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IT's seven wonders of world -- Are these really the best?


CIO Magazine recently named its list of Seven Wonders of the IT World:

  1. The Linux kernel
  2. OQO, Model 02 (smallest PC to run Windows Vista)
  3. IBM BlueGene/L (largest supercomputer)
  4. The E-sciencE II project (largest computer grid)
  5. Google data center in Oregon
  6. NASA's Voyager 1 satellite (the computer farthest from Earth)
  7. Floating Webcam at the North Pole

I really like the concept of highlighting the top technological marvels of the IT world, but am I the only one who thinks that this list is pretty lame and unexciting?

How about MAE East and MAE West? They are the heart of the Internet. How about the Bill Gates house? It is the ultimate IT-enabled home for hosting business associates. What about Intel Research Labs? It's pretty cool to see all those people in white coats building the next generation chips that will power computers, phones, and the Internet.

What else do you think should make the list of the seven wonders of the IT world? Join the discussion.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

9 comments
techotter
techotter

Who's the best boxer of all time? Ali or Joe Lewis? Who's the most influential rock band? The Beatles or Bill Haley and the Comets? What was the most usable 8-bit personal computer ever made? The Commodore 64 or the Apple IIe? Where does it stop? As far as IT tools go, how about XTreePro? The development of USB? SpinRite? DSL? (or maybe ISDN?) Electric screwdrivers? UTP? I think CIO Magazine needs to get a grip on itself and start devoting space to items that are of substantive benefit to the IT community.

chrisbedford
chrisbedford

In my experience a lot of CIOs are not IT people, they are bean-counters who had an interest in computers a little beyond using a spreadsheet. Many of them are just typical pointy-haired bosses with no more understanding of IT than, say, the HR director. That's why I think the "I" in CIO stands for "Idiot". CIO magazine, by the same token, has jumped into what they saw as another market niche - and these days, any publishing house that isn't starting a new monthly at least twice a year considers itself stagnant - by pandering to the egos of these CIO twits. Publish the same pseudo-intellectual "leadership" and "executive summary" articles that you can find in any number of other magazines, just rewritten slightly to "focus" on the ICT side of business instead of "financial" or "marketing" or whatever. Waste of money. Don't buy it. But trust me on the sunscreen.

aleigh
aleigh

I'm sure I'll get flamed for this, but one would be Wal-Mart's IT network, complete with the private satellite constellation and the inventory system.

unhappyuser
unhappyuser

YAWN.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

There are a lot more impressive and exciting options than what was on this list.

JDSAL
JDSAL

How can the internet itself not even be mentioned and linux kernel is?? One day we'll look upon Linux as we do the 'Homebrew computer club'(IMO).

drowningnotwaving
drowningnotwaving

It's difficult to see how any change has has more of an impact on the world's use of computer technology than the Internet. And Linux as number 1 ?????? It's just another operating environment.

DanLM
DanLM

Chuckle, how about some of the pictures that have been posted here on TR about wire nightmares. It's a wonder people come out of there alive. Super computers shouldn't be on the list. They will always get bigger and faster. How about the mars rovers? They have been going years past their life expectancy? Dan

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