Smartphones

Is Apple losing its cool factor with techies?

Apple made inroads with IT pros and tech-savvy consumers in the past few years, but recent events have chipped away at those gains, according to a new survey.

Apple used to be viewed largely as a brand for artists and visual thinkers. However, in recent years Apple has made major gains with the tech crowd as the MacBook Pro has become the Mercedes of laptops, the iPhone has become the most popular platform for mobile software developers, and the iPad has launched a new computing form factor of touch-based tablets.

But, there's evidence that Apple is losing some of its luster with techies. The company's stubborn refusal to support Adobe Flash (which wins props with some IT pros but breaks a lot of Web sites), its draconian and ambiguous review policy for the App Store, and it's strong-arm legal tactics with HTC and Gizmodo are having a negative impact on how young, tech-savvy professionals view Apple, according to YouGov's BrandIndex.

Philip Elmer-DeWitt of Fortune explains:

"The index tracks the 'buzz' of some 850 consumer brands - including Apple - by interviewing 5,000 people every weekday and asking them 'If you've heard anything about the brand in the last two weeks, was it positive or negative?' Scores can range from 100 to -100. As the chart above shows, Apple's buzz with the key 18- to 24-year-old demographic reached its 2010 peak on March 18 with a score of 80.2. Since the start of April it's been cooling off, and on Thursday it stood at 66.1."

Here's the chart:

Here's a video clip of The New York Times' Nick Bilton and ABC's John Berman discussing the report and the issue of Apple losing it's cool factor:

Also, after admitting that he's an avid Apple customer, John Stewart of The Daily Show recently mocked Apple for its treatment of Gizmodo [WARNING: This video clip has strong language]:

Of course, we also got news this week that Apple's Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC 2010) sold out in just eight days, so it appears that there may be more software developers jumping on the bandwagon than are jumping off.

In other news, a report from IDC showed Apple's iPhone made a major surge in global market share in smartphones in the first quarter. The report showed Apple is now third in global shipments of smartphones with 16.1% share (up from 10.9% a year ago). After seeing the report, my colleague Larry Dignan, ZDNet Editor in Chief, predicted, "Apple is going to catch RIM for that No. 2 global spot in smartphones. Give it 3 quarters max." Part of Apple's strength in smartphones has to do with the fact that IT departments and businesses are getting more comfortable supporting or even deploying iPhones.

The bottom line is that there are conflicting signals about Apple's perception among IT leaders and tech-savvy business professionals. Where do you stand? Take our poll and then join the discussion below.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

196 comments
colecrew
colecrew

No respective Techie would have anything to do with most of Apple's products. Apple took an open source OS and customized it to fit specific devices. They did a good thing by giving the masses of technologically challenged people a simple device to use. For the techies there is Linux and Windows. OSs that actually work on more than Apples limited hardware platforms. The devices that apple actually did create (ipod, touch, and ipad) are good entertainment devices.

digidash
digidash

And I tend to agree. Here are my comments: Last job: IBM came in with whiz-bang software that ONLY "their [highly-paid] consultants could configure and make work." After a couple iterations, newer patches to the o/s, their stuff stopped working. Our company paid on the order of $25,000 JUST for the software - not counting the high-paid consulting that had to be brought ON-SITE, because they (IBM) did not know how their software worked - and the consultant, actually a former co-worker of mine, flubbed it; so they got us both together and, only with my help, was he able to make it work. He was "shooting in the dark" and guessing at configurations and settings, and FINALLY admitted he could not make it work by himself. About 4 weeks later, our major music-industry giant decided to just "dump" the software and write it off! Same company - Same issue with the infamous "mainframe" - as the other poster so astutely pointed out, some manager and a legacy employee have a lust for the mainframe, since that is all they knew at the time, so, because of that, we had to maintain triple databases, for ONE SINGLE APPLICATION, a simple database app that looks up artist name and artist works! This required us to maintain DB2 (and the associated mainframe system) as well as Oracle and SQL, because the "old-timers" don't want to let go of their ONE MAINFRAME APPLICATION, we had to maintain EXPENSIVE additional staff, instead of the logical move of converting off the old legacy mainframe application (basically a simple database lookup) to Windows-based or Linux-based Oracle or even to SQL-plus or mysql. There were FOURTEEN MAINFRAMERS to FOUR WINDOWS admins! Figure out the cost savings on that! AND it made Disaster Recovery testing MUCH MORE EXPENSIVE, because the mainframe had to be duplicated and "specially-configured" to make everything work! Instead, why not take approximately 120 hours and 8 people and convert this one application from mainframe to Linux or Windows Oracle? Then there are the political implications of cutting (terminating) those 14 people; and that was a HUGE part of it! But if you want to run a "business," you can't just keep assenting to these "hangers-on" who refuse to adapt to newer technologies! Heck, even this company's Citrix farm runs only ONE LEGACY APPLICATION (basically a "sales contact tracking system" [customer relationship stuff] like "Act" or "Business Contact Manager." That one app easily could be converted and then installed on the 130 desktops, instead of having to maintain an entire suite of servers and an admin specifically for that ONE (16-bit [!!!]) APPLICATION! The vendor long since ceased to care about that one app, and never planned; nor plans, any move to 32-bit or higher! The app is based on some old 16-bit app development environment along the lines of DBASE III and FoxPro; the app/environment is called SAGE. With the current company: IBM tried at least once here to make "IBM Director" work, after the on-site admins realized it was a BEHEMOTH to configure and required/requires a PhD in physics to understand - RESULT? FLUBBED! IBM was unable to make it work! They allegedly couldn't exactly explain why; and don't really have any good case studies of their "IBM Director" product working anywhere, but... "It's a WONDERFUL concept." (clears throat - ahem). Their own engineers and highly-paid consultants allegedly admitted they did not know exactly how all the pieces needed to fit together.

jtreepro
jtreepro

Apple is always going to be Apple, and us Maccers don't really care if you "techies" buy into it, or not. It's a better platform. PERIOD. Get OVER it, and continue to live in a substandard world... Apple "following" Microsoft? LMFAO! As if! Apple is MS's R&D Department! No, I don't have "disposable income," but I'm still using machines I bought from Apple over 10 years ago... And they all work REALLY WELL!

msspurlock2
msspurlock2

They have Al Gore on their board. That tells you all you need to know about how totally CLUELESS Apple is. No wonder the Droid is kicking iPhone's ass. It was designed by people with common sense.

stv7575
stv7575

I started on a mac in 1998 & went to a PC in 2001 I have 1 word 1 click moues. & now no flash whats next ? maybe the Steve net. So you only see what Apple thinks is OK for you .

major.malfunction
major.malfunction

The reality is that the only people who think Apple is great are people who have disposable income. THIS MEANS YOU! Sorry, but there isn't ONE blue collar working class individual/family that is buying Apple crap other than maybe an iPod and even that is falling down as soon as people realize that they are forever tethered to the Apple/iTunes store. I am in NO WAY against Apple's technology. I actually think their stuff is neat and this is coming from a 20+ yr tech geek with an MCSE! The problem with thier stuff is that its RIDICULOUSLY over priced. I have friends and family ask me all the time about what PC or laptop to buy and they mention about getting an Apple. I tell them to go right ahead for you will get a fantastic product if you do. Then they come back after their trip to the Apple store and are like "HOLY CRAP! The cheapest thing in there is like $1000 and once you total up the add-ins, you can't get a PC or laptop from there for under $1500!!!!". Same thing in the tech world. ANY business user that relies on an iPhone for the corporate email I can guarantee that the only reason they have it is because their company paid for it. Otherwise, it falls back to my original statement that anyone with an iPhone, iPad, or Mac basically has disposable income and nothing better to spend it on. Get married, buy a house, and have some kids....then come back and tell me how we all should be buying Apple products ;)

lgarbarini
lgarbarini

I agree, I know several friends who have new apple products, who in previous years remained very loyal, but are now jail-breaking their Ipod Touches and IPhones...

mark.mccormick
mark.mccormick

You really need to get rid of your Anti-Apple bias at TechRepublic. Of all the issues to write about in the tech world, you come up with this non-story, based on a fluctuating chart of public opinion (look at where the chart was in January - much lower than it is now!). Start treating Apple with the same deference that you do Microsoft/Windows, and you just might keep me as a subscriber.

globalmac
globalmac

Steve Jobs is a tyrant and crApple SUX!! If you paid money for that Linux-rip-off crap then you deserve the high interest you're still paying on that overpriced, everything-including-the-keyboard is proprietary junk!

JCitizen
JCitizen

John got it right, I'm afraid!!

cbellur
cbellur

We don't use any Apple products at my employer, but seeing as how Microsoft didn't have a viable OS since XP (which was 8 or so years ago), I went out and bought a Mac Pro. I love the thing -- it is rock solid, hasn't crashed once, and is fast as can be. Then I bought a relative a Mac Mini for Christmas, and I am amazed at how fast such a small machine is. There are very good things about controlling the hardware and OS. That said, they've taken it a bit too far. I was planning on learning some RIA technologies, and FLEX was top of my list. Now seeing them go after Flash, it has me in a bit of a quandary. I'm sticking with what I feel is safe to learn -- the Spring/Hibernate AOP stack, which seems to have plenty of opportunities in my area. Sure, it's back-end stuff, and it can work with FLEX/Flash applications. Interestingly enough, I was planning a tip on the BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) and I noticed their site has a developer's area. They provide access to their schedule and some other tools so developers can create apps around the BART data. All of the apps are for OS X or the iPhone. No one developed a Windows app. This may not be surprising, considering Cupertino is so near SF (but not on the BART line). It's a tough call for those who want to learn new technologies. You can put your toes in the water, but jumping in and dedicating your free time to learning something that may be as useful as Latin? Yikes. And what if you learn how to make an iPhone app (not that hard, which is nice) and put forth an effort to make one, and the app store rejects it? That actually happened to a friend of mine. He's a long time Apple fan and he's pissed as can be, and they're really losing people with this totalitarian crap they're doing.

bitdoctor
bitdoctor

[One person posted about Apple failing to investigate incidents of Payment Card fraud - what are your thoughts, if Apple is ignoring such fraud for the greater "profit" motive?] I agree with the poster that Apple should investigate and fix the fraud issue! In such cases, be sure and report it also to your local authorities, to Visa or MC - whomever is your credit card provider - and to FCC and FTC, as well as the Attorney General of your state. You, and the folks with the fb page can band together and initiate a class-action suit against Apple - like the whole "cheapo 1st Generation iPod suit" (I got my $35 out of that one! - they had the 1st ones with such cheapo screens that they scratched if you BREATHE on them [only a slight exaggeration]). PLUS, Apple MUST CONFORM TO "PAYMENT CARD INDUSTRY" (PCI) Compliance standards, and if they (or their partner credit card gateway processor) are failing to investigate such fraud, then be sure and let the PCI Industry and Visa/MC folks know - and they can fine apple either per incident or otherwise! Actually, they (PCI & Visa/MC) can shut down the Apple Store completely for PCI non-compliance - if they find these incidents to be factual, and Apple to be at fault and/or non-compliant.

dslovejoy
dslovejoy

People who buy Apple computers seem to have an elevated opinion of themselves and think that they are better than others because they buy an apple. Steve Jobs perpetuates that image with his draconian policies regarding "his" products.

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

That said, Jobs has become the new [evil] dictator.

tutor4pc
tutor4pc

Cool is the most stupid word there is. It describes nothing at all. It may be used as a sentiment indicator but people who use the word cannot explain what it really means. As a techie who was member of a computer club before apple existed I go for function and not sentiment. I am secure in myself and do not have to prove my "cool" by buying overpriced, technically limited proprietary gadgets. Because of that proprietary nature products are good for non-techies but I never owned an apple product because of all the limitations. Yes, apple does some nice things and sports good designs in the heritage of the German Braun company design of the fifties and sixties. I feel sorry for the "cool" crowd. All they have is their belief.

bryan_es
bryan_es

I've got one; I like it. But I don't put anything sensitive data on it. Not only (and quite ironically) does Apple's closed source/big brotherish software development make Microsoft look like Linux but users are finding that the only reason Apple had a good security record is because they commanded a miniscule market share. People don't write malware for .00000000000000001% of the market. Now that they have market share, people are owning them. They don't need the source to find holes. Go figure, the security by obscurity model slightly works when you are obscure. If Apple doesn't fix the device encryption and implement more Active Sync integration, I think they will find their butts kicked in the business market which means all they can sell is cool toys. As soon as they cease being cool, they'll drop back into obscurity. Seems like we've been here before...

sgreen
sgreen

I have a Kindle and love it. If Apple gives free WWAN I'll put my Kindle away and get a Apple Tablet and wait for the Droid, then repeat!

truckingal
truckingal

. is definitely un-cool! I'm no techie, and have never seen a benefit to me in using Apple products given the price differential. However a recent experience has put Apple forever on the crap-list for me. I purchased one video download several months ago from iTunes for an article I was writing. Two weeks ago, I checked my bank statement only to find multiple charges (the smallest being $40) against my bank card for iTunes. Within three days, and continuing AFTER I contacted iTunes-and received a reply,the mounting charges reached $600! In checking, I find this has happened to thousands of people over a period of years, often for over $1500 each. Apple's answer is, "not our problem!" It certainly IS their problem-something is wrong in their system and is being continually hacked for card numbers.Speculation is that iTunes gift cards are being purchased and then sold on the street for cash. Apple refuses to investigate ip addys of the downloads, addresses, etc-they just keep collecting the $$ they generate from someone's fraud using their weak, un-corked system! Now, they are giving my bank fits over refunding the charges! This may or may not be entirely Apple's fault, however it's been going on for years with no response. There's even a Facebook page trying to force Apple to step up to their responsibilities and fix their security. No luck! A company that lacks the corporate responsibility to secure their systems doesn't deserve business from ANY of us! Their arrogance is breathtaking!

jgeith
jgeith

Remembering back to the old hammer through the screen commerical, they have met the enemy and it is them. They have become exactly what they warned us about.

bimjimmy
bimjimmy

In case the "techies" don't know it yet, Flash has a fear factor in it. There are (a few) programmers out there who have re-wired the Flash engine with malicious routines, put it on a non-Adobe site, then call the unofficial Flash from the web page. From there the call runs the hacking routines, installing viruses, Trojans and other routines on users' computers at will. Flash is great for pimply-faced artists/programmers who want to show off. For serious business sites it's a pain in the butt... serious people who want to buy goods or get information don't want to waste their time waiting for "amazing" graphics to play, they want to get on with their business and move on to other priorities. Flash does have a place in presentations and demonstrations, but very little else. IMHO, with it possibly being such a danger to a user's computer security, Apple is right not to support it. Unless, of course, every user is also willing to scan a web page for the Flash engine's source address BEFORE they run it - which is impossible, since Flash runs the routine as soon as you load the page.

sonicsteve
sonicsteve

However They lost their cool for me a while ago when I saw how restrictive they became. I use PC, linux and windows because it's flexible. Apple is the exact other end of the spectrum.

kevinlovegrove
kevinlovegrove

Can say this in three words. Microsoft Exchange support.

bimjimmy
bimjimmy

My 82-year-old lawyer Dad still uses ONLY a Mac. When I got into computers, I started in TI, Commodore, Amiga, then bought a Mac (almost had to get a mortgage). For programming training, however, it was back to PCs, and there I stay. I had great respect for Apple - do it right the first time, make it easy to use, and not worry (too much) about hackers and viruses. Leaving the Motorola chip behind, using PC architecture, and the piecemeal launch of the iPad has changed all that... suddenly, amid the hype the new (still expensive) product has come out missing MOST of the hardware a user needs to make life easy, and Apple is already showing that they intended from the start to milk that vacuum for all they can - the iPad is barely out of the box and Apple is already indicating that the next version will have one or two more hardware features. In other words, Apple made the iPad v.1 obsolete the first day it was sold. Soaking customers was never seen as an Apple trait before, but that's the way I see the company now... I think they are counting on their loyal Smurfs to keep buying their latest versions every time they come on the market, and propping up their bottom line. IMHO the iPhone took Apple to new highs... but the design and marketing behind the iPad is taking them to new lows.

Charlie III
Charlie III

I won't buy another iPhone too much hassle syncing with outlook

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

It seems that too many people think that the reason the iPod/iPhone/iPad are cool because it look neat. Well, I can't argue that on the average I think Apple's computers have been among the best looking machines on the market in the last 12 years. The iMac in particular has demonstrated that you don't need a massive chunk of aluminum and steel standing on or under your desk to have a good computing experience. I'll grant that the newer towers have become much better looking than the old 'beige box' designs, but they're still chunky enough that you have to hide them under your desk or occupy desktop space that could be better utilized by a graphics pad or mousing surface. Yes, I even include the Mac pro in this complaint. However, Apple's 'cool' hasn't been all about looks, though some zealots focus on looks alone. Apple's cool has been more about how it works. When you listened to kids talking about their iPods or iPhones, it wasn't, "Hey! That's a cool-looking music player!" but rather "How does it work? Oh, hey, that's neat!" In other words, the cool factor was the functionality, not the appearance. Back when the iMac first came to market, nearly everybody tried to copy its style in one way or another. In fact, I know of at least one almost-identical twin to the first-gen iMacs that was produced by eMachines, if I remember correctly. However, this 'cool' appearance didn't help sales any, even though iMac sales more than doubled the previous years sales of all Mac models combined. On the other hand, the iMac simply changed how things were done. Apple standardized all their IO into one of two different connections, USB and Firewire. It suddenly became so easy to set up a computer that anybody, even your grandmother, could do it. This was Cool. Then we came to the MP3 player. Again, there were already a number of products on the market, Creative one of the most notable--but they weren't really selling. Apple came out with the iPod--a chunky, white, ungainly looking beast with only one button and one 'click-wheel' control. It sure didn't look cool, but it worked more easily than anything else on the market. You could find your music very quickly through its menu system and ability to truly scroll down the listings and with the ability to quickly and easily change the playlists through your computer with iTunes, it became the easiest MP3 player to use across the board. That was Cool! The iPhone, again, was not the first, but again, because Apple made it so simple to use that a 3-year-old toddler could find games and play them, the Smartphone market was blown out of its old, staid, enterprise-only fortress. Apple made the Smartphone something everybody wanted, not just the techies and the corporate managers. And that's the point: Cool isn't how something looks, but rather how it works in the perceptions of the target market. Apple has effectively regenerated the consumer electronics market with things people WANT to use, not things they HAVE to use. That is what Cool is.

jfuller05
jfuller05

Apple was for arthouse goons :^0. Just kidding. I knew this would happen though. Apple was the "underdog" company, so naturally, people that get into underdogs were going to love Apple. Then, Apple gets mainstream and, naturally, the underdog fans have become disenchanted with Apple.

asaverio
asaverio

Real IT guys never, NEVER, use Apple.

Mr. Tinker
Mr. Tinker

As a 30 yr techie - Apple had a "cool factor" with me once upon a time....when I could run Windows 3.0 and 3.1 in a window. But the cost of that factor was unjustified. (The replacement floppy disk drive cost $145.00 from Apple and was no different than the $35.00 drive from the local PC store.) THAT'S when Apple lost its luster for me. I hate being ripped off.

fjp
fjp

Mercedes doesn't have the brand image it used to, either!

alextepes
alextepes

I've never used Apple's devices period, they over price everything they sell which can be built or bought ridiculously cheaper if a "techie" knew anything. I've been a techie for a good 10 years and I haven't bought an apple device and won't start any time soon.

skykeys
skykeys

Tech discussions of this type always come down to religious-like arguements: my god is better than your god. There is no agreement, which usually means that both sides of the arguement have (partial) merit. However, one thing that we can all agree on (anyone who has experienced IBM that is), is that IBM software sucks. I know; I used to work for IBM software. Terribly complex, convoluted stuff. They ruined Lotus, and now have ruined Rational. WebSphere is a joke; it's so amazingly complex to use. I have to hand it to IBM though, they seem to know how to extract money from customers better than anyone. Their software stinks, but their sales force is top notch.

Hazydave
Hazydave

Shut up, you dirty Vikings!

vucliriel
vucliriel

I got a 16 year old Thinkpad still running WfWG 3.11, a 12 year old Toshiba running Windows 95 and my 10 year old desktop running windows 98 and THEY ALL WORK PERFECTLY! My only reason for upgrading has NEVER been the OS, but rather, IMPROVED HARDWARE. Therefore Macs, because of Apple's outrageous pricing policies have never been part of the picture (although I did hesitate a few years ago when the Macs started to use Intel processors, believing there was now hope to bypass their gestapo-like MCP (Marketing Control Program, ;) ) What we have seen in the past 6-8 years from Microsoft is a great part of the reason why, IMO, people are disenchanted with the PC platform and its new strong arm user controls. Combine that with naive first timers fooled by Apple's Snow-White-like poisonous marketing (isn't it uncanny that so many people are fooled by Apple's sneaky marketing just like in the story?) and you get your new Apple demographic right there... Both my kids have been on Macs due to their mother's being a first generation computer artist and let me tell you... Both are disenchanted with the platform after finding out it's got limitations, just as PCs have... And who do you think their mother calls when she has computer problems for which there is no Apple solution?! That's right, the PC nerd Ex will save the day...

Slayer_
Slayer_

I got some 20 year old machines still running Windows 95, and they are 1000's of times more stable than their Mac counterparts.

cjshelby
cjshelby

Couldn't have said it better myself. I have my Asus laptop, My Sansa and my Samsung flip phone. I get done what I need to get do on the laptop, enjoy my tunes in my car with my Sansa, and make and recieve phone calls perfectly with my basic flip phone. My bills are all paid on time, I have no credit card debt or IRS liens. My kids are fed and clothed, I own my home, and we can afford an occasional vacation. If you can afford your "Apple Toys" then by all means, squander YOUR money to your heart's content. If a MacBook and an I Phone has your personal priority over life's true rewards, so be it. I'm reminded of the 1980's when I lived in LA. People with 70,000 dollar cars living in run down apartments, while people like me drove Nissans and owned 3 bedroom houses.

Another Canadian
Another Canadian

Yep, I earn 57k per year for myself with $25k for her after getting my kids setup with laptop or PC for each of them I think the same way. Tuition etc cost of book, college fees that never end etc. Saving for the retirement in addition to my pension plan, municipal Tax, provincial (state) and federal tax. I have no need to have a cute appliance if I could find same at half price and sometime even better with some due research.

bimjimmy
bimjimmy

Seems to me people here speak their minds and tell the truth. Even if your name is really Steve Jobs, other people have a right to their opinions and to voice them - within human rights limits, of course - so, if the truth makes you uncomfortable and you can't handle the opinions of others, maybe the best thing for you to do is unsubscribe here. Have a great life with that tunnel vision and selective hearing...

cbellur
cbellur

That's a good point, but I don't think Apple is going for a batch/sync type client/server model. They're going for real time -- being connected all the time. And sure, you can access saved content. It's more like a hand held Mac -- if you're not connected to the internet, you don't get stock quotes or whatever. Also, I know you are employing hyperbole, but Apple actually has a better market share than Windows Mobile. Apple is big enough to be the target of hackers. One thing I notice is that my Mac is constantly being updated with security patches. Not just on Patch Tuesday, but all the time. I would actually be more worried about security flaws in Windows Mobile or Android apps -- the apps themselves can be portals into sensitive information and the app vendor could be a hacker.

bitdoctor
bitdoctor

Would have been nice for you to give a direct link to the fb page. Either way, I agree with you. Be sure and report it also to your local authorities, to Visa or MC - whomever is your credit card provider - and to FCC and FTC, as well as the Attorney General of your state. You, and the folks with the fb page can band together and initiate a class-action suit against Apple - like the whole "cheapo 1st Generation iPod suit" (I got my $35 out of that one! - they had the 1st ones with such cheapo screens that they scratched if you BREATHE on them [only a slight exaggeration]). PLUS, Apple MUST CONFORM TO "PAYMENT CARD INDUSTRY" (PCI) Compliance standards, and if they (or their partner credit card gateway processor) are failing to investigate such fraud, then be sure and let the PCI Industry and Visa/MC folks know - and they can fine apple either per incident or otherwise! Actually, they (PCI & Visa/MC) can shut down the Apple Store completely for PCI non-compliance - if they find these incidents to be factual, and Apple to be at fault and/or non-compliant.

lyon_bleu
lyon_bleu

Apple is certainly not flawless, yet it has a good track record for identifying and deprecating stale technology -- more like BMW or Sanyo, than Mercedes or Sony. Does any one else remember the hoot and holler surrounding Apple's abandonment of the 3.5" floppy with the introduction of the iMac? What makes this race more interesting is Adobe's attempt to justify the rescaling of Flash -- originally conceived as a developer-friendly framework for insertion of multimedia content into digitized presentations such as CD-ROMs and web pages -- by including XML tagging, such as they have done with the PDF and PS formats. YouTube, arguably a forum for best practices among multimedia content servers, has indicated its interest in exploiting the latest HTML5 RFC for multimedia content presentation. So which is more correct: A) supporting a technology that has become extended far beyond its original capacity and requires considerable patches to bring it into compliance with public APIs, B) or embracing a technology that is designed to be extensible and publicly accepted?

Another Canadian
Another Canadian

Hi, Agreed with your past statement, my iTouch first generation wasn't even compatible with their docking base that they were selling at the time, I mean it will work but without the functionality that the iPod have. I did make sure that the icon of the iTouch was on the box before buying it but no luck. Missing microphone, Cam, limited in capacity etc, when they know from the get go that the consumer wanted the cam and microphone so I could have used it as mini voice recorder etc and mini all in one camera etc. Poor batteries life also even when you play MP3 on it compare to a MP3 player that could last days and days before a need to recharge or replace the rechargeable batteries by a fresh one. I believe very much in saving the environment. I have now decided to not bother to buy another one (iTouch) and will give it to my wife that crave for it even with it actual limited capability but useful for her, and me I will go with a simple MP3 player and a Windows tablet that are made in Montreal for half the price up to same price (Options) with all the functionality of a computer from the get go and portability. I still love my Desktop which is a QC6600 Quad core with Win 7 64 bits pro (Started with Vista 32 bits and after SP1 it was great) and 4 gig ram and it does games at same time that I am recording a movie on it. Great flexibility, expansion, possibility to turn it later in a beefy Windows Home Server later on for myself and replace the one I already own that I could give to my mother with a no hassle setup for her and peace of mind for me. I am in the process to transfer all my DVD collections to that server and use a cheap but powerful multimedia extender for feeding a true 1080P HD to my TV via the HDMI port. Gosh I love Windows and even Linux. My sister wanted an apple and I gave her my 3 years old PC that is still in a very good shape and running on Vista SP1 and she is just in nirvana now and she play casual games and record TV from time to time and do other some consumer casual stuff on the cheap with it and without me having a single phone call from her related to that PC :). She is now 50 and not senile or brain dead but she is not what we call a geek (her background is agronomy) not computer science loll. So for the one that said PC of today are just unstable you are just full of S or did not try a decent PC with decent hardware spec. or worst you don't want to know because you feel you are too good for that not good looking PC. P.S.; Get a decent and well built motherboard and any PC will scream especially if you combine it with a good CPU (no need to be unlock or over clock also) and respectable and now cheap power supply that are even 80 plus for energy rating and any Windows or Linux "box" will equal a bottom of the line Apple for almost half the cost and I am generous about half the cost. The crappy PC is the one that are bought at my work place by thousand at the time with the minimum spec that will accommodate a day to day working Public Servant or private corporation but will not upgrade to anything higher in spec requirement. To be honest it is cheaper in the long run to just have a flat rate of buyback at $100 each by a reseller after and just bought the next one that will meet the next OS requirement once the next OS has a proven track record in the market place.

htaylor
htaylor

I am a real IT guy, and I pull out my Apple IIe to Play Oregon Trail all the time. But I must say that was the last Apple PC that I owned. My parents bought it when I was 7 or 8. I aquired it when I was 18 because I could not bear to see it tossed out on the curve. As far as work goes... I will never work on a Mac. In my opinion, they are overpriced toys that look fancy. They do the exact same thing that a pc does with a higher price tag. The only market where they once had a lead which was graphics design, they are no longer the best as independant software developers realized that you HAVE to make a pc version of your product to remain profitable. This is true especially in the modern recession where getting IT projects approved is much worse than pulling teeth. As far as the iPhone is concerned. Its a gameboy on crack. I was a 2nd Gen adopter and had fun playing with this new app or that new app for a few months, but as soon as an Adroid phone was released, I went back to my true love of opensource because for me as an end user and IT Pro... opensource = open choice. Overall, Apple left a bitter taste in my mouth sometime in the mid to late 90s. Their new gadgets are nice to play with, but their 80s business mentality and policies have kept me at bay...

Mr. Tinker
Mr. Tinker

However I posted in another related thread here regarding Steve Jobs and Adobe, I believe Steve is right on this one. Flash is proprietary and looks like it's been thumbing its nose at Apple for years now. Flash doesn't even work very well with PC's - and DOES NOT WORK AT ALL on any Windows Phone! Its time to move off of Adobe and get into the 21st century.

bimjimmy
bimjimmy

I'm an observer... and I observe that most of the cars at the side of the road nowadays are the expensive junk - Mercedes, BMWs, Infinitys, etc. Today's standards are sadly lacking, not what they used to be. Even the Mercedes of the world are cutting corners now!!!

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Where's the proof of noncompliance?

vucliriel
vucliriel

... It was a poor pretext for bashing Apple, Flash deserves a LOT of criticism. Any company that interferes with people's free will is goimg to get an earful from techies. It's not strictly an Apple thing, although they deserve a lot of it for their tyranical ways.

bitdoctor
bitdoctor

I would have to go look at the specs, but I believe they are supposed to actively investigate any fraud and take action vs. "not taking action," which may equal non-compliance - again, I have to delve into that portion of the spec. BUT, certainly if they have left open a hole where hackers are procuring the use of card numbers belonging to other people; and not providing adequate front-end + back-end verification/authentication, then they are being non-compliant - AND, as you pointed out, that would have to be proven. Bottom line: If they do, indeed, have a large number of such incidents then, in all likelihood, their compliance can be challenged. At the very least, MC, Visa and PCI compliance folks should be notified of the suspected holes in Apple's armor. Once they are notified by enough customers then they (Visa, MC & PCI compliance auditors) typically initiate an investigation.

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