its Flash capabilities, but it also handles some other interactive Web code better than the iPad, even though both are based on Webkit browsers. I'm not a fan of Flash but much of the Web is still based on Flash and will be for years to come. The TouchPad offers a much better Flash experience than the buggy Flash you'll find on Android tablets, but it's not quite as smooth as the excellent Flash experience on the BlackBerry PlayBook. Of course, the iPad does not support Flash at all. An example of how the TouchPad also works on some sites where the iPad does not is WordPress, the popular blogging tool. I actually started this review of the TouchPad on the TouchPad itself in the WordPress Web interface -- which does not work on the iPad.
  • Smartphone interaction - Most of the professionals who have a tablet also have a smartphone and there are times when it gets clumsy and confusing as to when to use which one for which task. HP has addressed this by letting you pair an HP smartphone with the TouchPad. I tested this with the Pre3 and was pretty impressed. It allows you to take a call received on your phone and bump it over to speakerphone on the tablet or take a text message from the phone and bump it over to the tablet's instant messaging app. There's also a feature called Touch-to-Share that allows you to take a Web page you have open on the TouchPad and share it to the smartphone by simply touching the phone to the tablet. This is fairly rudimentary stuff and it's limited just to HP phones, but it's nice start in bridging these two devices in some meaningful ways.
  • Email app - One of the iPad's worst features (from a business perspective) is the native email app. Using the app in portrait mode is especially clumsy, and moving between a message you're composing and a message in your inbox means you have to save the message, access your information, and then reopen your message from your drafts to finish it. The TouchPad streamlines that process with its multitasking capabilities and provides an email app that makes it a simple finger flip on the bottom of the screen to move from various email accounts and folders to your inbox/folder message list to a full-screen view of a message.

What's wrong?

  • Inconsistent performance - My biggest beef with the TouchPad is performance. It has a 1.2GHz dual core Qualcomm Snapdragon CPU and 1GB of RAM, so it's got the hardware to really move, and there are times when it flies between tasks and apps and runs great. However, there are also times when it unexpectedly chugs, freezes, or gets really slow. I never had it crash, but there were 8-10 times over the period of one week where it slowed to a halt. That's too many. I suspect this is a software issue and asked HP about it. The company responded that performance improvements are part of an over-the-air update for the TouchPad that will arrive after launch.
  • Bulky form factor - The look of the HP TouchPad echoes the first generation iPad. It has the same rounded corners and curved backplate, only it's black instead of silver and plastic instead of aluminum. Of course, by the time the TouchPad landed, Apple had already come out with the thinner and lighter second-generation iPad. By comparison, the TouchPad feels bulky and heavy.
  • Entertainment gap - The one big area where the TouchPad falls short of the iPad is in entertainment -- music, movies, and games. Some of you will say, "That doesn't matter for a business device." However, a lot of the professionals I know with iPads love to use them to watch movies during flights on business trips. The size of a tablet is perfect for a tray table or a lap, and it's much nicer than wrestling with a laptop. The TouchPad simply doesn't have the app or entertainment catalog to compete with Apple's iTunes or iOS ecosystem. However, if it could partner with Amazon, it could make up a lot of ground very quickly, at least on the entertainment side. Since Amazon has its Kindle app on the TouchPad at launch, at least there's some potential there.

Bottom line for business

For business professionals intent on productivity, there's a lot to like about the HP TouchPad. The email and multitasking capabilities alone are enough to give it an edge over the iPad. And, we haven't even talked about the TouchPad's ability to print (especially to HP printers) -- another important asset for some professionals. The expanded Web browsing capabilities are huge, too. It allows the TouchPad to access a lot of sites (Flash and others) that aren't accessible from the iPad. This can open the door to Web-based business apps and other important sites.

I expect a lot of the consumer-oriented reviews to hit the HP TouchPad pretty hard because of its bulkiness, lack of games and entertainment content, and fewness of third-party apps (although it's ahead of Android Honeycomb and BlackBerry PlayBook when they launched). Those are all valid concerns and because of them I certainly wouldn't recommend the TouchPad for the average consumer.

However, for people who couldn't care less about the latest games and movies and just want to get work done in meetings and on airplanes, the HP TouchPad will be a breath of fresh air. I consider it the most productive tablet yet and the first one that can serve as a legitimate laptop replacement for professionals on the road.

I think a lot of business professionals will find the TouchPad to be exactly what they were hoping for in a tablet because it will allow them to work the way they are used to working, but do it in the convenient form factor of a multi-touch tablet. I would fully recommend the TouchPad to professionals if it weren't for the performance issues and the fact that HP needs to add editing capability for Microsoft Word and Excel files (something HP says is coming "this summer"). With those two things in mind, I would recommend holding out until HP addresses those issues and adds more productivity apps to the catalog. I expect HP to keep pushing forward. Jeffery Ben, a Senior Product Manager on the TouchPad team, told me, "HP is committed to being on this journey for a long time."

For professionals, the TouchPad is a solid first step.

Competitive products

Where to get more info

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

45 comments
Andrew Emenimadu
Andrew Emenimadu

I have an Ipad2 Wifi/3G from ATT and just brought home the HP TouchPad that I got from EBay for ??USD,Guess what I am keeping the TouchPad and my wife is so happy that she is getting the Ipa2 Why?Too many apps,too much distractions.The Touchpad is meant for work.Screw Angrybird

HckrAdm2005
HckrAdm2005

I was able to get one of the 32GB touchpad's during the fire sale before they sold out and over all i'm happy with the Touchpad. The multitasking feature I think is the best between Android and Apple (I support both (No playbooks but just off shoots of Android tablets just as the gTab from View sonic, etc) in my office and have extensive use on them). It' easy to switch between applications, separate web browser instances (cards) and the resuming/continuous playing of the app in the background is nice as well ( and yes to stop the complainers I know that apps can run in the background in the other tablet OS's as well. So just chill). The battery which was my primary concern is actually not bad. I can easily get through a day of work without recharging the tablet. This is after constantly checking sending email, watching video's on YouTube and even some Skype chat. I've even left it in standby for a few days without having to recharge it (of course I didn't use it that much during that time either). The email client is a lot easier to use and more intuitive then the iPad or Android's. I've even shown it around the office and several users agree that going to email is much easier and some even liked the on screen keyboard better then android or iPad's. Opening and viewing word, pdf, excel documents with the touchpad works for the most part. When I was on version 3.0.0 the build in document viewer was buggy. With 3.0.2 (upgrading to which took for ever for the update to finish downloading. I had to constantly keep telling it to download the patch) the document viewer worked much better and was even a little bit faster. For business use I'm quite happy with this. For personal entertainment it is missing some extra apps/features that would be nice to have such as a Netflix app or being able to use the browser for Hulu. Of course this is probably due to the size of the community that develops for the Touchpad and if it grows (who knows what will happen now with HP's WebOS) hopefully these issues will be addressed. The built in Skype feature works "ok". I've had issues when talking to my roommate on our wireless network. He would sometimes cut out and the same goes for me when I talked. I did eventually "root" it with Preware. With preware I was able to install several patches that improved the swiping features on the touchpad, email interfaces to much more snappy and not sluggish when moving windows/panes, a feature to have a restart button show up when powering off the touchpad instead of just having a shutdown and sleep mode, and I even installed several utility apps. I have always gone by the impression that if I have to root a device to make it run better then the OS isn't ready. I've had to do that to several android phones for friends because battery life sucks (Yes even after task killers, me training them on how to kill apps manually and with the latest available android builds). I haven't had to Jailbreak an iPad2 yet but I didn't touch an iPad until the iPad2 came out and by then the development was much farther along then things are now for WebOS (yes there are probably hardware reason's as well, etc but i'm just keeping it simple). Overall for $150 it's a great tablet and I really like it. Will I put android on it? I dunno i'm going to wait and see what the future hold for WebOS. I may even pick up another 16GB tablet (if HP sells more again, we'll see) and just have that be my android version. I would recommend to people if they wanted something simple and that works to get the WebOS tablet but with the HP situation I of course can't.

DavidPlym
DavidPlym

I recently published a blog post article, which might be of interest to people reading this article about the TouchPad, entitled Using Tablet Devices in Learning, Teaching and Education with a focus on the HP TouchPad and the benefits of webOS. Please click here to view: http://wp.me/pFqgC-3S

MacNewton
MacNewton

Is Jason Hiner is on HP's payroll?

DHOLYER
DHOLYER

I started using HP back in 1975 in high school as we used a HP 3000 Mainframe Time sharing system for the counties school system. Personally I have a HP 6070 Multi media Half sized Tower system. New products have bugs but time solves these things, plus WWW connections make it almost instantaneous. And if you have instant bug reporting you almost do not need to report bugs. If the users desire the Multi Media feature it will in time get much improved. I'll give it a year for the bugs to be removed then I'll look into getting one.

colincrawford
colincrawford

Most want productivity and entertainment - so the suggestion that the Touch Pad is superior to the iPad on productivity fails to address the issue that most execs want to use the tablet for entertainment in their leisure time - the vast majority will not buy two tablets and will end up selecting one that covers both their business and personal lives. There will be some that absolutely want and need to keep these two worlds separate but they in the minority. I agree that Apple can certainly improve email and multi-tasking and other aspects of the iPad but these weaknesses are not enough to offset the huge range of productivity apps that are on the iPad platform. The HP TouchPad is a solid product and a welcome entrant to the tablet space but I don't think it will see massive sales unless that have some services that clearly differentiate the product. I'm all for greater competition spurring on improvements in the tablet market.

finder
finder

"There's an app for that". ;D

jonf
jonf

What am I missing? Android offerings in Tablets have much more to offer than the iPad.

johnswolter
johnswolter

You said,..."it may not be an entertainment powerhouse like the iPad,"...therefore it's dead already. Buying customers want entertainment...Apple's designs should have been a lesson to HP. Figure out how to put iTunes and other entertainment on it for more success.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

I believe HP took the time to make this a decent effort for, to them, a all-new product. I've watched HP for the last few years and of all the Windows PC manufacturers, HP is the only one who has tried to really use Windows' touch capabilities; no commercial software vendor yet has really done anything with the Windows Touch interface. More, HP's purchase of the PalmOS and taking the time to really try to build it into an enterprise market says they're looking to integrate their touch strategies in a manner similar to Apple's but aimed for a different customer base. I think it can work. Like any first-time effort, I can understand the bugs Jason mentions--not even the first iPad was perfect--and if HP shows a capability to address the bugs quickly while eliminating the carrier bottlenecks I can see the TouchPad as the first real competitor to the iPad.

Ole88
Ole88

I was a long time Palm user and had many of their devices. I had the Pre when it came out and enjoyed it. I started to falter on it when flash never came to the device. After HP bought Palm, all support and updates for the Pre dried up. I got so fed up with the lack of ability to browse a lot of sites that I dropped the Pre and went with an Android device. Due to the fact that I have not had any pleasant experiences with HP support professionally, I decided to drop them all together and I doubt they will ever come up with anything that will entice me to come back. Look at the bloatware that add to their printer drivers, that has been an issue at work and for many people I've talked to. Why don't they give you the "driver only" option in their installer? I don't see where the webOS or TouchPad will save any face for them.

Calcom Tech
Calcom Tech

I am a little disapointed by the review and it only got worse as I got to the end of this. The reason I was disapointed is because it seemed as if excuses were being made for its shortfalls just so that there is a true competitior to the iPad. Although I donot dispute the validity of the TouchPad, it just seems to me that all of the OTHER tablets are all missing something and we are giving these companies a break. The iPad out of the box was ready to go from day 1 with the iPad 1. You could perform any single item task you wanted right out of the box. Now it may have been a lite version of the performed action, but at least you could perform it. These devices coming out now are missing whole componets and still releasing these devices in mass production. Sure they say an update is comming that corrects all these issues but when do we draw the line and say enough is enough. Put out a product worth wild and worth the money right out of the box. Rather than saying give me your money now and in a few months I will make your money worth wild. It's just starting to get a little annoying to me when there has been a standard set by the iPad, (both 1 and 2) and others a failing left in right but asking for our money and wasting our time testing them out just to satisfy non Apple enthusiasts. Our industry MUST force them to do better.

Akais1
Akais1

This may be a good fit for a business user, but only if they do not need their email. If they are in any regulated industry (Banking, Healthcare, Govt., etc.) WebOS does not support Exchange Active Sync security settings so you can kiss email goodbye. This is one thing that all the other tablets do support. That may be this product's Achilles heel. It will be interesting to see

greg_mccusker
greg_mccusker

Great review Jason, honest and fair. I too will probably wait at least a few months... an OS update or two will do wonders. HP does seem to be committed to this, and IMO Palm's (RIP) webOS blows away everything else thus far. Word/excel editing is expected this summer via an OTA update, or as a third party app (QuickOffice I believe). Lastly, Google Docs intergration has been rumored as well.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Call me back when that's released and included in new units. I'm one who doesn't care about the entertainment uses, but isn't that just a question of waiting for apps to be developed? There are no hardware or OS restrictions on those functions, are there?

GMonTechRep
GMonTechRep

I have a lot of whitepapers in pdf and doc (plus rtf and odt) format and a few books in epub format. Is the reading experience on the Touchpad satisfying? How easily can I zoom in and pan pdf documents? Are they readable in full page or are the characters too small? Does it offer conversion utilities for doc, xls and ppt files? (I won't mention cbr reader, but sometimes a good comic book is better than a movie. I found that that zipping jpg scans into a cbr file allows you to see the scanned document in the desired sequence and lets you free to access and modify the jpgs whenever you see fit...)

Teacee
Teacee

I am a Apple Mac pro and Windows pc user Hp being my current and past laptop. The iPad does have multitasking capabilities, and is not only made for games and entertainment but one of the most powerful mobil devices on the market. There are productivity apps that allow you to work with documents, spreadsheets, or any other type of project. The iPad has a larger storage capability, longer battery life, and a list of remte apps which allows me to operate my pc or Mac from anywhere I have Internet access with sound from my remote computer sent to the iPad. This allows me to run flash based websites as well as any program on my computers. Like I stated, the Hp tablet is not anything Apple will have to worry about. By the was the Apple iOS 5 will have over 200 new features, one of them being able to send the video of the iPad to your big screen tv!

fnewtz
fnewtz

What can you say about the Toshiba Thrive that will be coming out in the next couple of weeks.

albayaaabc
albayaaabc

as me in HP user we will satisfication of using the technology that depend on many core with care of directory help !!!! it's imazing

christian
christian

Business people typically create documents on the go ... if they do not create documents, at least they comment them ... and want to share their findings. Jason, I am missing one important point in your review: does the HP TouchPad allow to receive let say a word document, a ppt presentation, an excel sheet, so that I can edit each of these documents on the TouchPad (make my comments or whatever on the go, during lunch ...) and send them back to my desktop/laptop ... with no lost of information (content, format) so that I can or my dear colleague can continue my/his/her work? Looking forward for your comment Christian

fishbone56
fishbone56

I get bugged on a daily basis by the question "when are we getting iPads?". Could the TouchPad be the business orientated tablet I've been waiting for, let's hope so, there's some very good features in there, the true multitasking is a real benefit as opposed to the in-out way of working on the iPad. I won't be rushing out for a fleet of them just yet though.

HckrAdm2005
HckrAdm2005

I like what I saw with the HP touchpad. The multi tasking feature is great and being able to use word press is big for me. I like HAL 9000 is very interested in battery life. I used to have an android phone but was hard to get 24 hrs of battery life out of it and with my windows phone (Samsung focus) i easily get 24 hrs (And no I did not root my phone but just did everything else but that). If the battery life is not impressive then I'm going to wait and see if they fix it before the windows 8 tablets come out.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

For hospitals than the iPad with it's ability to be docked and used there. However what's the battery life like? That seems to be one thing that no one is talking about. ;) Col

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Look at APSDave's post above. On the factory floor or in the warehouse, a 'fewness' of entertainment apps is an asset.

MacNewton
MacNewton

But for some reason Jason can get it working. Maybe he's to much in love with the payola from HP

Joop deBruin
Joop deBruin

Remember that Apple was late to apps, behind Palm. Remember Apple was late to the tablet, behind GRiDPad (Note that Apple stole iPad from GRiD) which was designed by the founder of Palm. Apple, always late to the game, always trying to sound like it was the first. Looks like the Palm folks are going to light up a black turtleneck sometime soon near you.

APSDave
APSDave

My company is looking at ways to implement tablets on our production floor as the amount of paper that managers, auditors and other positions print out to carry around on clipboards is mind blowing. We plan on deploying all of our documentation to some sort of web portal type experience and this would work perfectly for that. Like the author said, it's not going to be big in the consumer market. But we're looking to use it a lot like a clipboard that can dynamically change the papers clipped to it. And access our ERP system without having to walk all the way back across the factory to a workstation.

ricardoc
ricardoc

I agree with you that more often than not reviewers of technology like in this case seem to "justify" via excuses different devices??? shortfalls and that "all of the OTHER tablets are all missing something". The excuse for shortfalls is a sin in all of us as well as the fact that the iPad is missing features too. Let me expand... You said and I quote "The iPad out of the box was ready to go from day 1 with the iPad 1. You could perform any single item task you wanted right out of the box". I'm sorry but I think you too are making excuses and missing some facts about the iPad. From day one up until this day there is no real Bluetooth support. No sync/transfer of files via BT even after 2 versions (or should I say four versions; after all it is iOS 4.3.3). So that did not work out of the box; not even lite. Editing emails and trying to copy paste from other sources and attach stuff is still "lite" (very, very lite) since the amount of "save to draft" close, go back open and save again is a royal PITA. So that hasn't work till this day either. About the issue of missing whole components: flash is still missing and apparently will continue to do so on the iPad. Also missing is the ability to drag and drop entire folders from my computer/other device and "explore/browse" them on the iPad later. Tab browsing is still missing too; and please let's put aside the "there is an app for that" because the product was supposed to be "ready to go" not to be "completed" with a gazillion of apps for simple tasks. And last but no least Apple is the biggest sinner when it comes to as you say and I quote "give me your money now and in a few months I will make your money worth wild" (I guess you wanted to say "worthwhile"). Look at the development of iPhone and how many "features" that were supposed to be from day one have been added little by little in subsequent versions. Regarding the as you say and I quote: "It's just starting to get a little annoying to me when there has been a standard set by the iPad, (both 1 and 2) and others a failing left in right but asking for our money and wasting our time testing them out just to satisfy non Apple enthusiasts" I better don't tell you how annoyed I'm with the fact that standards has been set for more than 5 years by Nokia, Motorola and other mobile device makers for BT sync and still the iPad and iPhone rely on the stupid cable for everything. Indeed "Our industry MUST force them to do better".

genenyc
genenyc

I work for a major financial company and we switched to Exchange Server a few months ago. Setup was a breeze on my Palm Pixi (and equally so on my MacBook Pro running Snow Leopard) and Email, Calendar and Contact integration works like a charm! Now it doesn't matter which device I choose to compose an email or schedule an appointment, it all syncs up very reliably and quickly! One of the many nice things about webOS is that you can see incoming messages from ALL of your email accounts (GMail, Exchange, POP, IMAP, etc) in one central Inbox, just like on a decent desktop email client. For this reason, combined with the ability to answer and make calls on the tablet (very sweet!), user friendly multitasking and full-web experience, despite the limited app selection relative to iOS, I definitely plan to purchase a TouchPad, but will likely wait for the rumored 7" version to arrive later this summer, and to also allow time for an OTA update to fix the minor UI bugs that have regrettably been noted in reviews by Jason and others as well.

tomtex
tomtex

Correctly it is not MS Active Sync but then its not an MS O/S. WebOS is actually Linux based and supports multiple mailboxes through one stack so I can access my work email, gmail and Linked-In all in the same place. It also picks up contact details from multiple sources so will show a picture from Linked-In against a duplicate contact in Exchange. Everything Jason has said is true as far as I can tell but I think that the HP Touch Pad will definitely be very successful in the Enterprise Cloud. WebOS as a desktop client will advance the relationship between mobile, pad and pc. You can bet the developers will want the productivity that ENYO brings. Hands up! I work for HP and can't wait to see how this rolls out. Although I'm usually quite stoical about technology, this product line energises me and my colleagues. Don't just take my word for it. Get hands-on for yourselves and you'll love it too!

spawnywhippet
spawnywhippet

Kind of amusing that an Apple fanboi claims the ability to remote into a Windows PC in order to view interrnet Flash is an iPad plus point, rather than a huge gaping hole in not being able to do it natively :-)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

And do you respond, "Why?" Is there a technical reason your users are expecting these, or do they want new toys?

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

I had good luck with battery life, although other reviews have reported challenes. It was comparable to the iPad for me. It goes into low power mode when it goes to sleep, even though I had sync turned on. It easily went a couple days without a charge under medium use. I never had a problem making it through an entire day on battery power.

DHOLYER
DHOLYER

Do you know were the GUI type interface came from, Indirectly from the GEM operating system. At the time Apple and Atari were in a battle over a good GUI interface, Apple and later MS used the concept. Atari bought some rights to it for their Atari ST (16/32 bit OS). Legally it was not real theft since GUI interface was given as Public Domain indirectly by Xerox who created it in the 60's by creators working for the Military. So in ways the GUI Interface that grew Apple from 3% to 8% sales was a gift from our tax money. And Apple may now be at 13% of computer sales thankx to the PAD computer but they are still small in the market domain. And they have not brainwashed me yet. The closest I get to Apple stuff is when I eat a biological apple after I've washed it off with water. Let me see any Apple product survive that.

xtensha
xtensha

I would argue that the iPad / iPhone grew out of the Apple Newton. I could be mistaken but didn't the GRiD come out in 1989? This being after Apple's own Newton which was around 1987?

MacNewton
MacNewton

This pad is DOA, with just under 700 Apps (not optimized for the tablet) and a very poor advertising this unit will be the laughing stock of the tablet world.

Teacee
Teacee

Lol fan fan boi, hmmm if that statement was aimed at me, I actually own more pcs then apple,s yes I use both. And you obviously missed the point. The ability to log remotely in to my pc or my Mac is not only for the ability to use flash even though you can. And if that's your only point concerning iPad vs the Hp tablet is the lack of flash then you obviously as lost as the person who claimed this to be a worthy rival, sorry you lose.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

... I think teacee's method is the most efficient. However, based on Jason's review, we may see a new paradigm in mobile Flash viewing which may drive improvements in Android development. I do understand Apple's anti-Flash arguments because Flash is notoriously buggy on Apple's OS X and I honestly attribute that to Adobe still being pissed at Apple for openly competing with Adobe's photo and video products--especially since Apple bought their core Final Cut code from Macromedia, the company that originally created Flash.

Derek Schauland
Derek Schauland

Sure there are good reasons to leave flash out, but there are also reasons that flash should be available on the iPad. I love the iPad and have learned to deal with the lack of flash, but couldnt they add a knob in settings to allow me to use flash if I choose... for a consumer device that blew up being controlled in such a totalitarian way is rather odd. I know that is how Apple does things, but provide some leeway here sheesh

MacNewton
MacNewton

The iPod touch was the first of the new technology . The Newton (message pad) was not the template for developing the iPad or any other Apple touch device. Because of Apple's financial problems in late 1997, then-CEO Gil Amelio made an attempt to sell the Newton technology to a third-party, and after failing to do so, decided to spin off the Newton division as a separate company. When Steve Jobs became CEO shortly thereafter, he pulled the newly-founded Newton, Inc. back into the parent company, only to dissolve the group altogether as a cost-cutting measure a few weeks later. If they had the cash it may have developed into something much better. For now we have the iPad, thanks to Jobs insight to the future. With the copying machines at full speed the world will soon be overwhelmed with cheap copies .

thekman58
thekman58

I don't even have to click the link to know where this is going (LOL)

MacNewton
MacNewton

Name 5 software programing products that are dead or soon will be. 1) Fortran (1957) dead 2) COBOL (1959) dead 3) Basic (1964) dead - or soon will be 4 Flash (1996) dead or soon will be 5) Pascal (1970) dead I did some work in pascal, Basic & Flash, most of us programers have we moved ahead. I would never go back to any one of them. I am now learning HTML 5 and found a cute little apple app called Hype developed by 4 Apple software engineers, a very basic program. Find it at your App Store. The press headlines about keeping Flash is all about the programmers theyt will need to give up something they charge a lot for. It's a cash cow. And they don't need to have someone trying to kill this off. Flash is old and out dated. If you really need to know the truth and understand whats going on, read this report. http://www.apple.com/hotnews/thoughts-on-flash/

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