iPhone

iPhone 4 antenna flaw: A brief history

The buzz from the iPhone 4 launch has worn off and been replaced by a slew of contradicting reports about the iPhone 4 antenna problems.

The buzz from the launch of the Apple iPhone 4 has officially worn off, and has been replaced with a cacophony of bad press about the iPhone 4's widely-reported antenna problems.

While the effect that this antenna flaw has on everyday usage of the iPhone 4 varies significantly, the story itself has taken on a life of its own and Apple's PR response has been horrendous. As TechRepublic member Palmetto noted, "Denial and evasion are the quickest way to lose the public."

Apple broke the cardinal rule of PR crisis situations by blaming the customers themselves instead of admitting the problem. As a result, the antenna issue has descended into a publicity nightmare.

The situation reached new depths this week as Consumer Reports changed its opinion about the iPhone 4 and recommended that customers avoid buying it solely because of the antenna problems. This set off a further firestorm in the blogosphere, with some pundits excoriating the iPhone 4 while others dismissed the issue as badly over-exaggerated by people who don't know what they're talking about.

To help put this in perspective and get a broader look at the situation, I've put together the links below. The first set shows how the information about the iPhone 4 antenna flaw unfolded, while the second set provides a selection of diverse opinions about the issue from a variety of tech thought leaders.

A chronology, in links

June 24: Reports surface that iPhone 4 loses reception when you hold it by the antenna band (Gizmodo) June 25: Initial response from Steve Jobs and Apple: You're holding it wrong (Ars Technica) June 28: iPhone 4 sales top 1.7 million in three days, 'most successful launch' in company history (Apple) June 30: Anandtech tests conclude iPhone 4 antenna issues are real (Anandtech) July 2: Official message from Apple regarding iPhone 4 antenna issues (Apple) July 6: AppleCare: The iPhone 4 update won't solve the antenna problem (Gizmodo) July 12: Consumer Reports says it can't recommend the iPhone 4 because of the reception problems (Consumer Reports) July 12: Wireless engineer says Consumer Reports iPhone 4 study is flawed (Bob Egan) July 12: Apple deletes Consumer Reports/iPhone 4 threads from its support forums (AppleInsider) July 13: Blogger notes Consumer Reports still rates iPhone 4 as its top smartphone (All Things Digital) July 13: PR experts: iPhone 4 hardware recall Is 'inevitable' (Leander Kahney) July 13: Analyst: iPhone 4 recall would cost $1.5 billion (CNET) July 14: Apple calls iPhone 4 press conference for July 16 (ZDNet) July 15: Report surfaces that Apple engineer warned Jobs about iPhone 4 antenna issue (Bloomberg) July 15: US Senator Schumer writes open letter to Apple requesting free iPhone 4 fix for consumers (AppleInsider) July 16: Apple's 'Antennagate' mea culpa - free case until Sept 30 (ZDNet)

Pundit opinions

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

59 comments
Insuranceman2
Insuranceman2

Thanks for fastidiously documenting the antenna flaw saga-- it's my favorite tech story of the year, because apple was so comically inept at handling the situation. It's nice to see a scuff on Apple's high-polished white-or-black exterior.

danielsweb
danielsweb

Glad i'm moving across to HTC with Android and away from Apple. I'm tired of Apple and their controls.

cbarrows
cbarrows

This is just a collection of links with a synopsis. If I wanted that I'd go to google and search down the information to do the research myself. When you write an article, you present the problem, the details and your conclusion.

abc123a
abc123a

There is no flaw. This is a BS story floated entirely by the media because of a slow news day.

jefferyp2100
jefferyp2100

Steve Jobs is infallible. There is no flaw in the iPhone 4, only a flaw with some users.

coolmark82
coolmark82

Do what I did and just put a grey rubber band over the phone antenna and you're fine! i have the iPhone 4 right now, and besides the iPhone antenna problem which i really don't care about, I am using it as if it was like an iPhone 3Gs. It works flawlessly.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

A) While I agree that CR claimed that they could not recommend the iPhone 4 with a 'thumbs up' icon, they did [i]NOT[/i] say "Do Not Recommend", a totally separate rating marked with a 'thumbs-down' icon. In other words, CR gave it a 'thumbs level' rating of essentially 'good but not great' because of a single 'reported' issue while at the same time giving it better ratings on every technical aspect, including signal reception, than all other tested smart phones. This information is clearly legible by reading CR's own report, [i]linked by Jason as his first July 12 report.[/i] 2) One early commenter made the statement that Steve Jobs sued Microsoft on the 'look and feel' of Windows vs the original MacOS, but Steve Jobs was [i]not[/i] in charge of Apple when that lawsuit began and was fired for arguing with the CEO before that lawsuit even got much publicity. In other words, a critical historical mistake when trying to reference this issue. Quite literally, the pundits and bloggers are doing nothing but amplifying a relatively minor issue way out of proportion, especially since Steve Jobs himself clearly described the way the antenna system was designed and [i]how a narrow insulating band at the lower corner of the body[/i] allowed the iPhone to have essentially three separate external antennas. In other words, anyone with any electrical or electronic skill whatsoever, especially computer techs and radio/phone techs, would know in advance that you wouldn't want to bridge that gap with anything conductive. In all honesty, I, at least, don't hold my iPhone in this so-called 'death grip.' You grab your phone, you normally hold it with your fingers. Rarely does the average person palm their phone so deeply that they would bridge this gap--right handed or left handed. For one reason, the phone is simply too thin front to back to hold it comfortably that way. I can see holding a land line phone like that--even some of the more classic brick-styled cell phones; they're thick and easy to grip. These new phones are so thin by comparison that such a 'death grip' actually increases the risk that you'll drop the phone. Still, the only recommendation I would make to Apple to eliminate this problem is to coat the metal with some kind of insulating epoxy or plastic, effectively preventing direct skin-to-metal contact and eliminating the resistive short human skin creates when bridging that insulating gap.

dpresley_50201
dpresley_50201

Mr. Egan's blog entry makes an excellent point. CR's testing did not make any effort to eliminate the variables that possibly could affect radio reception; the isolation test he proposed does just that. It's probable that the iPhone4 would pass this test with flying colors. Even so, I have another point to add: My experience as an RF technician has taught me that testing in the shop, or lab, and actual performance out in the field can be, and often is, totally different. I would propose someone investigating this issue should have several iPhones in service in various locations and topographies in a given area. Each phone to be performance tested for strength, clarity of signal, and any directionality issues. If every phone performs as reported widely, then the issue is with the phone. If each phone performs differently, such as one or two showing all the symptoms reported, and others performing acceptably, then the issue would be with the coverage of the cellphone service provider IMO. The company I worked for has done this type of testing with two-way radios that test fine in the shop, but don't perform in the field. In most cases, we found that it was repeater coverage to be the source of the problem, even though the repeater was tested to be good as well. Usually, a change in the type of antenna (usually to a "down tilt" type) cleared the issue as the repeater's signal was overshooting the area where our customers were operating. Sometimes the location chosen for the repeater was simply a bad choice and we moved the repeater to a different, better location. The variables that can affect a wireless device's performance makes these kinds of problems very tricky to troubleshoot effectively, and solutions sometimes slow to come by.

yobtaf
yobtaf

When you start taking that guy seriously something's wrong. Have you seen the nature of his comments? Not much to admire there.

trevor
trevor

I do not have one but based on what i am hearing I certainly will not get one. I am very disappointed that Apple did not own up to the problem as I will now be wary of purchasing an Apple product in the future. Toyota admitted errors last year and sorted them out so why not Apple ??

jasondlnd
jasondlnd

How much would it cost Apple? 20 cents per unit? if 4.1 million phones were sold, that'd be about $820,000 to protect their good name. I'd say, worth it.

sboverie
sboverie

The antenna flaw on its own is not as big a deal as the corporate response. The antenna design may look slick but the unintended consequence was that some people short out the antenna by holding it. It does not look good that Apple blamed the users for being clueless or that AT&T messed things up. It really goes downhill when Apple deletes information from their forums. Apple should admit the problem and provide solutions for free. The duct tape fix sounds tacky although workable.

Slartibartfast
Slartibartfast

I've got one. I've tried quite hard to make this problem occuur, it just doesn't. If anything, signal quality (sustaining calls, not just looking at the meter) exceeds the 3GS it replaced, and the 3G before it. Seems like this is yet another overblown criticism of the iPhone. Makes you wonder if there's any lobbying going on here by other interested parties.....

Steve Webb
Steve Webb

Jason's brief history begins in medias res. Let's go back to the beginning: Gizmodo buys a stolen iPhone 4 prototype (during the antenna tests?) and uses extortion against Apple to gain readership. Apple complains to the police, and a criminal investigation commences. Gizmodo attempts to invoke the shield law, even though no one asked Gizmodo to reveal their sources. Other media, hearing "shield law", pile on against Apple. Apple releases the iPhone 4 Gizmodo (where have we heard that name before?) releases a story claiming that the iPhone antenna is flawed. Other media, smelling blood in the water, react like a feeding frenzy. ------------------------ On one level, this is the press following their natural way: kicking the top dog at every opportunity. On another level, this is the press exercising their constitutionally protected freedom and demonstrating "the power of a united press" against a company that attacked one of their own. ------------------------ Can Apple afford to cave in at this point? No. ------------------------ HAPPY DAYS! Apple is "beleaguered", once again! Start the countdown.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

The key word being 'brief'. All articles do not have to fit the format you describe. In some cases, there is no problem. In others, you may ask your readers to reply with their conclusions. Not everything on the web will meet everyone's expectations.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

It sounds like a religious-like defense of the indefensible. The same media with its head in Steve Jobs' lap at every Mac World is all of a sudden anti-Apple? Give me a break!

cpcca
cpcca

It's always amazing to me that Apple supporters have an almost religious zeal in defending the marque - as if the faithful must believe that the chosen one can do no wrong. The truth is that it is insulting for ANY company to tout great design as a core value, then expect their faithful customers to accept failure. I guess using a band-aid, or in this case a rubber band-aid, is OK if you drank the kool-aid but it sends the message to an already arrogant company and CEO that "It's OK to fail and we will pay you and support you even if you compromise your core values and lie to us about it." Just another case of corporate abuse of power. No thanks! CC

dpresley_50201
dpresley_50201

Rubber bands are cheap. Even so, I believe Apple needs to provide a more durable solution to this issue with the antenna. The fact that the antenna can be bridged by touching it is a problem that needs to be dealt with. Well, Apple is not Motorola. In my experience in dealing with Motorola (I worked for a Motorola dealership for eleven years), the solution to this issue would be shipping right now if they made the phone. I've always loved the way Motorola supported the techs and customers who serviced and purchased their products. I wish Apple would give the same support.

M.W.H.
M.W.H.

When I read the CR article, it appears to me that the reason the iPhone 4 ends up being rated highly is simply due to the high scores it got on other aspects of design and performance. It might be more useful to their readership if they were to weigh the individual scores differently. If Toyota builds it's next Lexus to perform magnificently in all areas except for the fact that they put square wheels on it, do they deserve to be recommended just because the unweighted score is high? In Canada we have a consumer protection concept called 'suitability for purpose' implying that a judge can award damages if s/he feels that a product is so poorly designed as to render it unsuitable for the purpose for which it was sold. By the way, how else would a thinking person interpret "Due to this problem, we can't recommend the iPhone 4" in any other way except to mean that they can't recommend the iPhone 4? And another thing... Apple has made it's living by marketing to non-techies so why do you excuse their blunder by saying that "anyone with any electrical or electronic skill whatsoever, especially computer techs and radio/phone techs, would know in advance that you wouldn't want to bridge that gap with anything conductive". What an arrogant and ridiculous statement!

melias
melias

"2) One early commenter made the statement that Steve Jobs sued Microsoft on the 'look and feel' of Windows vs the original MacOS, but Steve Jobs was not in charge of Apple when that lawsuit began and was fired for arguing with the CEO before that lawsuit even got much publicity. In other words, a critical historical mistake when trying to reference this issue." Other arguements remain.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

It sounds to me like Apple was trying to do exactly this when the prototype got 'lifted' and ended up at Gizmodo. Of course, the result of this event was to recall all the prototypes that were out and try to recover the one from Giz. This also means that testing got cut off maybe before this type of issue might have been discovered. As a former RF technician myself, if you can't prevent the contact, insulate it. Reception with the external antenna has definitely proven superior--but when you make an idiot-proof device, all you get are better idiots. Don't you agree?

Zwort
Zwort

The argumentum ad hominem is no substitute for tackling the issues; IOW, shooting the arguer does not deal with the presenting problem. Moreover, it is tacky.

Jellimonsta
Jellimonsta

Please add something constructive, or at least humorous to the forum. Otherwise, don't go away mad. Just go away! :p ;) ;\

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

By simply hammering a wedge in to disable a friction brake you're only delaying a problem, not repairing it. All it would take is for one of those wedges to slip and either jam the pedal entirely or fall out and allow the brake to again prevent the pedal from retracting and you would have another runaway car or truck. A bandage is not a repair. That said, I do believe Apple was surprised by the problem, at least to some extent, believing that few people would hold their phones so tightly while using it. What they may not have realized is that its thin shape tends to feel slippery and fragile enough that users might grip it so to keep from dropping it. Of course, I think that kind of grip actually makes dropping it more likely, not less. The question really ends up being: is this issue really as big as the bloggers and pundits are making it sound, or is it a small thing that's been so blown out of proportion that the truth will never be known? Apple is not known for being reactionary. My guess is that they're trying to discover a real fix and keeping their mouths shut until they can truly resolve the issue. But any individual who sees a favorite project get panned as badly as this one has been would get upset and snap off an inappropriate comment if confronted. Steve Jobs is no different from any of the rest of us--he just happens to have more talent than some of us.

AstroCreep
AstroCreep

Apparently the bumper cases aren't a "Complete" solution; some people still experience the problem even when a bumper is installed.

ITOdeed
ITOdeed

Apple fanbois are religiously fanatical about their Apple products, and they will not let Apple cave in to the insults of the unenlightened. :-) It's time we stopped blaming AT&T for Apple's shortcomings.

iphone 4s
iphone 4s

the funniest thing was when my work mate bought one. He never wanted an iphone but he finally got and this news was released couple weeks later.

Zwort
Zwort

A number of variables are involved, and it will probably only become clear after an exhaustive survey is carried out. Among the variables are skin potential (as TR posters have noted there is electrical conductance across the hands, most particularly when 'emotional sweating takes place', particularly on the index finger and half the finger next to it), carrier - AT&T seem to be a problem here, and in the UK perhaps TMobile, since they use a lower frequency which does not penetrate solid objects very well - and the way in which users hold the 'phone. I for example always use my left hand, leaving the right free for writing, opening doors, and so on. These are some of the variables, and they have nothing to do with lobbying, as the lab tests clearly showed.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

I noted that there are "contradicting reports about the iPhone 4 antenna problems" in the description to this article. In places where AT&T coverage is very strong, most people don't notice any problems, but in places where AT&T coverage is weak or inconsistent, these antenna problems are easier to replicate and result in dropped calls and reduced bandwidth. It's a real issue, but there is a vast range in the ways that iPhone 4 experience it and are affected by it.

yobtaf
yobtaf

It thrives on this kind of distortion. And Letterman is their stooge.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

'Cave in' to whom? Their customers who perceive their new phones as defective?

trueRF
trueRF

While I am not defending apple in any way for the flawed engineering that lets the human touch the antenna there are issues with this problem. As the Iphone and all other "smart" phones are multi band and anecdotal comments on the comparative performance do not state which bands are in use at the time of the "test" then these tests are flawed. If you are using your phone on 3G @2.1GHz or @900MHz or @850MHz the results will be completely different. Likewise if you are using your phone for voice on GSM on various frequency bands you will get differing results. Even the video claiming to be using a reputable company to do the tests is rather dubious as they did not mention this very obvious fact. If you live in an area with only 850-900MHz signal then chances are you will not have any problem.

yobtaf
yobtaf

I've had my iPhone 4 for a day now and guess what? Not one problem! I have to admit that it's in a case, but I was going to do that anyway. No Bluetooth problem either. Sorry to disappoint so many out there who have never even one in the wild but know what a piece of crap it is.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

I can see the new Apple ads saying, "Holding a phone to your face is sooooo uncool." The trendy Starbucks-drinking twinks that purchase Apple products will lap it up.

Jasonjb1222
Jasonjb1222

Quickly and briefly. It's an engineering flaw. Antenna in the bottom left, relly cool. Antenna on the right side. Really cool. Together, you have bunny ears, like an old TV set. And it is supposed to give you better reception. What everyone seems to forget, is the body has a natural resistance. Usually between 3 and 5 ohms. you can test this by holding an OHM meter in both hands and testing your bodies natural resistance. Give it to your wife, sister, brother, etc. and this value will change. So, it is normal that not everyone has the EXACT same problem with the phone. When holding the bottom left, you naturally need to hold it with your right hand as well. What that does, is a close a circuit between 2 independant circuits PLUS add your natural resistance in the middle. The result... Well, everyone seems to be crying about it. So, if APPLE does not want to go back to the drawing board and admit their engineers made a HUGE amateur RF booboo... Than either live with a bad product or don't buy one. Toyota anyone? Where is the FCC when someone needs them to be regulating this?

TheBlueGoose
TheBlueGoose

I do not think that the flaw is a super serious problem but Apple's response to the problem so far is a much more serious issue, for Apple... If I were a customer of Apple and I was told that in order to fix a issue with their product was to hold it differently or buy an additional product. I would be bit put off. I would most likely return the product as defective and then purchase another manufacturers similar device and move on. For Apple's sake I hope that I am a minority in my thoughts on this.

melias
melias

I know many will disagree with me, but... If I pay about $200 for a phone, and it kicks out on me because of the way I hold it, that's BS. If I decided in part to pay about $200 for an iPhone because of it's sleek, 'sexy' look, then a cheap crappy bumper/case is just more BS. Steve Jobs needs to get his head straight and do what's right. Remember, this is the person that sued everyone and his brother for 'look and feel' back in the day, so "if you can't take the heat, you shouldn't have dished it." (yeah, paraphrased)

WebTek2
WebTek2

My son has used the iPhone 4 for several weeks and states he has no issues with the Antenna, reception or dropped calls. However, I am appalled at Jobs response that consumers are "holding it wrong". What a crock. If users are having a problem, It's a design flaw plain and simple. Fix it Steve!!! The iPhone 3 doesn't have this issue.

dpresley_50201
dpresley_50201

People do use things ways not intended for them. It is hard to see holding the iPhone4 without touching the antenna ring around the case, so it should be insulated, or isolated somehow. If grounding the antenna with your finger is the actual culprit in this case, then Apple is obligated to provide the correction, no questions, or complaints. Honestly, Apple sounds like the "Big Three" American car makers in the recent past in their responses to this issue -- "Not our fault, the customer is using it wrong." No excuses not to make an engineering correction when necessary.

david
david

The latest from the Feds is that most of the Toyota problems were due to driver error. But Toyota admitted they had a problem (eventually). Current indications are that Apple has a problem but didnt admit it. Score one for Toyota, nil for Apple. Giving one free, cheap bumper to customers a better way to go. But frankly, most people will buy the phone simply cos it looks so cool.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"But any individual who sees a favorite project get panned as badly as this one has been would get upset and snap off an inappropriate comment if confronted. Steve Jobs is no different from any of the rest of us--he just happens to have more talent than some of us." Jobs is a CEO, and not for the first time either. He should know better by now than to toss off ill-considered remarks in front of the press. He IS different from the rest of us - he gets paid an enormous amount of money to know how to conduct himself before the media.

Zwort
Zwort

...life extenders might be the solution, not that Apple can afford to fork out. I put a link up from a UK retailer, Morgan ISTR, who tout their device as suitable. That way both the aerial and the battery life are extended, by a device that looks like a bumper case. Hey, and maybe the device is less fragile. Bigger though.

mike.motes
mike.motes

it's the higher frequencies that don't penetrate as well. 800 MHz has better penetration than 1900 MHz. The higher up in the spectrum you go, the more it becomes line-of-sight.

kevin.stafferton
kevin.stafferton

I saw that top ten and I laughed, even though I own an iPhone 4. But Letterman was making jokes about a topical new story. He would have done the same had it been a Android or any other phone. Yes, I have discovered that if I hold it in my left hand low down on the body, I do lose reception so I try to remember to hold it higher up (or stop holding it wrong!). There are quite a few other little annoyances I have with the phone, but they are far outweighed by how much of a joy the phone is to use. Basically, I don't want a product recall because I like my phone. Although a free bumper would be nice. The above makes me sound like an Apple fanboy, but this is actually the first Apple product I've ever owned. I've never even had an iPod before which I've always considered too expensive for what they are. So take from that what you like.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Letterman even knows that TechRepublic is part of the same company. :-) There's no distortion here. The issue is quite real. However, as I noted in another post, some users are crippled by it and others barely notice a difference -- mostly depending on how strong the AT&T signal is in their area. Also, remember that the iPhone 4 antennas and upgraded mobile hardware/software can actually produce some nice gains (as TechRepublic recently reported): iPhone 4 upgrades to HSDPA/HSUPA can double 3G bandwidth speeds http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=5202

mike.motes
mike.motes

the specific frequencies, which I neglected to do. My BlackBerry is a "Quad-band" phone (and since I don't have an iPhone, I don't know if it is 3 or 4 band). The 1.9Ghz band is so close to the 2.1, the results there will be quite similar as will be the 850 and 900 MHz. But a marked difference between UHF and microwave. Cheers!

iphone 4s
iphone 4s

You would be suprised how many things have changed today. It seems like apple is not what it used to be 2 or 3 years ago. HTC rules the world now and apple is falling behind. I sounds cruel but apple's nightmare is becoming a reality. Look at the new iphone. It has nothing special but a few new rubbish functions. http://www.bidbeat.cz

mike.motes
mike.motes

While the resistance of the body does vary between individuals, it is much more complex than resistance. It has to do with impedance, frequency, and the SAR (Specific Absortion Rate) of the human body. Without having to go into the math, bottom line is this: at the frequencies involved, the human body will absorb a portion of the signal from ANY phone. Place the antenna in a location where your body can actually come in contact with the antenna, you change the impedance of the antenna reducing its efficiency. Finally, place the antenna at the lowest point of radiation possible in the device, you have a tragic engineering fiasco. Yup, they really messed up this one! The FCC does regulate design of wireless devices. But only to the point of permissible emissions from a device, not how "good" it is. That is beyond the scope of their charter, so to speak. It is better to let the free marketplace decide that factor (if it's bad, no one will continue to use it). If no one continues to use it, then either go out of business or fire the engineers that obviously didn't think of real-world usage, and get it right the next time.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

The latest from the Feds is that most of the Toyota ACCIDENTS were due to driver error. The Feds looked at 'black box' recordings indicating the drivers were pushing the accelerator pedal instead of the brake. The Feds didn't look at data for vehicles that may have been accelating on their own but were not involved in accidents.

Juanita Marquez
Juanita Marquez

Prudent CEOs are hired for their conduct as well as their vision to drive an existing company. These people are expected to put on a good face. Self-made CEOs often have no such restraint, or feel the need for it, as their skills were inventing a successful product and building up a business around that product, not necessarily the art of tact. Jobs falls into this category. He knows that no matter what HE says, as long as his products are good and innovative, they will sell. People buy Apple for the cachet and desired functionality, in spite of (or because of) the well-known snark of its CEO.

Zwort
Zwort

Yeah, probably so. I should know better from my past; Brit cold war submarines (and probably modern ones) used VLF to maintain contact via Rugby, and a place in Wales. Tsk. My neighbour who misled me ought to know better, being from the senior service. I've just spent the past hour or two driving through blackspots, and going into buildings where reception is likewise. Fortunately the discreet 'bip' on my headset is not annoying, though the service is. I'm going to unlock it and put my Vodafone SIM card in. I've had enough of the problem. Anyhow, the point was to address the little T-Mobile logo that I saw on an iPhone in the welter of URLs that has been thrown back and forth, in various fora. It would seem that Apple have a penchant for patchy service providers. It's a shame really. I actually had a hankering for an iPhone, and might well have bought one this time around. Perhaps I'll wait awhile. Or buy a second hand one.

Zwort
Zwort

If the animal analogies do hold, then this is a case of feeding tofu to carnivores. ;-) Advertisers? What advertisers? I don't see them with my ad blocking software. Not even the Evul Empire Google gets past it. Oddly Tech Rep has a tendency to recommend the stuff. :-0

yobtaf
yobtaf

Anyway, you report this stuff. Don't you ever feel like you're throwing red meat to zoo animals sometimes to watch the feeding frenzy. And doesn't CNET benefit with the advertisers when the traffic goes up? Oh well it's a job.

trueRF
trueRF

The Iphone4 is quad band for both GSM and UMTS 3G. But not identical 850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz for UMTS and 850, 900, 1900, 1800 MHz GSM. 2100MHz is close to 2500MHz used in microwave ovens. That frequency was chosen for its heating/absorption properties for meat/flesh etc. so of course 2100MHz will be affected by hands for all phones. Makes you wonder about all those people who spend all day with bluetooth devices on their ears which operate at 2500MHZ. Everyone complains about cellphone radiation but nothing is said about bluetooth earpieces.

Jasonjb1222
Jasonjb1222

I didn't want to get into the too many details either or the Math. But thanks for clarifying and building upon. The exposed antenna, the impedance of the body, etc. Overall, bad engineering. Cheers.

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