Smartphones

Leaderboard: The 12 best Android smartphones of 2010

A hot, new Android phone seems to hit the market almost every week. To help you sort through them all, here's our updated list of the 12 best Android smartphones, based on the quality and value of each device.

Because there's a stampede of Android smartphones barreling into the market -- including both excellent models and a few duds -- many people feel overwhelmed when trying to choose one. I get a lot of the "Would you get this one or that one" questions as well as plenty of requests to rank my favorites.

So I've decided to do something a little dangerous -- create a leaderboard of my top 10 Android picks. It's dangerous because this is very subjective stuff. The smartphone that is the best fit for you is going to depend heavily on your needs and preferences.

But, since I've had my paws on virtually all of the Android devices and I've written reviews of the best ones, I'm going to rank them in terms of the overall quality of the devices, with much more emphasis placed on the smartphones themselves than on the wireless carriers that they're tied to.

I also keep this leaderboard up to date. So, as I review new Android devices and decide that they deserve a place on the list, I will add them and bump other phones down or off the list. With this update, the new entrants to the list are the HTC Desire and the Motorola Droid Pro.

Caveat: This ranking is primarily based on US smartphones. In each country/region, the telecom carriers tend to name these devices by different names. In many cases you'll be able to find a close match between the devices on this list and devices in your area, but not in all cases.

Slideshow

You can also view this list as a slideshow and see larger photos of each of the devices.

1. HTC EVO 4G

Pound-for-pound and feature-by-feature, there's still nothing out there in Android land that can hang with the HTC EVO 4G. With its 4.3-inch WVGA screen, 8 megapixel camera, 1 GHz Snapdragon CPU, front-facing VGA camera, Micro HDMI port, 3G Wi-Fi hotspot, and 4G WiMAX capability, the EVO has it all. And, with its large on-screen keyboard and handy kickstand for watching video, it's a device that's easy and pleasant to use. When I reviewed it, I called the EVO "The Hummer of smartphones" because it's so huge and it's such a power hog, but there's no denying that it is the elite device of the Android fleet.

2. Google Nexus One

This was the first Android device that really knocked my socks off, and I still use it as the gold standard to measure every other Android smarty. Sure, it doesn't have the best battery life and its screen isn't as big and bold as the HTC EVO or the Droid X, but it is remarkably elegant and usable and it remains the one Android phone untarnished by the mobile manufacturers and telecom carriers. Google no longer sells it on the mass market but offers the N1 as a testing phone for Android developers. Still, as I said, it remains the gold standard and as long as Google keeps selling it in one form or another, it will likely remain on this list.

3. Samsung Vibrant

The Samsung Vibrant snuck up on a lot of people. Samsung hadn't produced many good smartphones in recent years. In fact, the Samsung Omnia was so bad that I rated it as one of the worst tech products of 2009. So when Samsung announced the Galaxy S, its first line of Android devices, expectations were fairly low. But, despite the marketing confusion of naming the Galaxy S something different (and giving it a slightly different configuration) on every carrier, the product has been a big hit, selling over a million units in its first 45 days on the market. The best of the Galaxy S models is T-Mobile's Samsung Vibrant, which is thin, powerful, has a great screen, and does the least amount of fiddling with the stock Android OS.

4. HTC Desire

This smartphone bears a very strong resemblance to the Nexus One and in the first half of the year it was released in Europe and Australia, where it became a popular choice in both markets. It has since spread to other international markets and became available in the US through regional carrier US Cellular. The Desire has nearly-identical hardware specs to the Nexus One and a very similar, high-quality outer shell that gives it an excellent build quality. The biggest differences are that the Desire has hardware navigation buttons instead of touch-sensitive buttons, an optical touchpad instead of a trackball, includes HTC Sense UI and an FM tuner, but lacks the second microphone for noise cancellation and the pins for a dock connector. Also, keep an eye on the HTC Desire HD (with a larger 4.3-inch screen) and the HTC Desire Z (with a slide-down keyboard).

4. HTC Incredible

One of the most anticipated US Android devices of 2010 was the Google Nexus One on Verizon. Unfortunately, it never happened -- partly because Verizon dragged its feet to allow the unlocked Nexus One on its network and partly because Google was unprepared to handle the customer service responsibilities for the Nexus One. As a result, the maker of the Nexus One, HTC, released a similar device called the HTC Incredible (sometimes referred to as the "Droid Incredible"). It's not quite as elegant or high-end as the Nexus One (or the HTC Desire), but the Incredible is still a solid workhorse of a smartphone.

5. Motorola Droid X

With Sprint's HTC EVO 4G drawing much of the attention of the Android world since its unveiling at CTIA 2010 in March, the response from Motorola and Verizon (the previous darlings of the Android world) was the Droid X. It matched the HTC EVO with a 4.3-inch screen, an 8 megapixel camera, a Micro HDMI port, and mobile hotspot functionality, but it lacked a front-facing camera, 4G connectivity, and the extra polish that HTC puts on Android with its Sense UI.

6. Samsung Epic 4G

This version of the Samsung Galaxy S is the one that departs most significantly from the standard form factor. That's mostly because it integrates a full 53-key slide-down hardware keyboard. But it's not just any keyboard. With it's large keys and dedicated row for number keys, it is arguably the best hardware qwerty on any Android device. It also features a 4-inch Super AMOLED screen, a zippy 1 GHz Samsung processor, and Sprint's 4G WiMAX service. I could certainly make a case for ranking this phone as high as number three on this list.

7. Motorola Droid Pro

No Android device has taken aim at business users more directly than the Motorola Droid Pro. The most obvious symbol is the Droid Pro's hardware keyboard, which effectively emulates the classic BlackBerry keyboard found on devices such as the BlackBerry Bold and the BlackBerry Curve. The Droid Pro also integrates enhanced security and management features (such as remote device wipe) that will appeal to larger organizations and their IT departments. These features don't quite bring Android up to the same level of enterprise readiness as BlackBerry (which offers even stronger encryption, for example), but many companies will likely view it as good enough. While the 3.1-inch screen of the Droid Pro is among the smallest of Android devices, this device will definitely appeal to those users who cling to the idea that they want and need a hardware keyboard, especially BlackBerry converts.

8. Samsung Captivate

The other Samsung Galaxy S to make this list is AT&T's Samsung Captivate, which has virtually all of the same internals and specs as the Samsung Vibrant but has a flatter, boxier form factor. The thinness of the Captivate combined with lots of punch and high-end features make this a very attractive phone. I actually prefer the design of the Captivate over its cousin the Vibrant (No. 3 on this list). However, AT&T has loaded it up with a ton of AT&T crapware that users cannot uninstall, and even worse, has restricted the device so that users can't "side-load" apps that are not in the Android Market. T-Mobile doesn't commit either of those two sins with the Vibrant, and that's what makes it a better choice.

10. Motorola Droid 2

The fact that this phone is all the way down at number seven on this list is an indication of just how competitive the Android market has become, because this is an excellent smartphone. The original Droid really kick-started the Android revolution and remained one of the best-selling Android devices on the market throughout the first half of 2010. The Droid 2 simply updates the design slightly, improves the keyboard, and replaces the internals with more powerful hardware. For those who prefer a physical keyboard and Verizon's top-notch coverage, the Droid 2 remains a great choice.

11. HTC Aria

The HTC Aria might be one of the best kept secrets of the Android world. HTC could have honestly named this phone the EVO Mini. It looks a lot like the EVO, but in a far smaller package. In fact, while the EVO is the biggest Android phone, the Aria is the most compact, with its 3.2-inch screen. That's its primary appeal -- along with a low price tag (it retails for $129 but you can usually find it for much less than that, even free, based on promotions). The biggest problems with the Aria are the underpowered 600 MHz CPU and the fact that, like the Galaxy S, AT&T has loaded it up with lots of crapware and limited it to only the applications in the Android Market.

12. LG Ally

The LG Ally is not very pretty -- except for being pretty underpowered -- but it does have a few redeeming qualities that can make it attractive. It has a great little hardware keyboard -- the best hardware keyboard on an Android device next to the Epic 4G. It's also very compact, though not as compact as the HTC Aria, since the Ally has the slider keyboard that makes it a little more bulky. But, the best feature is the price: $49. And, like the Aria, many customers will get it for free with the right promotion. For 50 dollars or less, this phone is a nice value.

Also read

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

84 comments
ok2phone-com
ok2phone-com

Top five android smartphone TOP 5 - Sony Ericsson Xperia neo MT15i See www.ok2phone.com for detail message The bright spot model: the Android 2.3 operating system, 1GHz clock speed processor, 480 854 pixel resolution, a 8.1 million pixel camera, Sony Ericsson Xperia the neo MT15i (hereinafter referred to as MT15i), faced with the overall price situation in HTC, MT15i played markdowns banner, this phone has dropped to $400, the price is quite tempting. Cheap achievements MT15i, and also let it become the market's most popular smart phones of $400 level. TOP 4 - Sony Ericsson X8 Models bright spot: 99 54 15 mm body measurements, 480 320 pixel resolution, the android smartphone operating system, 3.2-megapixel cameras, ranked fourth in the sales list this month Sony Ericsson X8 It is a compact mini-smartphones, 99.0 54.0 15.0 mm, body measurements to make it excellent grip handle. In addition, a 600MHz Qualcomm MSM7227 processor, as well as the Sony Ericsson system excellent optimization to ensure the speed of the mobile phone. TOP 3 - HTC Desire Sony Ericsson X8 positive with a 3.0 inches 480 320 pixels capacitive screen, the actual display can be considered quite satisfactory. In addition, a 600MHz Qualcomm MSM7227 processor, as well as the Sony Ericsson system excellent optimization to ensure the speed of the mobile phone. Desire (G7) can be said that HTC's classic, mainstream hardware configuration, as well as law-abiding, shape design make it very popular with young and trendy family favorite, excellent sales has brought huge profits for the HTC. TOP 2 - HTC Wildfire S The bright spot model: the Android 2.3 system, 600MHz Qualcomm MSM7227 processor, 512MB RAM, stylish compact body appearance, 320 480 pixel resolution, 5 megapixel camera. By virtue of lower market prices, as well as mainstream android smartphone operating system, HTC Wildfire S in the market by some low-end users of all ages, it is also by virtue of this, this phone can be squeezed into the top two. TOP 1 - HTC Incredible S Models bright spot: 1GHz clock speed processor, the android smartphone 2.2 operating system, 768MB RAM, 8-megapixel camera, 480 800 pixel resolution. HTC Incredible S is a strong performance smart phones, 1GHz Qualcomm MSM8255 processor and 768MB RAM as the machine's biggest selling point, since the market sentiment has been high. Perhaps by HTCSensation, Desire HD models, this phone has a certain decline, but integrated to look at the price is still slightly high, and specifically how to choose the needed combination personal economic and other factors considered.

rAllcorn
rAllcorn

Did the Thunderbolt not make your reviews? Recent online evals of the Thunderbolt vs iPhone 4 vs Droid, show the Thunderbolt right "up there" in the competition, taking the lead with both the 4G and the video quality. Just curious ...

ruwan
ruwan

Worst phone is Sony Ericsson Xperia X10i

jeferris
jeferris

I'd be interested to read more on your ratings of android devices. Personally, I have one of the first HTC Dreams... and been Very Happy with it. Yes, Rogers has loaded some c%&p-ware but not too much. It is locked on 1.5, tho an unofficial upgrade is possible. And compared to the newest, it is now slow. Would be interesting to see a comparison year-by-year of how things are improving, and features that are getting hard to find now. I love the trackball and full 5-row hardware qwerty, for example.

tccahill
tccahill

I went with the Captivate Galaxy S. I did find that you can remove all the ATT crap and you can sideload on this phone. I am in love with it once I completed that task.

slobodan.hajdin
slobodan.hajdin

Thank you for "Caveat: This ranking is primarily based on US smartphones". Of course, it's wrong. It's solely based on US market phones. And I think "UPDATED leaderboard: The 12 best Android smartphones" is not good title. It should be "UPDATED leaderboard: The 12 best Android smartphones I have tried". No hard feelings, eh?

K_Green
K_Green

Personally, I think it would help to structure this leaderboard differently. If the purpose of the leader board is to help the average phone buyer select a model, then at least one device doesn't belong on here: Google Nexus One. It isn't available to the general buying public anymore. This leader board should be converted to a download, so that a proper grid-based comparison can be made. Speeds, screen sizes, keyboard type, network speed, geographic availability, crapware quotient, etc etc. Such a comparison would also help when trying to decide if a new "gold standard" should be selected.

re.carter
re.carter

At one third the price of the rest the best value for money Andriod in the UK is the ZTE Blade aka Orange San Fransico....

MISDude-E
MISDude-E

...It has a physical Call and End button! You can dial the last person without looking at your phone. Just power up and hit Call, Call. To hang up any time just hit the End button (great for those quick hangups after you accidentally call someone). Physical phone buttons are always overlooked. I just wish there were bumps on the keys to make it even easier to do stuff without looking at the phone.

martyn.evans1955
martyn.evans1955

and the reason for showing this list without a proper price comparison is?

Black_Beardie
Black_Beardie

Nice Android write-up. It's helps one make a decision based on the performance, elegance and preloaded crapware of the various contenders. It's a real shame that the Nexus One is no longer available to the general public. Zephyr www.bright-work.co.uk

deanvisser
deanvisser

no motorola milestone on list? what is the major difference between droid and milestone. milestone an excellent phone, absolutely love it.

Photogenic Memory
Photogenic Memory

The phone is light years ahead of what I was using before which was an LG Lotus. So far; all the default apps give me what I need at a decent speed. The LCD screen is so much easier on my fingers than text buttons. I do need to download some extra apps like an ssh client and maybe some extras for fun. The phone can be easily toggled on and configured as a WIFI hotspot for your other devices. Nice. The video is incredible. The network connection is so much better than my gf's AT&T network. The few negatives this phone truly has lies in it's battery and it's price. It has a 6 hour battery but juice sucking apps like video can bring it down to 4. It's a trade-off I will endure. The other is the price. This phone for most costs a nice chunk out of your paycheck ( new contract = $450 - RAPE! ) if you don't already have sprint service but even then if your well within an existing contract with another phone; you don't get a discount and will have to pay the full amount. This pissed me off. Anyways, I love the phone and such systems are only gonna get better. Here's to Droid! A terrific platform. The only thing I need my phone to do now is to plug directly into my head and I won't need a screen to do my bidding.

khiggins1979
khiggins1979

my evo has changed my life. I was embarrassed to tell friends/family that my carrier was sprint 5 years ago. Now they have the best phones the best plans and if this clearwire thing happens, the best coverage. WTG sprint!

Jim_P
Jim_P

Umm, what happened to the Sony X10?

mwalkeden
mwalkeden

What about the HTC Desire (bravo)? It's freakin awesome! The touchscreen is more responsive than my old iPhone 3G and the speed is incredible (1Ghz rocks). I'm looking forward to more apps as 'droid continues to grow

hortonjl
hortonjl

I really enjoy Android 2.2 on my HTC HD2, of course it isn't a native Android phone, but it blows away the Nexus on all benchmarks and is fairly easy to get running.

astenv
astenv

Droid 2 has Verizon crapware.

dcolbert
dcolbert

The problem with this list is on how you divide the phones - by hardware capabilities or by carrier limitations and challenges. If network reliability and performance is your benchmark, then the Verizon phones are going to dominate - on the other hand, if having a unhindered Android experience without carrier limitations is your biggest concern, and you're willing to sacrafice network reliability and performance, the VZW phones are going to drop to the bottom of the pack. Which is *really* the problem, isn't it? Take any one of these phones and put it on Virgin with no data cap, a $40/mo unlimited plan, tethering for no additional charge and pretend Sprint's network were as robust as Verizon, and that would be the Android phone to own. Hopefully one of the carriers is paying attention. (Sent on my Lenovo S-10 using the Virgin 2200 MiFi hotspot).

zstern
zstern

In what sense is the Droid Incredible "less high end" then the Nexus One? It's a Nexus One plus better camera, plus HD video recording, plus more internal storage. It's clearly "more high end" then the Nexus one.

paul.watson
paul.watson

If the discounted, 2-year locked-in price is specified, then the contract requirement must also be specified. Better yet, please specify the pricing for a no-contract, unlocked phone.

hkphooey
hkphooey

I find it hard to comment on your selection without pricing information. Particularly the price of the phone without an associated plan. Some of the Android phones coming out now are low-end and although their features are not the same as the high end models, _for the price_ they can be quite compelling. The HTC Wildfire for example is half the price of the Desire ...

imransi
imransi

Hi, Thanks for this complilation, would you be able to tell me the Indian version of HTC EVO 4G? and if its really the same in all the features etc in the Indian market as well? It would also be great if you can have such list for androids in Indian market. Thanks Imran Siddiqui

skf
skf

Is it good when your pictures cover up the print on your article?

travlerv
travlerv

FYI about the EVO, as its a great phone & I have one, some very common features do not work! Like there are videos on facebook that will not play. Some links that bring you to a windows media file, it will not play. I see older & newer phones play them. For a smart phone, it seems a little dumb there!

Tim Heard
Tim Heard

Nice article Jason. I've been doing a lot of web surfing lately looking for a good smartphone with a full QWERTY keyboard. I own a Blackberry Bold, but am not certain I'm going to upgrade to the torch. I actually am one of the few consumers who would like to see the phones, screens, and especially keyboards, get a little larger. The Epic 4G does look very nice.

cesar.perez
cesar.perez

No Xperia X10 in the states ??? that's a must in any list

farinha
farinha

Hi Does any of these phones synchronize directly (ie., connecting to a PC) with outlook calendar, contacts, notes and tasks? I have been loking for an answer to this for quite a while. Thanks zep

eadams
eadams

I do have to admit that I was a bit surprised to see the "X" that low on the scale. The screen is the same size and quality as the Evo (which rightly deserves the #1 position), but yes it does lack that front-facing camera. As far as horsepower is concerned, this is a beast of a phone - literally and figuratively. I rarely get any lag at all on this thing. We have several guys here at the office that have a few varieties of Droids, and the "X" just screams in comparison. I figured I would have seen this thing around 3rd at the very least ;) All things considered - good review. I love what competition is doing to the Droid market. Now... if we could just get the service providers to stop installing non-removeable (without root) bloatware.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

Great name you have there. And makes me think of 20/20 hindsight :)

tHeSmUrF300
tHeSmUrF300

Doesn't the X10 have performance issues that are related back to problems with the timescrape app? Or has that been fixed? (I just noticed your location as Dubbo....bit of a co-incidence) Cheers Mark

playingwithplato
playingwithplato

The quality of Sprint's network may not be as robust where you live, but where I work, among various Texas cities it is superior to Verizon and T-Mobile. At&T is a joke. Plus I have 4G access on my EVO. With these data speeds every single other phone can't even compare--apples and oranges. I went from a iphone 3G to the EVO and I feel certain Android based phones will soon dominate (with women a recent study showed that the iPhone was the most in demand smart phone, figures, but with men, it was an Android device)

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

An HTC Desire and put it on 3 (UK) with no data cap, a ?20 unlimited plan with tethering for no additional charge. Add the 2.2 mobile hotspot feature and point out that 3's network is robust. That is the Android phone to own and I own it.

MrRich
MrRich

It's not a huge secret that Sprint and Verizon have a roaming agreement. You shouldn't see much of a difference on coverage between the two. Verizon's coverage is actually not as good here in New England according to Consumer Reports. I think Verizon's advertising has been very successful!

susan.davis
susan.davis

The Samsung Epic should be rated much higher than 6 out of 10. In my opinion, and I have used both phones, it ties the Evo. There is a lot to like on the Evo and I fully expected it to be my next phone but after using both phones - I ended up keeping the Epic. After spending significant time with both phones I would have to say most of the pros and cons between the Evo and the Epic come down to personal preference and how you use your phone -- not to one phone being clearly better than the other. The beauty of the display, the processing speed (due largely to how the Epic processes graphics), keyboard and the longer battery life on the Epic were the factors that caused me to choose it over the Evo -- the features on the Evo that I sacrificed were having Android 2.2 right now, greater potential storage space, the camera/flash produced slightly better pictures and the larger screen. I found Touchwiz and Sense equally useful and irritating in their own ways - so they were not a big factor in my decision. To my surprise I had no problem synching with Exchange on the Epic using the email account configuration utility installed on the phone, to do the same on the Evo required installation of fee based third party software. S

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

There's a log more plastic in the Incredible and the design is not as polished. That's what I was referring to. The internals are much the same. I don't expect the Incredible to be as durable.

dkeefer
dkeefer

I found this quite amusing. I run IE as my default browser (not favorite) due to company websites not supporting other browsers. So when this article came up with the pictures covering the text I grinned real wide and chuckled as I fired up the Fox and viewed the article perfectly with FireFox. Nice to see that not all website developers are stuck on IE.

Paul Sim
Paul Sim

I have the Motorola Cliq XT and so far am very pleased with it. The only two issues I have right now is that battery life is horrible. If I don't turn off BlueTooth and GPS and other services, the battery won't make it to the end of the day without charging. I get the impression here that is a common problem with most Android phones. The other issue I have is with Motorola dragging their feet on the upgrade to 2.1 as the CliqXT currently runs 1.5. Overall, however, I am quite pleased.

hkphooey
hkphooey

You might want to look at SyncML. Most phones can do that now and there is a client for Outlook as well. The downside is that, no, its not a direct sync - you need an intermediary server. The upside is that it is well supported, and you can sync more than two devices with it. If your phone can do wireless, then really its a no-brainer.

jgtechie
jgtechie

First, I just switched over to Sprint with an HTC Evo and could not be happier, it's a great phone. I previously had a Blackberry Bold 9700 with AT&T. The PC Sync with the Evo is pretty straight forward, download the software from the Sprint site. It will sync your email, contacts, and calendar. I have not seen an option to sync notes and tasks. Since it's not a Windows based phone, this may not be an option. the new Windows 7 based smart phones may do this.

LedLincoln
LedLincoln

I've had mine for several months, and I can find practically no fault with it. It's super responsive, screen is amazing, apps are great, battery rarely drops below 80% charge (and I don't use any app killer).

dcolbert
dcolbert

Unless I decide to take up wearing a kilt and playing golf religiously. ;) Jason's phone review was clearly US-centric, I think. It is hard for us on this side of the pond to imagine the options that Europeans have with mobile phones and devices.

carljaltman
carljaltman

I'm not sure whether there is any validity to your claim, but I have both the Samsung Epic and the Motorola Droid 2, and I can assure you that the Verizon phone has far superior coverage. I have been a Sprint customer for 11 years, so I decided to get the Epic for my personal phone and stay with Sprint. At the same time, I got a Droid 2 through work, and I carry both phones with me. I have been traveling quite a bit in the last two weeks, and my Epic has very poor coverage in comparison to the Droid 2 and drops calls all the time.

dcolbert
dcolbert

Lots of negative user reviews about Sprint coverage. My own experience with the Virgin MiFi (which explicitly limits roaming, but uses Sprint), is that Sprint's network is not as good as Verizon's. In particular, the Virgin Mobile device limits me ONLY to Sprint towers - in which case, I can say that side by side, my Verizon device tends to outperform my Virgin device on signal strength, speed and throughput, and overall reliability of connection. This isn't absolute, by any means - but in general - I've been with almost all the carriers, and Verizon's is the most solid from coast to coast.

Alz Paul
Alz Paul

The Epic can connect to "Exchange" accounts, but appears not to use Active Sync to accomplish this like the iPhone, HTC Evo, T-Mobile Touch, etc. As a result, you cannot move emails from your inbox to folders in Exchange and turn on the "out-of-office". Exchange emails written using the Epic randomly loose their spacing so paragraphs get strung together. Also, after deleting emails on the Epic, it does not consistently delete them in Exchange (even after refreshing both the phone and the Outlook client). When you click on the Epic Email Settings > Advance Settings > Out-of-office settings, it says "Feature not supported" even though you have the button for it! I am returning the Epic and going to try the HTC Evo.

johnmckay
johnmckay

I use a Blackberry at work and have 100+ notes to keep me focussed. Processes, workarounds, tips etc. It doesn't appear to be a big deal to others but it is for me. I've knocked back an iphone because of this (plus the constant password entry on corporate land), and Android is just the same. I'm really keen to try an Andoid pad for corporate stuff but really do need a direct Notes (and all Office) synch. We had it on the old ipaqs so why not the new kit???

dcolbert
dcolbert

;) I'm not sure with the Kindle. I think it uses WiFi to connect and download books in the States, so you need to find a hotspot if you want to browse and pick something up on the road. Obviously free 3G would have advantages compared to having to track down your nearest Starbucks or McDonald's.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

to take of the Woody costume - that kind of attire don't really go with a kilt :-) Edit - a bit of topic but our Kindles come with free 3G for the downloading of books and browsing the store - is that the same case in the US?

susan.davis
susan.davis

I feel your pain on the MS Integration issue and I miss full hans free operation I had with Windows Mobile as well - but it seems to be an Android trade off. I've used both the EVO and the Epic. The sych between Exchange and EVO was even worse - required a third party app. This was before FROYO but this seems to be an Android issue not a Sense or ThouchWiz issue. Of those with Android phones where I work the DROID users seem to be the happiest with their corporate email features. In all other respects, the EVO and Epic are both great phones and you could not go wrong with either of them A Windows 7 phone may be a better choice for you if a high level of MS integration and full hands free operation are big issues for you. I often use my phone for work and may switch to a Windows 7 phone over these issue as well.

rAllcorn
rAllcorn

With all of these glorified new "toys" (smartphones) there has yet one to come out that can compete with the Blackberry for business!! What is it with notes and tasks? They are a very "VITAL" part of business. Did someone take a stupid pill on this? It's been an established standard for years ... contacts, calendar, tasks, and notes - they go together!! My iPhone 3GS (32GB) broke. I moved to a Blackberry. Loved the features, and the business savvy, but missed the smartphone features terribly. The iPhone did not have tasks or notes, so I decided to go "Open Source" with the Android (runs LINUX). Same deal, unfortunately. I've been able to get a "Tasks" app that sync's with Google, but to date only Tomboy Notes is available for the Android, and you can't edit/enter data on the device yet - it only downloads your stuff from the Internet. So, the Blackberry - as far as business use - still rates #1! These neat little apps I've got are fantastic, don't get me wrong, but when you forget "the basics", you've messed up!

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