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Interview: Ubuntu founder talks 10.04, cloud integration, and Ubuntu on tablets

Ubuntu launched the next big update of its OS on Thursday. We spoke with Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth about 10.04, the future of Ubuntu, and more.

Podcast

Ubuntu officially launched the next big update to its OS on Thursday. We spoke with Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth about what's in 10.04, the new UI, cloud integration with the desktop, and whether we'll see a tablet version of Ubuntu in the future.

The Big Question is a joint production from ZDNet and TechRepublic that I normally co-host with ZDNet Editor in Chief Larry Dignan. Larry is in San Francisco this week so this episode is a one-on-one interview with Shuttleworth (right).

You can play this 27-minute episode from the Flash-based player at the top of the page, read the full transcript below, or:

If you enjoy this podcast, please go to to our iTunes page to rate it and leave a short review.

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Full transcript

Jason Hiner

Welcome to The Big Question Podcast, episode number 29 for April 29, 2010. I'm Jason Hiner, and this is a joint ZDNet and TechRepublic podcast where we pick one of the hottest issues in the tech world and attack it head on. So, if you give us the time it takes for the average commute to work, then we'll try to make you smarter about one important topic every week.

This week we have a special episode featuring an interview with Ubuntu founder, Mark Shuttleworth, on the next big release of Ubuntu.

This episode is sponsored by TechRepublic's Guide to IT Policies and Procedures, which has over 100 customizable templates that IT leaders can use to really save some serious time and money. You can purchase a copy today and download it right away at policies.techrepublic.com.

This week's guest is Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu operating system, which it calls "Linux for Human Beings." Mark, welcome to the show.

Mark Shuttleworth

Jason, it's a pleasure to be with you. Thanks for the invitation.

Jason Hiner

So, Mark, this week Ubuntu takes another step forward with the release of version 10.04, a major release, which you guys do every two years. And with this one, you're really putting a lot of emphasis on the simplification and beautification of the user interface as well as integrating the OS with cloud services. So, tell us more about that, and tell us some of the stuff that you're most excited about with 10.04.

Mark Shuttleworth

Well, yes, as you said, this is a very significant release for us. We only do an LTS [Long Term Support version] every two years. It's fantastic that we're able to commit to doing them literally like clockwork every two years. We work with an enormous community of diverse upstreams, Debian and many others, and yet it all comes together, somewhat like clockwork for a great release.

The cloud is defining many different aspects of computing at the moment, and for us it's really interesting to try and bring cloud-like experiences to the desktop. And we're doing that from the sort of very social side of things, integrating Twitter and Facebook so that they feel like a natural part of your computing experience. All the way through to the service side, where we're making it possible for people to build out their own cloud infrastructures, very smoothly, very easily; to replicate some of the elasticity of EC2 from Amazon.

Jason Hiner

So, talk to us a little bit more about the cloud, which really, what I think of, and probably what people are going to think of at least on the desktop side, is Ubuntu One.

Mark Shuttleworth

Right. So, the key idea there is to move some of the things that people have traditionally associated with the Web browser into the desktop itself. For example, when you sign into your desktop in the morning, it will immediately start to tell you about things that have happened on Facebook while you weren't paying attention. And when things happen on Facebook you can have that delivered to your desktop in a discreet, kind of a - as a notification.

On Ubuntu One, we focused more on the way people manage their address book, manage their files, and making it possible for people to have sort of a seamless experience across multiple desktops, and ultimately, across all kinds of devices. So, for example, the ability to synchronize your desktop address book with your phone and across multiple desktops, the ability for you to ultimately sync any kind of documents across multiple desktops and potentially multiple devices and get access to it over the Web. It's that kind of seamlessness and instant access to data that we're striving for across the desktop experience.

Jason Hiner

Okay, yes. I've worked with Ubuntu One a little bit, the file piece, because that was already there. It's real similar to like Dropbox, services like Dropbox and others.

Mark Shuttleworth

Right.

Jason Hiner

SugarSync, I think, is another one. [So] you copy a file there and then any computers that you have that Ubuntu One connected, that service connected, it automatically syncs to the folder. So that's a really cool piece. But then you guys are also doing this contacts piece as well. So you put your address book in Ubuntu. If you have Ubuntu One then it kind of syncs up to the cloud, and I noticed there's actually a free iPhone app that will let you bring those contacts over. Is that the behavior? Are there other apps as well, like Android or other phones? BlackBerry?

Mark Shuttleworth

So, we expect that the address book piece will end up addressing all of the major handsets and devices. The more general proposition is also very interesting, though. And that is to say, "Can we create a replicating, synchronized, structured data store that you can use for almost any kind of application?" And, there are all sorts of interesting use cases for that emerging; for example, synchronizing credentials and bookmarks and Tomboy notes and various other sorts of structured data across devices as well. And that's an area where I think Ubuntu One differentiates itself; the ability to offer application developers an easy way to store data that gets replicated across all of the machines that a person has worked on. It's inspired a little bit by some of the work that's going on with HTML 5 and the client-side storage there, but with a special emphasis on the use cases, people who have multiple devices and want to keep that data synchronized across them for any application.

Jason Hiner

Okay, compare this a little bit for us to - Microsoft offers a few of these services with Windows Live, Apple on the Mac is offering a little bit through Mobile Me; how does Ubuntu One compare with those?

Mark Shuttleworth

In some areas I think that [Ubuntu One] is setting the bar, particularly on things like the structured data capability and the work that we have lined up around management of credentials and identity, essentially. In other areas, I think other companies have the lead. The key challenge for us, in the next cycle for example, is going to be to give people seamless capabilities to edit their documents on the Web. A lot of people are familiar with Google Docs. Zoho Office is another similar capability, and we'll be exploring that in 10.10, making it possible to share and collaboratively edit through the Web any document that you might have initially created on your desktop. So it's a very complex space. It's certainly moving very fast, and it's exciting to be sort of keeping the free software flag waving right at the front of it.

Jason Hiner

Nice. Okay. I'll tell you one area that's really interesting is the Ubuntu One music store. So you guys are launching this with 10.04, and what's interesting to me is you buy your music, but you have to connect it to an Ubuntu One account, as I understand it, and then it syncs that down to - or when you buy the music, it syncs it to your Ubuntu One account, and then that Ubuntu One account syncs it to all of your machines automatically. So you buy that and it's automatically on all your machines and then potentially on all your devices as soon as they sync.

Mark Shuttleworth

It's a very interesting kind of twist on the music store, the traditional music store capability, and it integrates those two elements very, very nicely. We see the file syncing capability as a general storage mechanism; and music content is just one kind of content that you might want to replicate. And we've taken some steps to make that attractive to people in terms of how that - how the music gets accounted for in your quota of storage and so on. So I think that will be very popular.

Jason Hiner

Yes, so that's an area where I think you guys are a little bit ahead. This has been a real big headache for iTunes users in terms of syncing different libraries, like with yourself and your spouse or your kids, that kind of thing. So that's a really interesting thing. Is there a multiple user angle on this?

Mark Shuttleworth

It's a really interesting question. I don't think we've nailed the full range of semantics that people might want to express in terms of how they share that data with other people, but in principle sharing is one of the basic primitives of the content store that Ubuntu One includes, so that will fall out quite naturally in good time.

Jason Hiner

And this is the kind of thing you're getting at in terms of Ubuntu One enabling this sort of fluidity of data with the store. Am I right? This is a good example of what you were talking about earlier?

Mark Shuttleworth

Very much so. And we expect that other people will build similar services that take advantage of Ubuntu One's store content replication capabilities. If you had any sort of content that you wanted to deliver to users, and you wanted to deliver it to all of the devices in their orbit, then Ubuntu One would be a very good transport, a very good way of doing that.

Jason Hiner

Okay, so we know, of course, that Ubuntu is open source, but are there APIs that make it easier for developers to tap into Ubuntu One?

Mark Shuttleworth

There are a set of APIs that are shipped as part of the standard desktop, and the existing Ubuntu One services use those. But third party developers are also capable of, and welcome to, use those. That would be again a focus for us, rounding out the portfolio of APIs. We've designed those APIs primarily to meet the requirements that we've articulated for Ubuntu One, but we expect that they will get fleshed out as third party developers start to use them and stretch them in new directions.

Jason Hiner

So, Mark, let's talk a little bit about the interface, because obviously, that's big. It's a big focus. you've talked about it in the past, about that being a real big part of Ubuntu and what separates Ubuntu is the "Linux for Human Beings" thing, [which] is about making the interface more accessible. I mean, you guys started this at a time when people had sort of given up on Linux on the desktop. And you guys really went at it with Ubuntu as a way of saying, "No, we can make this easy enough for everybody." So what have you done in 10.04, and what are the bigger goals that you're pushing for and how does [release] this help get you there?

Mark Shuttleworth

Well, the underlying commitment is to usability, to ease of use, to ease of discovery, to productivity, to making the platform something that you can share with confidence, and not just to your technology-savvy friends, but to anybody as a really constructive, positive replacement for whatever terrible experience they might already currently be having with their PC.

The various elements of that, some of them involve the way we are choosing applications, and so we made some tough choices in this round to go with simpler applications; applications that are more discoverable and easier for new users to use, especially around graphics and photo management. There's a sort of styling and visual element to that and so 10.04 represents the first step in a new direction for us where we use lights as the inspiration and we're really interested in the concept of "light" visually, and so that shows up in the look and feeling of the interface, but also in the idea of being light-weight, of being very agile, of being very fast, of starting very quickly, so Ubuntu in this latest release boots strikingly quickly. So there's a whole raft of inspiration there for us.

And then the final piece is about making it really easy for people to figure out how they can be productive on the platform. We've done a lot of work in this round focused on how people become aware of the state of their computer alongside to their current focused goals, so how they become aware of somebody messaging them or how they become aware of their network state, or changes in network state, the power state, and so on. That's an area that had really languished in Linux and so we decided to clean it up and get it right. There's still work to be done there, but I think we've made some very constructive first steps.

Jason Hiner

Tell us a little more about that. Give us some more examples of ways that you can see these things. You're talking about ways that you visually - a visual representation of your status or - you talked about this in relation to social networking status earlier. That's all part of this concept, right?

Mark Shuttleworth

Right. We've put a lot of work into what we call 'the indicators' which are that portion on the top right of the screen, of the Ubuntu screen, where we convey your network status, your presence online on various social network services, your battery, your power status, and we've introduced some new concepts there. For example, in order to reduce clutter, we're starting to create indicators of whole categories of capability; for example, one indicator for all of your different social network services, that they can all plug into. Part of that is just cleaning it up. That portion of the Linux desktop had become very full of personality -- let's put it that way. And we're introducing a crispness and rigor to just the way it behaves and the expectations that people can have of the behavior of all the things that display themselves up there.

We also want to - so cleaning up is one big meme, but the other meme is introducing some innovation. And the key innovation for us in this cycle is the idea of category indicators, aggregated views of things like your connection status across multiple social networks, or your status across different messaging systems; whether or not someone sent you an email or an IRC or an SMS; aggregating all of that. And the result is just to give the whole - that portion of the desktop a much less cluttered, much cleaner feel.

Jason Hiner

Now you have publicly stated that your goal with Ubuntu is to serve consumers. You're trying to make this more friendly, more accessible to consumers in all the ways that we've talked about, but Ubuntu can also work for business users. And you do have - there are some things in Ubuntu that make it friendly for business users, for example, the Evolution client can connect to Exchange. And you have other business software that's open source that can sort of emulate some of the things that you would normally have in a business environment. Right? Are you seeing [business] customers, and how conscious are you of people that want to use this in business?

Mark Shuttleworth

Very conscious. Just stepping back from Ubuntu at the moment, I'd say that open source generally is experiencing a real surge forward in awareness and in adoption in a corporate environment. Partially, that's been a result of the focus on efficiency that we've seen in the enterprise over the last 18 months to two years, and partly it's just the natural consequence of people's growing comfort with solutions built on Linux, built on open source. So there are a lot of startups now that are specifically using open source as a way to penetrate the enterprise market, which is a fantastic shift. And of course, open source dominates things like cloud computing, if you look at what's actually running on EC2, what's actually running on Rackspace, it's largely running on Ubuntu and it's largely running workloads that themselves are built on Ubuntu, so I think those things are important leading indicators of what's going to happen in the enterprise.

On the desktop front, I think the growing prevalence of enterprise apps being exposed through the Web [browser] makes Ubuntu, and Linux generally, compelling solutions for fixed function workstations and desktops. Traditionally it was many, many Visual Basic apps that blocked people from adopting Linux and today with the fact that most of the Visual Basic apps are being replaced by Web applications, Linux suddenly becomes a compelling way to access those [apps] safely and cost-effectively. So we see continual deployments at substantial scale of Ubuntu as a desktop solution, but what's really attractive is the way - the emphasis on fast deployments and lean deployments is really driving people to Linux and to Ubuntu in the data center and on public clouds.

Jason Hiner

How so? Actually that's a perfect transition because you talked about the fact that as apps move to the Web, it becomes less important as to what [OS] you're running on the desktop. It can be Windows, it can be Mac, it can be Linux. Besides the fact that Linux as an open source is cheaper [because] you don't have to worry about licensing. It's not even just the cost of the licenses, but the cost of managing them gets quite difficult, steep right? Beyond that though, my question would be, it is the deployment issue - you know, one of the reasons Windows is popular is because IT can deploy it quite quickly in terms of imaging and unattended installations and all of this kind of backend IT stuff. Do you guys have tools and processes in place to do that kind of thing?

Mark Shuttleworth

Yeah, very much so. Bear in mind that the heritage of Ubuntu is Debian, which if you really want to think about it, it's sort of system administrator expertise distilled. It's Linux done the way large scale administrators would like it to be done, and as a result it's very modular, which means you end up deploying just the pieces that you really care about, which in turn means that you end up patching less, updating less, and having less in the way of a security cross section to worry about and less in the way of data to move around in a distributed virtual environment. So, all of those things are positives for us.

The challenges for us lie in certifications with the high end vendors for whom Ubuntu is a relatively new phenomenon and they take some time to become comfortable with it. But if you look at the actual volumes of deployments, those tend to be the minority rather than the majority. There are a helluva lot more J2EE Tomcat servers out there than there are databases running under a traditional legacy database. If we look at the move to the - the NoSQL movement, that's all about horizontal scalability, having thousands of light-weight servers that attack the data management problem differently to having the traditional approach of having one really expensive server. And so Ubuntu really suits the use case for people who are scaling horizontally, and so doing the data management with those newer, more light-weight, more innovative data persistence data model approaches.

Jason Hiner

Of course, Mark, we can't really talk about computing right now without taking about the tablet issue, so I'm going to transition into that for a second. Of course, Apple's released its iPad, which has sold over 1 million units in its first month, and other companies like ASUS and HP have similar touch-based tablets in the works. And these tablets are really a competitor to netbooks for light computing, in my book. And Ubuntu has a version for netbooks called Netbook Remix, so you guys already play in this light computing space. What do you think about touch-based tablets, and could you see this as an area where Ubuntu could move into in the future?

Mark Shuttleworth

Linux has traditionally been a hotbed of innovation. People often use Linux to prototype and to build new kinds of form factors and new concept devices. That's certainly true in this sort of wave of innovation around tablets as well. A lot of the tablet prototypes I've seen are running Linux in one form or another.

Jason Hiner

Yep, Android in a lot of cases.

Mark Shuttleworth

Android is a particularly potent contender in all of this. It's become very popular with the folks who are building out devices and so the skills base around Android has grown very quickly. I think the really important thing for us to do is to figure out how we can deliver the things that we deliver very well into those new markets, and so I'll just observe the things that we've invested in in this cycle are pieces that are common not only to the netbook and desktop but to lots of other kinds of devices as well. You know, you want to know your network connectivity status on all of those kinds of devices, and you also want to access social networks and the contents that underlies your social networking on all of those devices. So I think there's a trajectory that takes us onto those devices but it's not something that we're scrambling to respond to Apple around. We'll see how the first wave of Android and other Linux-based [tablets] does and we'll deliver versions of Ubuntu into the markets where there's proven volume.

Jason Hiner

How complicated would it be to translate Ubuntu to a touch-based interface, and have you guys done any work on that already?

Mark Shuttleworth

We did a small push around touch at the level of hardware enablement in 10.04. We identified a couple of the key manufacturers and in partnership with them in order to meet the needs of some of the OEMs, we made sure that the fundamental hardware enablement is there. The really interesting piece is in how you reshape the applications to work well in a touch environment.

Jason Hiner

True.

Mark Shuttleworth

And there's been relatively little work in that regard in the standard Linux space. I think that that will happen, but the transition to make it possible is only just beginning. There are a variety of technologies that are duking it out for primacy in that more visual user interface category. And we don't yet have a clear winner or direction. So our focus is on continuing to support the PC OEMs who are currently shipping desktops and netbooks, and in investing in the pieces that we think will be important once the tablet - once the hype has died down and we have a clear idea of what the consistent requirements are, I think we'll be able to deliver a version of Ubuntu specifically for those markets.

Jason Hiner

So beyond your role at Ubuntu, and more your role as a thinker and visionary in the computing space, do you envision touch taking off? What do you think about it? Is it something that interests you, and something that you really think has some legs? Or is it this - or is it still up in the air; basically, a little bit of a fad connected to smart phones and more aimed - more suited, I should say, to smaller devices? What do you think?

Mark Shuttleworth

I think touch itself is here to stay, and in fact, I think we'll see gesture based computing across the legacy form factors as well, traditional PCs there. There are some things that it just feels very natural to do that way. And while there are issues, we'll work through those issues. So, touch, I'm feeling confident in as a meme. My view on tablets is really just that we won't be able to deliver anything in the very, very short term; and therefore, we'd rather stay focused on the things where we know there's proven volume, and perhaps work on introducing touch in those categories like netbooks and desktops. And then once the tablet thing has shaken out, we'll be able to shape an offering there that we can proudly put the Ubuntu brand on.

Jason Hiner

Okay. Well, that's all we're going to have time for today, but for more on this topic and lots of other tech news and perspectives, you can go to zdnet.com and techrepublic.com. I'd like to thank our special guest, Ubuntu founder, Mark Shuttleworth, for being here today to talk about the release of Ubuntu 10.04. So, thanks, Mark. We appreciate your time.

Mark Shuttleworth

It was a pleasure. Nice to speak to you, Jason.

Jason Hiner

If you're interested in testing the latest version of Ubuntu, we'll put a link in the show notes. You can download it, and of course, because it's open source, you can run it for free.

You can find my blog, Tech Sanity Check at sanity.techrepublic.com and on Twitter, you can find me at twitter.com/jasonhiner. So thanks for listening. We'll see you next week.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

38 comments
Murfski-19971052791951115876031193613182
Murfski-19971052791951115876031193613182

I work in a state government agency that's 100% Windows XP, and I've had very little time to learn about Linux. What I have learned makes me want to learn more about it, and that's one of the problems I have with Ubuntu 10.04; it makes it so easy to use Linux that I'll probably get too lazy really to dig in and learn the guts of the system. That said, the little I've seen of it makes several points: It's faster than XP. The interface will take some getting used to. The interface is easier to learn than XP. At least 95% of the Windows apps I use have a Linux equivalent. I'm putting it on a spare box at home, and with luck I'll be pretty good at it when I retire in about 20 months.

eshwar_mg
eshwar_mg

I installed Ubuntu 10.04 i my HP netbook Everything was fine until i close my Lid.After it went to hibernate it is not booting properly and i think the video driver is getting conflict with the kernel. If i boot the system it is not booting up it just stuck at the memory testing so every tie i have to boot from the Live CD and have select " Boot From Hard First " I f you found any solution pls mail it to eshwar_mg@yahoo.co.in

arun.sharma
arun.sharma

I like ubuntu but I can't install Oracle database in it... :-(

Wave_Sailor
Wave_Sailor

Let me first state the I like Ubuntu and where it is going - Thanks .... But one of the great things about Linux was it's ability to rejuvenate "Aged" PC's. I find with every new release of Ubuntu, it seems more bloated and requires more resources to run. Is there a version or flavour to use on these Aged PC's or should we use a different Distribution? It would have been nice to hear Mark's reply.

cliff
cliff

I still have my reservations about cloud computing for reasons I won't discuss here, but I think that Ubuntu's approach here is an interesting one. Many of us have our "digital" lives scattered across multiple platforms/devices. We have desktops, laptops, web tablets, smart phones, etc... Not everyone owns a host of devices, but I think it's safe to say that most of us use at least two of these devices in this day and age. Not everyone will appreciate the implementation, but I think it's good that an attempt is being made to consolidate all of this information. Instead of using each device as a completely separate tool, they can be used as different ways of accessing and manipulating your information; the appropriate tool being used at the appropriate time. Not everyone will welcome the idea, and there certainly are times when separation is necessary, but in a world where many are struggling to juggle the vast amount of information they've acquired, it's an idea whose time has come.

pgit
pgit

Ironically the embedded player/27 min interview does not work on my Linux system with any browser. 90% of flash content does play but every now and then someone does something that makes it difficult if not impossible. I'll check it out on another Linux box (this one is clamped down security-wise) and on windows if that doesn't work. pretty funny, really...

jschmidt
jschmidt

Integrating 2 random websites that are here today and gone tomorrow is a terrible idea.

Nathan Pruitt
Nathan Pruitt

I started out using Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) and have used at least 3 or 4 releases since then and my favorite was Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala). Mostly due to the sleek look of the wallpaper and the smooth edges around the buttons.I also liked how the login screen looked a little different. I'm not bashing 10.04 yet, but we'll see i'm running it on my virtual Linux box right now so i'll give it the benefit of the doubt for now.

cjshelby
cjshelby

I find Xubuntu runs well on PIII and K6 PCs with 256Mb Ram. Go much older and you need a distro like Puppy Linux or Tiny Me.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

It will be resolved with an improved player. Linux users: Sorry for the Flash snafu in the current player. However, on Linux you can easily play or download the interview from the RSS feed or the MP3 link, both of which are provided in the post.

TucsonGuy
TucsonGuy

I thought it was ironic as well that a article specifically about Linux had things that didn't work under Linux! I couldn't open the interview from the alleged link as well. I had to click on "Download the MP3" in order to listen to it! I would think this would be a bit embarrassing for them. Hey guys... you really should test your stuff in something other than Windows and maybe Mac - especially when you're posting about Linux!!!!

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

The kind of cloud computing involved with Ubuntu One is not running all your stuff in the cloud (Internet), but using the cloud to store and replicate data so that it's easier to move between different machines and make backups more seamless.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Not to mention much of the world still does not have highspeed internet.

wlinch
wlinch

Updates from 9.10 to 10.04 on two laptops and one desktop all failed. All three seem to be based on video card recognition.

gerard.de.graan
gerard.de.graan

At he moment Ubuntu One runs only on Ubuntu, DropBox runs fine on Windows, Apple and Linux. So Ubuntu One is ONLY a replacement for those people that only have Ubuntu machines and wish to share files with other Ubuntu users. I have Windows and Ubuntu machines, so I will stick with DropBox for the time being. And: their mail support is good.

binaryme
binaryme

I've been using Ubuntu on and off since 5.04 and think it's a good product. Generally speaking, everything just works and that's great... BUT, I do miss the inclusion of some important 'bits' after the initial install. I understand why some software isn't included (proprietary codecs, etc.) and I know these can be added easily but it can be a bit of a sticking point with new Linux/Ubuntu users. I'm not convinced about the menu changes in 10.04 (have been using it on my laptop since Saturday). As someone who is required to use many different computers everyday, having the window controls (minimise/restore/close) on the left is confusing... And, yes I know it can be changed easily enough I can't say I like the purple wallpaper (again, easily changed). I am a strong supporter of Linux/Ubuntu, and frequently introduce customers to it... but first impressions are important and it's harder to "sell" something I'm not 100% happy with. For this reason, I've been leaning towards using Linux Mint (based on Ubuntu) more often then not for the last few releases. I'm am willing to give Ubuntu a fair go, so I'll play with it for a couple of weeks before before deciding if it's a keeper.

genexxa27
genexxa27

I love my ubuntu machine for when I'm puddling on the net. I'm also getting my kids to use it. but my question is if they are going to tackle the issues of games. Come on we can be all work and no play. I know that there are Linux based games, but the games you can buy in the store are basically made for Windows. I'm wondering if they are going to make it easier to integrate them into Linux so we can enjoy them too and don't have to be a Linux guru to get them to work.

cjshelby
cjshelby

Ubuntu has always "just worked" for me, a great OS. Now I suppose it's my turn to "have fun". I did the upgrade last Friday on my desktop. Now the mouse and keyboard lock up when I attempt to log on. I jumped on to a thread in the Ubuntu forums where others are having the same issue. Curiously, several also have Asus motherboards as I do. I'm holding off on my laptop (Karmic) until I find out what the problem is. When I have time I may play around with it some more, but if I can't figure it out I'll have to revert to Karmic.

tstrowd
tstrowd

Integrate with Microsoft Active Directory like Suse Linux ? Hello? Why isn't this being pursued? This would put you on top!

tgerhard
tgerhard

I had Xubuntu on my ancient PIII and suffered through its poor performance for too long. Then I discovered Puppy Linux, and now the old fossil blazes. I've since done the same for a few other machines. I'm glad an attempt is being made to offer a *buntu for older machines, but it needs to be more aggressive.

jedmondson
jedmondson

was on a PIII box, Xubuntu. Other than graphics card issues (had to use the onboard graphics) it has performed flawlessly. Now, 10.04 on my new laptop is another issue. I am having the mouse freezing issues as others have reported.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

We most certainly did, and we're aware of the Linux problem. But, it's an issue with the Flash-based player and not just this podcast. It applies to all podcasts (until we get our new player). However, in the end, most people don't listen to these programs using the Flash-based player. They prefer to read the transcript, download the file directly, or get it via RSS. So, we felt confident publishing it, despite the Flash conflict in Linux. Apologies for the inconvenience.

rmerchberger
rmerchberger

Not to mention having remote access to data "just in case." Whilst traveling last week I actually had a USB key fail on me - Data's still there, but the physical connector failed. I had the data on a backup USB key... that I forgot to retrieve from a computer in an outlying area (150 miles away) - I had to disassemble the faulty USB key and shim the connector to get the data off, but it would have been handy to have a "plan C." The files were small enough that they could have been retrieved via dialup in just a few minutes - but the location where the key failed had DSL (slow, but functional) available. Personally, I'm not very keen on putting sensitive data "on the cloud" - tax records, receipts, etc. I prefer to keep @ home (& in the safety deposit box). But an Ubuntu One account would be great for backing up config files or data you may need while on the road when an unfortunate hardware failure happens. Laterz, "Merch"

Slayer_
Slayer_

Here, evidence, Patch lists for Trine. patch 1.04: * adds Steam Cloud support patch 1.05: * adds failsafes for Steam Cloud (savegames are now always saved locally too)

Threv
Threv

Jason is right if you have ever used the Microsoft Mesh.com service you will see this concept in action. You can even use "the cloud" as a go between to sync two devices without actually storing anything on the Web. (in this case its acting as a master sync DB and file routing agent) Its only problem is the paltry amount of space, (5GB) vs MS own SkyDrive (20GB). Even so the auto syncing of your data files to "the Cloud" and back down to your devices is super handy. While I have my issues with Cloud computing from an enterprise view (Where my data? who do I complain to and get remediation if the "The Cloud" is slow stuff like that). Cloud computing is here to stay for a bit. (Its all back to the Mainframes in the sky and our little dumb terminals 3.0)

kirovs
kirovs

It is amazing how people misinterpret or in some cases misuse the concept of cloud computing. What cloud computing is NOT: 1. Your nuclear proof backup plan 2. Extra external storage Some of the things it is: 1. Easy access to a supercomputing framework for businesses that cannot or are not willing to support one in house. 2. Free USB disks (Ubuntu One). 3. Master sync DB

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Ubuntu uses Likewise (likewise.com) to integrate into Active Directory. Ubuntu 10.04 ships with Likewise Open 5.4. That said, Novell and Microsoft have a tight partnership so Suse is very well integrated with Windows in several ways.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Everything is in the friggin kernel. Why Linux couldn't use a plugin method of kernel's is beyond me. When you install the OS, it installs the plugins you would need for your hardware. No more recompiling the kernel for EVERYTHING. Hell, why do you require different kernel versions for different processors, while you can install Windows 95 on a duel core processor machine without issue (Aside from RAM 768 limit)?

cjshelby
cjshelby

on the Ubuntu forum where I am trying to get help for this issue. I kept it polite and non-critical, just wanted to know how something this basic could get past the beta and RC stages. I had another situation where I was attempting to install a Linux distro lauded for older hardware on an old Toshiba laptop. Couldn't even get it to boot. Someone on the help forum stated that the newer kernel had dropped support for some older IDE interfaces. I'm like WTF??? Then why use the kernel on the distro knowing full well that it's going to give people fits trying to get the thing to work. I think that, just like in other trades, "some" of the folks who write programs and work on developing these distros have just enough knowledge about what they are doing to be dangerous. If you're not one of the "some" then you need not take offense.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Why do no other OS's ever have these stupid issues? Keyboard and mouse not working, the most basic input devices in use for the last 40+ years??? And to think, that's just the start of the stupid issues. I still can't get over how it couldn't even display to my monitor correctly (Mandriva). Causing it to oddly flicker constantly. A basic every day CRT monitor, wouldn't work. Nothing special about it, in Windows it is a "Default Plug and Play" monitor, same as 1000's of other monitors. And yet it couldn't use it properly.

cjshelby
cjshelby

My desktop is currently dead in the water with regard to 10.04 due to the mouse and keyboard freezing at logon. I will definitely not upgrade my laptop (this one) until a permanent fix is found. There are some "quick and dirty fixes" on the forums that involve command line editing of the X-window configuration and the Grub configuration. This indicates to me that no one is sure what is actually causing the problem. If and when I have time I will play around with these. If all else fails I'll just revert to 9.10, which worked flawlessly.

pgit
pgit

I wonder if it would have worked out of the box with ubuntu? I really need to get that testing box back up.

pgit
pgit

Funny thing, I too clicked the "download mp3" link... and it immediately started playing with my mplayer embedded plug in! I would have to right click and 'save as' to actually download. Ain't TR's problem... if'n ya know what I mean =)

jk2001
jk2001

They get a website, write some scripts to sync a directory, and then run that script on all her or his computers (I mean at home and their workstation at work.) The script runs each night, and copies stuff around without user intervention. It's set up to not abuse network bandwidth. The sysadmin is happy because directories are synced. A year later, someone else in the office needs this capability, so the sysadmin does this for someone else. User is happy! Then the boss asks: can we do this for everyone here? And train people too. Uhhhh... That's where the cloud comes in and saves the day. The sysadmin then shifts her or his role to backing up the cloud service to a local disk.

Digital Cowboy
Digital Cowboy

As I said, SuSE goes deeper, but Ubuntu can interact with AD using Likewise. That's my point.

imsoscareed
imsoscareed

Get you facts straight. With Likewise-Open a computer account is created in AD. Nothin more. Ubuntu IS NOT integated with AD. If you want to purchase Likewise (not Likewise-Open) then there is some integration. But guess what? Windows DOES integrate with AD.