Tablets investigate

Leaderboard: The 10 hottest tablets of 2011

Because tablets are the hot new thing, there is suddenly a deluge of choices and more coming. See which tablets are worth your attention.

Tablets are the technology's industry's latest gold rush. With Apple selling 15 million iPads in 2010 and projected to sell as many as 45 million in 2011, everyone wants a piece of the public's sudden infatuation with multitouch slabs of silicon.  From the world's biggest computer companies to obscure little parts makers, there are an obscene number of companies releasing tablets this year.

Which ones are safe to ignore and which ones are worth your attention? At the beginning of the year, I wrote a piece called The 10 hottest tablets to watch in 2011. Many of these tablets have come to market, or will soon, and a couple new ones have popped up that deserve a spot on the list. Also, based on my reviews of several of these tablets, the order of ranking has changed. For example, the Motorola Xoom has dropped from the No. 2 spot to the No. 9 spot and the Notion Ink Adam, Acer Iconia, and T-Mobile G-Slate have dropped off the list entirely.

So, here is my updated assessment of the top tablets of 2011.

10. Samsung Sliding PC 7

A Windows 7 tablet that is legitimately intriguing is Samsung's Sliding PC 7. It looks like a normal 10-inch tablet, but includes a slide-out keyboard that turns it into a fully functional laptop. The hardware manages to deftly combine slimness with keyboard usability, based on the demo at CES. For those who don't want to carry both a laptop and a tablet, hybrid devices like this could carve out a new niche. This one has a 1366x768 screen, up to a 64GB solid state drive, 2GB of RAM, and built-in 3G and WiMAX chips. Since it runs all of that hardware and the full version of Windows, battery life will be a concern. It also costs $650 and tablets over $600 have not been very well received by the public.

9. Motorola Xoom

When Google is ready to make a leap forward with Android, it anoints a hardware partner to work closely with the company on the new software and produce a device that will be an initial concept vehicle of what Google envisions. For its Android 3.0 tablet OS, Motorola was the chosen one. And, interestingly enough, the Motorola Xoom was not only be the first Honeycomb tablet, but also the first tablet to run on Verizon's new 4G LTE superhighway. This 10-inch widescreen tablet has drool-inducing tech specs but the Android tablet software is incomplete and desperately needs more apps. The other big drawback is the price. It retails for $799 without a contract. Even the Wi-Fi version is $599. It will be tough to justify that price until Google cleans up Honeycomb and gets app builders on board. Read full review.

8. HTC Flyer

Half of the tablets on this list are powered by Android and HTC is one of the powerhouses of the Android ecosystem. Unlike rivals Motorola, Samsung, and LG, who all unveiled high-end tablets at CES 2011, HTC was remarkably silent on the tablet question in Vegas. However, the company officially announced its first tablet a month later at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. It is the HTC Flyer and it's a 7-incher with 1.5 GHz CPU, 1.0 GB RAM, 32GB of Flash storage, an attractive unibody design, and a special version of the HTC Sense UI designed for tablets. Unlike most of the other Android tablets, the Flyer also includes digital ink technology and a stylus. However, the Flyer will not run Android 3.0. Instead, it will launch with Android 2.3 Gingerbread. Given the problems with Honeycomb and HTC's strong track record with its Sense UI, this could be a very usable little tablet.

7. Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9

The original Samsung Galaxy Tab was a 7-inch tablet that jumped the gun on Android tablets before Google was ready but it also offered the first legitimate challenge to the iPad. If it wasn't so expensive ($600), it might have faired even better than the respectable sales numbers that it posted. Samsung's second try at the tablet market looks a lot more potent. Running the official Android tablet OS this time, Samsung is preparing to launch 8.9-inch and 10.1-inch versions of the Galaxy Tab in mid-2011. The 8.9-inch model could prove to be the most attractive, since it's a little smaller than the 10-inch tablets like the iPad and the Xoom, which can be slightly awkward to hold and enter data. Plus, the Samsung Galaxy Tab has a great price tag -- $439 for the Wi-Fi model -- and Samsung is making these tablets very friendly for enterprise buyers.

6. B&N Nook Color

The Barnes & Noble Nook Color e-reader recently got an update to Android 2.2 and its own app store, which has turned it into a viable low-cost tablet. Some will argue against it since it has a heavy-handed UI forced on top of Android and doesn't run the full Android Market app store. But, I couldn't leave this little 7-inch tablet off the list. It has a great form factor -- thin and easy in the hands -- and you can't beat the price at $249. Plus, if you're highly technical, you can hack it into a full Android tablet.

5. ASUS Eee Pad Transformer

ASUS believes that the iPad has two weaknesses -- lack of choice and limited productivity (content creation) -- so that's where the company is focusing its energy in tablets. At CES, ASUS unveiled its line of four tablets, and three of them were aimed at content creators. The most interesting was the Eee Pad Transformer, a 10-inch tablet with a dual core NVIDIA Tegra 2 CPU that runs Android 3.0. The most innovative thing about this one is that it has an optional keyboard dock that also functions as an extended battery, giving the device up to 16 hours of life. ASUS has pulled off an Android tablet that also doubles as a laptop when the Transformer is in dock mode. Plus, the price is right. At $399, this tablet is one of the best values on the market, so it's no surprise that it it sold out in the US on its first day of online sales.

4. BlackBerry PlayBook

I was at the event last fall where RIM announced the BlackBerry PlayBook and my first impressions were not very good -- mostly because RIM kept it behind glass. However, after getting my hands on the final product, I was a lot more impressed. The PlayBook looks like it could become a factor in the tablet market, especially for businesses that are already invested and committed to the BES backend infrastructure. This is a 7-inch tablet, so that limits its appeal a bit -- except for the vocal minority who like the smaller form factor. Still, the hardware feels great, the tablet OS is easy to figure out, and the performance is staggeringly good. BlackBerry die-hards alone could turn this one into a winner. It's also the best tablet for Web browsing because of its excellent implementation of Flash.

3. The Amazon tablet

Amazon appears to be putting all the pieces in place to build its own Android tablet. In fact, it may be better positioned to compete with Apple than any of the other tablet makers because of its strengths in content and cloud computing. Amazon already had the Kindle e-book library and Web-based music and video stores, but in 2011 it has added the Amazon Appstore for Android and Amazon Cloud Drive. Plus, the word out of Asia is that Amazon is prepping a low-cost tablet using an E-ink display. Amazon hasn't made any announcements yet, so this tablet benefits from lots of positive speculation, but the stars appear to be aligning for a formidable tablet product from the world's e-commerce king, which will likely price it low and make money off the content sales.

2. HP TouchPad

I think we can safely call this one the "X factor." Even after Hewlett-Packard officially unveiled its webOS tablet on February 9, there are still two big questions hanging out there - when exactly will it arrive ("summer" is all we know) and how much will it cost? This product has been in the works since HP bought Palm last summer. Putting the resources of HP behind the massive potential of webOS could be great combination. Also, don't forget that HP has a decade of experience building tablet hardware -- even if it was as part of the long defeat for Microsoft's Tablet PC. HP's new TouchPad is 9.7-inch tablet with lots of high-end features, but it doesn't have much to distinguish it from Apple or Android and that could hurt. The tablet will likely succeed or fail based on price. If it is comparable to the iPad ($500) while offering a stronger feature-set, it has a shot. If it's more expensive than the iPad then it could struggle. Still, the WebOS is a natural fit for tablets and the TouchPad could potentially trump the iPad in true multitasking, better integrated notifications, and messaging.

1. Apple iPad 2

The iPad remains the king of the category and, even with the invasion of an army of challengers, it's difficult to see a scenario in which the iPad won't retain a commanding market share lead when we get to the end of 2011. It still has too many factors in its favor: usability, battery life, a massive catalog of apps, and price. The last factor might be the most important. In 2010, price was the iPad's greatest marketing weapon as rivals had a very hard time meeting the iPad's price tag while offering a comparable experience. The iPad 2 doesn't offer any revolutionary new changes. It's thinner and lighter, has an upgraded processor and display, and adds front and rear cameras. It's a nice refinement, and with its big advantages in app and content libraries, it easily has enough value to keep it at the top of the list. Read full review.

Which tablet would you pick?

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

80 comments
sck52462
sck52462

Which readers among us would be most interested in learning about the 10best, then the 9th best, etc. and stop short of the topmost few?

rogerdjr
rogerdjr

With Windows tablets hitting the market, I'm much more interested in their quality and performanc. Can they run the full office professional suite? How about graphics - cad programs And replaceable batteries? How about using them outside in the glare of the sun or as a chart / navigatireplacement for the ipad in my airplane

enida
enida

Really, the B&N Color Nook made the list with Android 2.2, when there are the two Acer tablets, one A500 with ANdroid 3 and a price of $450, and the W500 with Win & and dockable keyboard (price of $619)? This list really does not take into account the true players in this new and rising arena of play.

MacNewton
MacNewton

Well, it looks like Apple & Steve Jobs has inspired the whole world in designing & developing a new type of computer platform. "The Tablet" Yes, I know that here were other Tables on the market before the iPad came a long. But it was the iPad that really started this thing going. So like it or not, Apple has influenced every new "Tab" that this forum has listed. Not to say that every little pice of software is a copy, but Apples' DNA can be found in each of them. So I would like to take this time to Thank Steve & Apple for All there hard work. Without you & Apple a lot of people would be out of a job, and manufactures would be still making low cost " NetBooks" My bet is that Apple will now move on to a totally new "Next best thing" sometime later this year.

ontopper
ontopper

Guys, there are herds of chinese tablets out there with all the bells and whistles, which do all that iPad does (and plus) selling for less than $200, such as Feichu x210 (or something of the sort) with two 32GB SD card slots, two USB 2.0 ports, HDMI port, ethernet port, stereo sound with built-in speakers, GPS that works, camera, software to run Office apps and a long list of etc'as. The only weakness is the resistive touch. Wake up fellas!

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

I have to agree with a number of previous commenters that models that aren't yet available on the market should not have been included; odds are that they will have little to no impact on the overall numbers by the end of this year unless they can command the iPad's level of sales in six months or less. That eliminates half of your list right there, opening it up for other existing devices that others have suggested.

alawishis
alawishis

Number one is the iPad2 and numbers two and three are items that do not yet exist. Doesn't it make more sense to bump down the vaporware and rank it iPad2 then playbook ...etc.

MarlinUX
MarlinUX

The big question is what will be the performance of each of these new tablet when using the web or apps. For example, I think the Motorola Xoom is great, but in our latest tablet benchmark it was 30% slower then the Dell Streak 7. Issues with Android 3.0 slowing performance aside, tablets for 2011 need to focus on performance and less on sizzle. That's what will keep users doing real business on a tablet. See the rest of our benchmarks at http://www.marlinmobile.com/blog

MacNewton
MacNewton

Its good to see that Apple is leading the Pack! Time will tell if any of the others will still be available in a year from now. By this time next year Apple will have other " Tablet" offerings. My bet is on a full OSX / iSO unit utilizing the core composites used in the MacBook Air. If you reverse the screen and make it a touch screen, your almost 90% done. - This is doable and not just a fantasy, but it would be a dream come true.

1611kjb
1611kjb

Truth be told, there's a couple things I *MUST* have to buy a tablet. One of the most inportant for me is that Flight software run on it as an eletronic flight bag (EFB), iPad has the edge there, but the GPS is not WAAS compatible and that is a big detractor. Most other systems do not have GPS built in, so they are non-starters. The second issue is Microsoft Apps. The tablet must be able to work with spreadsheets. documents and presentations - not the lame "I made my own", but the comfortable, portable, I'm familiar with it apps that the business world uses daily. Finally, I need a good data plan. Why is it my Droid phone has an unlimited data plan, but I can't get one for a tablet? As an added feature though, I would like to see telephone service available in the tablet. While I'm not ready to hold one up to my ear, bluetooth *AND* a corded headphone jack would make this a very useful tool. Let's face it, the world is not filled with 90% who need to jog/walk and talk on the phone at the same time. Most peopl;e are stopped and sednetary when using the equipment, or in a vehicle or place where bluetooth will work just as well as a headset. In fact, make a detachable handset with the phone internals in it so you can take your phone with you. Allow people to turn in their phone and buy a tablet/handset combination and you won't be able to find an iPad. Now there's an invention waiting for an inventor. You don't dock the tablet, you dock the phone - also serves as a mobile GPS with telephone connections for POIs - wow!

pjboyles
pjboyles

I don't need a toy. I need something my business applications work on without rewriting.

HansPille
HansPille

yes, slightly older, one year now. But at least it does support USB ports, has separate e-reader and colour screens. I admit that I use it for work, and I do not play games on it. I'll happily admit that ipads are better to play games.

carol.fuhr
carol.fuhr

I could forgive including 1 nonexistent tablet to reach a round number, but to give the #2 spot to a prototype and #3 to a rumor is ridiculous.

bervick
bervick

Are you insane ? The HP has not released and it got the 2nd spot. Take a look at the poll results. I think that is a reasonably good indicator.

asaverio
asaverio

Creative Labs have 2 nice tablets (7" and 10") and a mp3/mp4 player based on Android, that is very interesting, and they are not on this list. Why?

tinyang73
tinyang73

This list may be helpful to those considering one of these tablets in the list, but I just picked up an eLocity A7 tablet, and it's got to be the best under $300 android tablet on the market right now! It's got the dual core 1ghz arm processor combined with a stable yet recent Android 2.2 and is slated (no pun intended) to get an upgrade to Android 3.0! This tablet cannot be beat for the price.

skf
skf

The I-pad is a big I-phone that doesn't make calls. It took a year to add a camera. What's the big deal. The Motorola XOOM is a PC replacement, not a toy.

richard.beebe
richard.beebe

I have been looking for something to replace my Motion LS800 and since there's some software I don't want to give up, I've been focusing on Windows tablets rather than Android. Samsung is the only representative on this list. On paper the HP Slate 500 looks good but it's not making anyone's top-10 lists either. So does it look like Windows tablets are a dying breed?

ken lillemo
ken lillemo

I have been using one for a few months and like everything about it so far. One small exception is the Win7 OS uses pretty small targets for touch control of normal apps. This compounded with a ever so slight offset in screen calibration took some adjustment to accomodate. This is really a netbook with full up Win7 and a touch screen that flips to face outside when closed over the keyboard. The $550 price is a good value over many other netbooks offering a crippled Win7 OS. The flip mode touchscreen just makes this value even better.

mapsonburt
mapsonburt

The initial drop of the PlayBook was ready for BlackBerry owners but had some shortcomings for owners of other smarphones. Those will all be addressed through biweekly software updates... the device itself is darn near perfect. Here's some reasons why: 1) It fits in your pocket/purse so you take it with you. Most iPads/Xooms are home by the TV a month after they were bought as the just don't get dragged along on a daily basis. Add to that some reasons below, and most people STILL take a laptop with them. Isn't portability/mobility the most important use case for a tablet??? 2) It runs the real web, not some mobile subset. This thing is more HTML compatible than most desktop browsers. It runs flash and renders the pages as if you were at a computer. I can get a mobile subset from my smartphone. If I'm spending 499-699 on a tablet, I want it to give me the full web experience. 3) It allows me to create/edit Microsoft Office documents (Word, Powerpoint and Excel). I can display them on a full 1080p projector/monitor/TV while continuing to use my PlayBook for looking at the speakers notes, sending emails, looking things ip on the web, etc. With forthcoming DLNA support, I'll be able to hook up to these HD devices WIRELESSLY. Imagine... wandering around the stage with my playbook, advancing slides, showing full 1080p videos... no cords. 4) Full HD cameras front and back for astounding video conferencing. The 5M Camera on the back takes astonishingly good videos and the 3M on on the front already shows every blemish on my face! The stereo sound is fantastic too. I use this with my wfie to video chat when I'm on the road - both in bed, no reason to go down to the computer. 5) Sharing data/files. It has USB support. Full USB OTG (on the go) is coming but better than that, this thing shows up on my network as a NW drive WIRELESSLY. I can drag/drop files to it, setup automatic syncronization, or play files from it with my PS3, Wii or X-Box 360. I can sync to iTunes wirelessly as well. But I don't NEED iTunes for anything. A Tablet is meant to be a portable device that gives you productive access to all your data/media and internet content. I don't want to have to bring along my Laptop to do real productive work... I expect my tablet to be used for work and play.. The PlayBook is the only tablet so far that can do this. And don't get me started on the iPad's security issues. If I can't use a tablet to connect to my corporate intranet/applications, then its useless to me.

tompratt
tompratt

When I read the Xoom review I had to go back to the top to double check the date. Really? This is May and a Tech Republic writer is still saying that a drawback is the price? Someone needs to do some homework as the 32G Wifi Xoom is the exact same price as the 32G iPad2 with significantly better hardware specs. Like double the RAM. And in May 2011, what good is a web browser that doesn't support Flash? (I detest flash, but it is a requirement on the web today) I wanted an iPad 2 but bought a Xoom because it was just too painful to try to get an iPad 2 in March. The argument about apps is weak as well, as there is not a single app that I need and don't have. Unless Garage Band is a requirement for you, Android already has what you need and more apps are added every day.

jgmankos
jgmankos

Seriously...an unreleased HP tablet that is a huge question mark at number 2...and a rumored, unknown tablet at Number 3??? You trash the XOOM for lacking in APPS (which I don't get the gripe?) but you don't know what's going to be available for the TouchPad and that's OK. A little consistency please...

MacNewton
MacNewton

Yes, your right about that rogerdjr. The windows Tab must have an easy way to replace the Battery. Let's say every 2 hours or so. Windows will suck the living life out of any battery you put into it.

kwolf
kwolf

I purchased from merimobiles (http://www.merimobiles.com) a HeroTab X5A about a month ago. This particular model is not as strong or beefy as some of the other models / brands they carry, but I have to say I have been very happy with my decision. I paid (including shipping) about $178.00. It has many additional features (that work by the way) that your more expensive "name brand" tablets do not offer. It is a very solid unit. Supports HDMI out, external keyboard / mouse, with full size usb port, mini usb port. I have rooted it and applied a couple of hacks from slatedroid.com to extend battery life and to fix 3D graphics. This particular model does not have Flash 10.1 and is running Android 2.1. They have models that have 2.3 Android and Flash with pretty impressive hardware specs. My question is...do you really need one of these "Top 10" tablets??? When alternatives are available at significant price differences? I am sure for some the answer is yes for their own reasons. But for others.....? Think about it.

bryanabaya
bryanabaya

Could this have been just a propaganda, a marketing effort by those companies? Seems like this lacks credibility primarily because of the reasons stated by previous people. Dell Streak not even making it to the list whilst a "theoretical" device by HP number 2? Seriously...

dcolbert
dcolbert

if the Eee Pad Transformer could ship in significant numbers, all indications are that it would be creating a significant challenge for the iPad 2 at the price that it is currently marked at. Unfortunately, from all reasonable assessments it is a tablet only slightly more tangible than Duke Nuke 'Em Forever is a video game. Unfortunately, the ASUS Eee Pad may be causing a backlog of Android tab purchasers who are holding off on very respectable tablets like the Acer Iconia. The Toshiba, HTC and next round of Samsung tablets may be arriving by the time the Eee Pad builds up significant stock to meet demand. Eventually, you're going to see the tablet market reflect the smart phone market. In single numbers, the iPad may have the largest MINORITY share of the market, but the majority share overall will be Android tabs - It... is.... inevitable... (say that last part in Agent Smith's voice for dramatic effect. Thanks).

rogerdjr
rogerdjr

Hopefully the next review will address the new windows tablets?

MacNewton
MacNewton

Yes, the iPad makes calls' not a problem. I'm using my Bluetooth & Skype call, It makes it a good option for some. Toy you say. Yes its also a very good game system. By I also work from it. I use Pages and Number Bento. Whats that you say. go look it up and learn.

TexasJetter
TexasJetter

Eee Slate is a 12.1" multi-touch screen with an Intel Core i-5 running full Windows 7 OS. They have a couple of different models around $1,000. It's been out for a couple of months, but seems to be perpetually on back order now.

MacNewton
MacNewton

RIMs' new PayBook is not taking off , but crashing hard. Not to say that it may get off the ground one day. But the reports are in. The PayBook has lots of Apple DNA going for it, but very little in the way of useful apps. Now they are reporting buggy OS problems. Sorry RIM nice try...

MacNewton
MacNewton

Looks like you may be wrong on that. The PayBook is not selling that well in the US. In Vancouver there flying off the shelf , lots of BB users in my area.

ricardo.bernardo
ricardo.bernardo

Well Said I live in South Africa, so the Playbook is not hear yet :(

BaconSmoothie4-2
BaconSmoothie4-2

Oh wow, someone is writing about an actual product that they own and have experience with. I thought this article was just for Tabs that hadn't been released yet. This should have been a top 5. How can you rate anything in a top 10 list that doesn't even exist yet? You didn't see it, you didn't touch it, you didn't use it and yet you put it on your top 10 list? Talk about integrity? I can't wait til next month when he reviews the 2018 Prius!!

wdewey@cityofsalem.net
wdewey@cityofsalem.net

The ADAM appears to be an impressive device, but the support and manufacturing are in question. I have read a lot about this device and on paper it's great, but the implementation has lots of problems. Bill

JJFitz
JJFitz

Microsoft has never and does not currently plan to manufacture tablet hardware. So are you implying that there is something inherently wrong in the Windows OS that makes it "suck the living life out of any battery put into it?" Wouldn't we have experienced this already in the laptop market? I have had 4 different Windows Tablet OS PC's from 2 different hardware manufacturers. The battery life of each model was comparable to that of any laptop. The fact that the batteries are user replaceable is a plus in my opinion. My current Windows 7 convertible tablet pc has slots for 2 batteries provided you sacrifice the CD/DVD drive. A single charge lasts all day for me. I can't imagine that the battery life on a Windows OS made for a slate type tablet would fare any worse than iOS, Web OS or Android. Are basing your opinion on fact, first hand experience or personal bias?

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Just remember what happened to Agent Smith at the end. I wouldn't bet on Android surviving if it can't mature as an OS. The only reason I can see for Android doing as well as it does on smart phones is that they're on average less than half the price of the iPhone. Until it can do the same on tablets you simply won't see that kind of movement. Now that Apple has expanded its market exposure with Verizon and offering the previous-generation iPhone at $50, the Android market in the US has visibly slowed.

ajethridge
ajethridge

And I love it! Dispite the short battery life. But then I only turn it on when I use it. The short boot time is amazing. I also have an HP 500 (the school I work for bought it for me). The EP121 bootups from dead cold to UI almost a 20 seconds befor the HP 500. I even turned on the HP 500 before I turned on the EP121. I hope ASUS follows up the ep121 with a seciond and third generation.

chrism
chrism

No problem with the Adam I have. Now the iPad I support for the director is a real pain, causing email issues for him (between desktop and iPad), not able to print from it, etc. I'll keep my Adam, thank you.

JJFitz
JJFitz

News flash! Removable batteries are also covered under warranty. Plus, you don't have to return the entire device back to the manufacturer to fix the issue. You get a new battery mailed to you while you continue using your device on AC. If I threw (not through) in a new battery and that didn't solve the problem I would then be able to return the device to the manufacturer. I have supported hundreds of Windows laptops and lots of Windows tablets at my job and I have never seen a battery problem caused by the operating system.

MacNewton
MacNewton

The idea of me using a Tablet PC running Windows OS, is about the same idea as me swimming across the English Channel. It's not going to happin'. Now back to the Battery - It's all about the tech behind the battery & the type of battery used , and this configuration will allow the battery to last most of the day and also last the life of the product. If the OS and the battery Technology is up to todays standards (Like Apple iPad2) then you're not going to need to replace the battery. But if you have a battery failure , have it replaced under warranty (3 years with Apple care) If its after warranty, send it to Apple for replacement . Not only to they replace the battery, but they will also check to see what the problem was & if they can, repair it for you. In your PC Tablet, you would just through in a new battery and hope for the best, not knowing if the battery was damaged or if it was a system problem. Then when you find out that it was indeed the system, try getting you money back for the replacement batter you just purchased, Hope I got my point across to you.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

As far as I know, the iPad is still selling more units than all of those you just named combined. I won't argue that, like your Agent Smith, Android clones will eventually overwhelm the iPad in sheer numbers, but like Agent Smith, they could well implode if they can't adapt to a changing environment quickly enough. Personally, for now it appears they can't. Android tablets are moving VERY slowly at the moment and Android phone growth has slowed dramatically since February. We'll just have to see what the June quarter numbers have to show before we can make any kind of real analysis.

dcolbert
dcolbert

This is an old argument that goes back to the first batch of 1g Android phones running Android 1.5... Android has matured, and is now the globally dominant phone OS platform. There is no way for Apple to compete with the *model* in this sense. The reason Android does well is because if you want a very inexpensive device that does Android... you can do that. If you want a very high end device with a great build quality and impressive technical specs, you can do that. If you want an Android device that is just plain vanilla without any extra bells or whistles, can do... want an Android device with special custom skins and modifications that makes it hardly recognizable as an Android device? Can do that, too. Can, Can Can. What are the choices with iOS? Do you want it in maxi or mini? Touch or Pad? WiFi or 3g, 8, 16, 32 or 64 GB? With or without cameras. Ok... that is it. There are your choices. Android already IS doing what you suggest on tablets. the ASUS Eee Pad Transformer is at $399 for a 16GB device that runs circles around an iPad 2 on raw specs. The ACER A500 Iconia is only $50 more. Both of them beat the nearest Android competitor, the 32GB Xoom, which at $599 is already beating the iPad 2 with similar specs. Verizon has refused to release numbers of iPhone sales. The industry speculation is that indicates that the numbers weren't as incredible as anticipated. Apple LOVES to trumpet numbers when they're good - so the lack of comment looks UN-good. I doubt the numbers are BAD... but when you're used to knocking every ball out of the park every time you come up to bat - those times when you only get a line run to 1st are kind of disappointing. Apple should have gone to Verizon when they were on top with no competition. Instead they waited so long that people on Verizon found an alternative to iOS in Android - and now a HUGE number of VZW are happy with the Android experience with no intentions of switching. That'll be seen as Apple's stategic mis-step in this battle, when we look back in 10 or 15 years at the evolution of the mobile device revolution.

T3CHN0M4NC3R
T3CHN0M4NC3R

The Android army ain't no cheaper than iPhone unless it is on a lesser hardware. If you wanna compare iPhone with an Android phone, use Samsung Galaxy S series. They(Samsung) are the prime factor of iPhone's success believe it or not(even though Samsung Touchwiz is slow and dumb).

rogerdjr
rogerdjr

Will access run on the Asus? Can it accept handwriting entries?