iPhone

Majority of CIOs still reject the iPhone, but resistance is weakening

IT departments initially rejected the iPhone as not fit for business, but IT leaders are starting to change their tune. See how TechRepublic's CIO Jury voted.

When the Apple iPhone was released in 2007, CIOs and IT departments almost universally rejected it as a device that was not fit for business. Two years later, with the third generation of iPhone hardware now on the market, Microsoft Exchange support available, and an active ecosystem of third party applications, many CIOs are beginning to warm up to the iPhone.

On August 4, TechRepublic polled its group of U.S. IT leaders and asked, "Does your IT department support the iPhone as an approved device?" The jury, made up of the first 12 respondents, had seven IT chiefs who said "no" and five who said "yes."

TechRepublic's CIO Jury is based on the original CIO Jury concept developed by Silicon.com, where you can find lively opinions from IT leaders based in the UK.

Our CIO Jury in this case was:

  1. Brian Terry, Vice President of IT for Constitution Corporate Federal Credit Union
  2. Chuck Musciano, CIO of Martin Marietta Materials
  3. Thomas Galbraith, Director of IT for US District Court So District of IL
  4. Jeff Relkin, Director of IT for Quadel
  5. Chuck Elliott, IT Director of Emory University School of Medicine
  6. Steve Shead, IT Director of Cafepress
  7. Michael Stoyanovich, CIO of Benesys
  8. Chris Brown, Vice President of Technology at Big Splash Web Design
  9. Matthew Metcalf, Director of IS for Northwest Exterminating
  10. Gary Wolf, Director of IT for Free Methodist Church of North America
  11. Scott Lowe, CIO for Westminster College
  12. Adam Bertram, IT Director of McKendree Village

So, 42% of these CIOs now support the iPhone and many of them offered interesting commentary on why they do or don't allow the iPhone. In fact, we have comments from many other IT leaders in the 90-member panel, beyond just the 12 that made up the jury.

Representing the iPhone holdouts, Musciano said, "I am still not convinced that the iPhone is secure enough for enterprise deployment. The various vulnerabilities exposed in just the past week make me even less likely to consider the iPhone for the enterprise any time soon."

On the other side was Mike Wagner, CIO of Stone & Youngberg in San Francisco, who reported:

The iPhone is one of the most innovative and revolutionary end-user products developed in the last 5 years. Like most IT Departments, we boycotted the first release of the iPhone but the subsequent release that supported [Exchange] ActiveSync was a game changer for corporate IT. Over the last several years we have supported mobile OSes from Palm, Blackberry, and Microsoft. The support and training requirements for the iPhone are orders of magnitude less than the mobile OSes offered by competing vendors. Another big plus of supporting the iPhone is the general excitement and enthusiasm from the end users and a corresponding decrease in the perception that IT is a wet blanket that is an impediment to the use of consumer-friendly products. Overall, implementing and supporting the iPhone has been an incontrovertible win for the IT department and end users.

Below is an additional selection of comments from the IT leaders, divided into the "yes" and "no" voters.

Yes

  • "It's actually been a great device for the IT group itself, used to remotely manage servers and other tools. The sales folks love it, and it has so far been less of a support issue than the other phones." (Edward Beck, Vice President of IT for Line 6, Inc.)
  • "We have found that resistance is futile. The iPhone is the most popular handheld device available. It has the best mobile browser and our sysadmins say it is a great device for remote systems administration." (Ed Sefton, CIO of Commonwealth Financial Network)
  • "Utilizing the iPhone for traveling executives has cut down on VPN support considerably. Executives don't need to VPN as much to conduct regular business operations." (Nicholas Dibble, CIO of BuyOnlineNow)
  • "Why deny the undeniable. It is simply the best mobile platform available. It offers a cutting edge GUI that delivers a superior customer experience." (Michael Boyle, CIO of Allstate)
  • "We only provide full support for the C level execs' Blackberries (3 total). For everyone else, we will allow them to sync a Blackberry or iPhone on a effort-as-available basis. As IT chief, I have an iPhone." (Bob Hickcox, Director of IT for Girl Scouts of MN and WI)
  • "Yes, but as with all personally purchased handheld devices, support is limited. We will help users connect to our Exchange server, but if the device has problems, they're responsible for getting it fixed." (Jeanne DeVore, Head of IT for Chicago Shakespeare Theater)
  • "Yes, in fact, it's our preferred device." (Scott Lowe, CIO for Westminster College) Also, see Scott's TechRepublic article Out with Treos, in with iPhones on why his organization recently adopted the iPhone.
  • "The 3G iPhones are integrating well into our network. End users are very happy with the performance." (Matthew Metcalfe, Director of IS for Northwest Exterminating)
  • "Although we don't supply them as a standard offering, we will interface any privately purchased iPhones with our corporate systems." (Jeff Relkin, Director of IT for Quadel)

No

  • "We still view the iPhone as a personal device, not a business device." (Kurt Schmidt, IT Director of Capital Credit Union)
  • "iPhones are not supported because they are considered personal gadgets." (Lisa Moorehead, Director of IT for MA Dept of Public Utilities)
  • "For business purposes we have yet to see any advantage the iPhone has over Blackberry. Thus far Blackberry has been easier for us from a change management/helpdesk management perspective. Less change means less cost and that's a key driver for us in the current economic environment." (Jeff Cannon, CIO of Fire and Life Safety America)
  • "Due to the ease of management that comes with using a BES, Blackberries are our only supported devices. We will show our users how to access email on their iPhones just like we do for Windows Mobile devices but after that, they're on their own." (Rob Paciorek, CIO of Access Intelligence, LLC)
  • "I do not support it at this time. The only reason is because we're on an older version of Exchange. If I was more up-to-date, I would support it with tight security measures." (Donna Porter, Corporate Director of IT for Evans Hotels)
  • "No, although that is because AT&T is not available here. There are some excellent medical apps for iPhones which are well worth exploring." (Jerry Horton, CIO of Bob Wilson Memorial Hospital in Ulysses, KS)
  • "No, because we have had bad coverage from AT&T." (David Wilson, Director of IT for VectorCSP in Elizabeth City, NC)
  • "Due to service problems with AT&T in our area it is not a viable option." (Joel Robertson, Director of IT for King College in Bristol, TN)
  • "No. However, we are finding more and more of our users are buying and using the device without assistance from IT." (Chuck Elliott, IT Director for Emory University School of Medicine)

In June, Silicon.com asked its group of U.K IT chiefs if they planned to offer the iPhone as an official corporate device and only one out of twelve said "yes." Even though their question was a little bit different (since it focused on deploying the iPhone as an official corporate device), the comparison is interesting.

Would you like to be part of TechRepublic's CIO Jury and have your say in the hottest issues for IT departments? If you are a CIO, CTO, IT director or equivalent at a large or small company in the private or public sector and you want to be part of TechRepublic's CIO Jury pool, drop us a line at ciojury@techrepublic.com.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

87 comments
T_J_L
T_J_L

The iPhone is about fun. It's not a productivity tool. It has productivity capabilities, but that's not it's purpose. If you could get a Game Boy or PSP with phone and data capabilities I wouldn't want that in use on my network either. The Blackberry is designed for productivity, corporate connectivity, and is the best there is at it. If I want fun and games, and the ability to make a phone call too, I'll look at an iPhone. If I want to connect to the corporate network, not a chance.

ricardoc
ricardoc

I just got off a web meeting about iPhone's readiness for the Enterprise. Yeahh, right! Just check the following questions I made an their answers: 1. Q: Outlook integration (no Exchange)? A: Nope. Do they really think every business can afford Exchange? 2. Q: SSL-VPN? A: Nope. That's a common request. (Oh! it is a common request? What are you waiting for then?) 3. Q: Can I enable the phone without iTunes? A: No, iTunes is necessary for updates, tethering, and syncing. (iTunes? Really? Yew! I hate iTunes and all the crap that comes with it. It is already bad enough controlling the amount of crapware that users want to have in their computers) So no, it is not ready for business, at least not for mine. Ricardo.

Derteufel
Derteufel

One is a mapple fanatic, the other just loves the phone. The fanatic lives with it though he calls us weekly for help with this and that. The other gave up on it after 2 weeks. His words were "its a fun toy, but its not reliable for business use for me, I want my blackberry back". The Blackberry with BES has been unmatched for us. Its straight forward once its up and the few issues we have are the same everytime and not often. BES is more tighly integrated with Exchange that iPhone exchange support.

MH101
MH101

I just switched over to the iPhone 3Gs from my Blackberry curve and I love it! This is my first Apple product I have ever owned and don't regret it one bit. In fact, We just ordered 7 more for all of the Attorneys in our Firm. Once they saw me with it using it and noticed the features and the simple GUI interface that my 10 year son can understand - they were intrigued. There is no added software for the iphones, they simply sync without any issues and have given me less headaches then the BB's they replaced. I can control them through my Exchange and no need for the Blackberry enterprise server anymore. One less app on my Server makes me happy. And the iphone is certainly a business device... anyone who thinks otherwise is a HATER... There is an app (QucikOffice)that allows you to read, write, and save any Office doc (powerpoint, excel, word) and transfer it through WiFi, including PDFs and different media. Have you ever tried reading those docs on a BB? Very hard to do... If I have to look something up, I'd rather use my iphone than my Alenware laptop. The browsing capability is great and the speed is just as fast and more portable. All the extra apps are a huge plus! The question is: how is the iphone not a business device. I have to admit, it took a few weeks to get used to the keyboard and touch screen overall, but once I did, I enjoy it better than typing on the BB. I was doubtful when they first came on the scene, however, Apple has listened to the business client and is trying to compete with Blackberry.

micbra
micbra

In an "offhand" manner we are testing the waters. We are starting to make sales and marketing material available for our sales teams via podcasts. If this becomes and accepted as a useful way of delivering information then I think it will be a natural progression to accept the iPhone because it will be a convenient mobile phone and device to get e-mail, internal podcasts and other business related material that no other device can achieve with as much ease (that I've seen anyway). A big concern though is the added cost for data - especially costs for international data. The iPhone data plans tend to be more expensive than their competitors.

MPG187
MPG187

I reject it and always will until you can run third party software without having apple's approval, like you can on Windows Mobile and Android (I assume, I never used it but I am sure it does because it's open source.)

Al_nyc
Al_nyc

While the iPhone is stuck with AT&T things will not improve. More than fancy apps, good phone service is important. AT&T's phone service leaves a lot to be desired. If iPhone was on Verizon, then lots of business users would switch.

chaimn
chaimn

Let me start by saying that I switched from my personal BB to the iPhone (3Gs) after years of using the BB. My major findings after using it for a week include: - Security is weak and will not pass many organizations minimum requirements. -The applications are too simple, delivering minimum business functionality; not enough for many organizations. -The devise OS is simple, not too many usage options to customize. -It?s not always easy to use; Usability depends on the application design not the hardware. -If you need real content pull/push, collaboration, sharing, syncing, you need to subscribe to MobileMe (additional paid service). -And let?s not start to talk about the Keyboard and battery life?I miss my BB keyboard. I was very close to switching back to the BB. I felt that the lack of functionality and true collaboration with Outlook/SharePoint will actually reduce my productivity, but? I got a pretty toy, nice for game playing, and some nice 3rd party applications, which makes me feel good?and I can get my email and some appointments information on it. Chaim Nudell Enterprise Architect 973-280-8320 cnudell@gmail.com http://www.linkedin.com/in/chaimnudell

Neil Leacy
Neil Leacy

1. You don't have to install Itunes software on a users PC to enable the phone 2. You can fully control the downloading and installation of Apps 3. You don't have to install Itunes software on a users PC to enable the phone 4. It has a much longer battery life, without requiring an additional peripheral 5. You don't have to install Itunes software on a users PC to enable the phone 6. Runs MS applications 7. You don't have to install Itunes software on a users PC to enable the phone 8. You can fully edit MS Office 2003 and 2007 documents Oh, and ... 9. You don't have to install Itunes software on a users PC to enable the phone How anyone in their right mind can allow the use of a phone that requires a music download related piece of software to be installed on a business PC is beyond me. It is bad enough asking people NOT to install it for their iPlayers. It is simply not a business tool. Neil

travis.duffy
travis.duffy

With the numerous security vulnerabilities and lack of device encryption the iphone is not secure enough for my environment

richard.wilson
richard.wilson

*as Hiner skips to the bank with yet another check from Apple* Jason's Daily Itinerary -Promote Apple products -Bash Microsoft -Promote Apple products -Promote Apple products -Promote the "cloud" -Promote Apple products -Enjoy the slow slide to irrelevancy (if there's enough time in the day) -Bash Microsoft -Bash Microsoft -Bash Microsoft -Make sure enough bloggers on TR are bashing Microsoft

JohnOfStony
JohnOfStony

It's resistance, NOT resistence!!! Nothing hits harder than a blatant spelling mistake in a large font coloured (bold?) title. Spelling checkers are inherent in most Word Processors. Why not use one? I remember seeing a placard for headlamp protectors in a car dealership. The heading read "AVIOD HEADLAMP DAMAGE". It astonishes me how such blatant errors get approved at all levels from the original misspeller to the printer. OK, with electronic publishing, there's probably only the original misspeller involved, but all the more reason to use a spell checker. And while we're on the subject of English, please use apostrophes correctly - it's not difficult. Also please make the verb agree with the subject. e.g. the goverment has decided, NOT the government have decided.

gary
gary

CIO may not like it but the user community is driving the train. If CIO were driving it, computers would be secure, predictable and controllable. In fact, computers would be mainframes. Now, who in the user community would want that?

ozgurgul
ozgurgul

IPhone is the sports car and others are serious(!) stuff, as a network administrator i prefer sports cars and casual wear, so yea i can do all the action bussiness require by an iphone, security issues? Use ssl in mail traffic and encrypted APN for data transfer. Is there anything i m missing out?

a.southern
a.southern

The iPhone, looks great, has some nice features (most of which are available on the Sony Erikson P900i in 2004), but it's still just a toy. Even it's adverts on TV are a complete joke! "Now you can Cut and Paste!" -breakthrough! "There's an App for that, it's that easy!" (subtitle says "steps removed") -brilliant, you've simplified down a process to make it look easy in an advert that shows you how easy it is? I wouldn't take a business seriously if it's major IT was an Apple Mac/iMac/whatever they call them now, why would I think the iPhone is anything but a girl's toy? Buy a "dangle" or a HTC, they are more serious, more manly, and you don't look like an Apple IT illiterate! -AS

limmartin
limmartin

Hi all, what do you think the impact will be when the 32GB IPHONE 3Gs is out? It boasts to be faster than the current ones (better processor). Would this change CIOs' minds? It changed mine:). I used to own the 1st gen and boy it slows down a lot when playing games. Having said that, I am still holding on to my BB. Its not to be compared with the IPHONE. IPHONE is simply THE fun phone (in my opinion). Comparing to the 1st gen, there is so many enhancements. I've switched to a NOKIA phone in replacement for my exercise phone (the 1st gen Iphone), it's just not the same. Now I've ordered the IPHONE 3GS and looking forward to using it as my fun phone again. ANyone already owns one now, please share your experience with the 3Gs edition...Thanks

a.southern
a.southern

Well said! Get these Nazi companies out of here which don't let people develop their own stuff. It stifles creativity, and doesn't actually make the platforms any more secure. -AS

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Bots scour this site for email addresses to add to spam lists. Using a full signature like that just opens yuo wide up to problems,

uberg33k50
uberg33k50

Make another annoying worthless video.

mjc5
mjc5

Fascinating that people cannot say anything good about Apple without being accused of being paid off by them. Sorry, I don't think Jason has ever said anything untrue. but lol? Are you an AOL customer?

dreron
dreron

However I may find my self in a similar position, as my native tongue is not English; given that is really annoying no matter what the language is. You could also user Firebox with a dictionary, easy and simple.

rl-ns
rl-ns

There is a sign up on our noticeboard titled "Fire and Safety Advise" :-)

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

It is a VERY common thing to misspell large banners, street-side signs etc. purposely to attract attention. It's been done for years and proven to catch the eye more than the correct spelling....well it caught yours anyway. That may or may not be the issue in your case, but it is a proven advertising angle all the same. As for spelling in forums in general, I don't other spell checking anything, I might redo a few words if it is really bad but honsetly I couldn't give a toss if anyone likes it or not, it's just an internet forum, not actual work or real life.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

The demand to get information published as quickly as possible has reduced the layers of copyediting in every publishing field. Nevertheless, I worked in the old system with more layers of copyediting and we still regularly published errors like "aviod" and "resistence" - but it print you can't go in and correct it after the fact. ;-) The error you mentioned is fixed now. The problem in this case is that spellcheck is not turned on by default in the Headline field of updated our content management system.

tex rex
tex rex

if the users were getting everything they wanted or thought they needed, the sales guys would be requesting porsches and big bonuses.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

How about application compatibility? With most offices these days usign MS Office or Outlook etc., i-Phone falls flat on it's cheaply constructed face. How about an ability to quickly edit and share such documents? Again i-Phone doesn't cut it. i-Phone is so limited that it doesn't even come close to being a worthy "business device" but for the toy collector, gadget junkie and trend follower, i-Phone is great solution/toy. In this case we are talking business applications, remember also that sales staff, business development staff etc. require a lot more functionality than i-Phone does, even if the IT guys like to stick with what's cool.

rl-ns
rl-ns

I agree, Apple is a marketing company. They repackage off the shelf components and convince people they should buy them. Mac computer = standard MB, Intel CPU, ... RAM, Hard Drive.. BSD based OS(cost them nothing) and a small shim which has some eyecandy.. and a case... For which you pay upto double the cost of a similar spec PC (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRrVo6f7r1k) iphone is a similarly overpriced bunch of standard components.. oh, except they have switched off apps you might need, such as tethering. Oh, and I will probably have less respect for a business iphone user - who believed the hype enough to part with nearly ?1000 because it is shiny :-)

Slvrknght
Slvrknght

You know, I've long hated the debate between Mac Fanboys and Windows Fanboys. I happen to prefer Macs because I like the interface better, but I can do just as much on my Mac that I can on my PC (truth be told, my standard system is a Linux box). Saying that using an Apple product in the IT world makes one illiterate is both rude, and extremely short-sighted. Personally, I hate the iPhone (and almost all smartphones for that matter) because I'm never anywhere I can't pull out my laptop and get ten times the functionality and usability. Can't we all stop the hatred? Why must we fight over which system is better (more girly/whatever)? P.S. Linux Rules. (For those unable to appreciate ironic humor, you may want to skip this post script.)

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

If you need a device to to that then you have a problem I would say!

steverussell2
steverussell2

once verizon accepts the apple tablet, Iphone is next. If the apple tablet gets wide user acceptance, which is expectd, especially on verizon 4g network it is only a matter of time before a version of the Iphone is available. One/two punch for users to get one/other or both. Business will be next. I maybe wrong but will be willing to bet on this happening. Apple not totally happy with ATT. Verizon better able to use all appliations of Iphone than ATT. Just that simple.

MH101
MH101

They have improved alot! You have to own one to really appreciate the superb engineering and user friendly interface. The iPhone can be a sufficient business tool for most, but don't hate it if you haven't owned one. I was a loyal bb user but as we started getting more users, the cost for a bes license was getting old. It's a matter of preference and it's great for technology and competition. I now depend on my iPhone for work and play. Exchange 07 locks all seven of the iPhone 3gs by default and is very easy to apply settings to users devices with wirelessly syncing mail cals and contacts with no license....

a.southern
a.southern

"and boy it slows down a lot when playing games." Playing games, the iPhone is a TOY. Not a business tool.

rl-ns
rl-ns

Seriously, I can read much faster than YOU speak :-|

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Perhaps a North American wrote it and was trying to use British spellings which often use an S as opposed to a C used in North America. :D

rl-ns
rl-ns

Phew we haz covred uup us spellings not goods

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

need to remember that one for the future typos I make!

MH101
MH101

Business apps are available for the iPhone - LOOK up Quickoffice, QuickVoice, and Print and Share - these are a small handful of apps availabe for the iPhone that I use and my clients almost use everyday.

Deanbar
Deanbar

Documents to Go by Dataviz enables you to synchronise MS Word, Excel, Powerpoint files, as well as to read and edit, create new files. I had this on my old Palm and it worked brilliantly, as it also does on the iPhone and iPod Touch. In addition you can also sync, read and edit OpenOffice files, retaining the original formats. Whilst the iPhone may not yet cover all business areas 100%, it is moving along quite nicely. So you're comments are way out of date, please keep up.

clynch
clynch

That's a unqiue perspective. I've been a Blackberry power user for the last five years. I now have an iPhone 3GS and it destroys the Blackberry in terms of functionality and ease of use. RIM has a lot of catching up to do. No Outlook integration? It's far easier and more efficient to send emails and attachments than on a Blackberry. It also integrates with the Exchange directory in a more powerful and intuitive manner than the Blackberry. In fact, everything that I was able to do on the Bold, I can now do it more effectively on the iPhone. I would recommend you try the device in an enterprise context before making specious comments.

marcel
marcel

It is so funny how this argument is tossed around by those that seem to imply they are more technology literate than the rest of us. If one truly believes that Macs are nothing more than a standard PC with a pretty case, then it just shows how little they really know. Like Giampaolo on the PC commercial, "I'm really picky." Yeah, sure you are. If so, you're picky about the wrong things. A computer is more than the sum of its parts. How much is it worth to not need to worry about viruses and spyware? Will it be worth it after you've paid more than once or twice to get rid of the malware - after spending a bunch of money on anti-virus software that didn't work? Ok, you can fix viruses yourself. Is your time worth so little? Or how much is it worth to use a computer that allows you to get more done in less time? How much is it worth to use a computer that you swear BY instead of swear AT? Does quality count for anything? Do you think Mercedes, BMW, Porsche, or Ferrari are just "repackaged" cars, too? I wonder how many who make this argument have actually used a Mac for any appreciable amount of time? It is amusing to see how many self-professed Mac "haters" quickly change their tune after getting an opportunity to actually test drive one for a week or two. As someone who is both Microsoft and Apple certified and who supports and services both types of computers, I see it all. And more and more of my customers are switching to Macs for the reasons I state above. After 3 or 4 PCs, they are sick and tired of dealing with headaches. They certainly could have chosen again to buy a PC and possibly have spent less (although not a lot less), but instead they have chosen to pay for a more valuable computer this time.

a.southern
a.southern

"Illiterate and Rude"? "I can do just as much on my Mac that I can on my PC"? I'm willing to bet that Apple Mac Design Office use PCs, for the simple reason that no proper 3D design software (e.g. ProE, Catia, SolidEdge or Solidworks) will work on a Mac in native interface. -AS

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

It most certainly does, it 'rules' almost 12% of the market! :D 12%, that would be enough to win a US election wouldn't it? (For those unable to get a simple joke, you may want to ignore.)

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Loser. it was all looking so good as well.

a.southern
a.southern

The only men in UK with pink laptops are politicians who buy them on expenses about the time of their daughter's birthdays! Why? Maybe because pink laptopns function well but aren't quite as manly. Do I have problems with my mascalinity because my laptop is grey? No! -AS

a.southern
a.southern

I don't think they have so many problems in the UK as they are on O2 here, and O2 look after their customers. I think a lot of businesses are actually on Vodafone or Orange though. Lots of people buy a PAYG iPhone and then sell the PAYG sim on eBay. The O2 iPhone PAYG sim comes with 1 years free internet usage, and free local area calls. -AS

Al_nyc
Al_nyc

Verizon has a nasty habit of cutting phone features so that they can charge you extra money. So it would not surprise me if they try to cripple the iPhone to maximize their profit potential.

limmartin
limmartin

right you are mate. that's the reason why i still have my BB for business. "all work but no play makes jim a dull man.." once in a while, its great to be able to play games, surf the net, listen to music, browse pictures, watch movies and more on the iphone. I did all that on iphone; only pain was the speed..

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

There's a big difference between the two really. I have poor typing skills, I learned trades in school nto keyboarding (which was only a typing class as computers were in Vic20 the stages back then). Tyops and spelieng mistaks are quite different though. I orphan letter salot. I reveres letters alot. I hit the wronh key a lot. My spelling is actually very good though, but typing is not mu bag at all, especially when using my muck about notebook that is missing a couple fo keys (not worth the $120.00 for a new keyboard, they don't make keycaps for it either). My most common ones are 'but' instead of 'buy', 'teh' instead of 'the' and 'mroe' instead of 'more' or words that end in 'ing' get spelled 'ign'. When I am writing copy, I do fix those, if not editors catch what I didn't. In a forum like this, I don't care nor pay attention, unless I am having a good conversation and the person I am talking to warrants me taking some time to correct such issues. Living in Canada I see mroe than my fair share of actual misspellings due to foreign signage. The most common is oriental signs that don't use plural, "SALE, all cassette tape and CD 50% off" Or East Indian signs where words are spelled phonetically or have more than one speling. "SAIL, all casets and cd's are 50% off"

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Despie recent add-ons that you can purchase from thw Apple approved i-toystore, superior devices have been available and in use for several years now, using FAR better touch tech that an old IR screen with multitouch chips added to it, the fact that i-Toys are catching up makes them a viable alternative? Following doesn't make one a leader nor cutting edge, it's all been done before and a lot more, Apple still sucks hind teet in this industry. God I saw better devices from Janam 5 years ago, whtn they were new to the industry! Go find an Apple fanboys forum to giggle about your toys, until i-Toys can touch a Motorola MC-73 in Enterprise functionality, I'll pass. Sure the i-Toy is cheap as hell in comparison but it pales to the invisible in usability too. You can't even use a stylus and never will be able to unless they get with the program and realize why IR failed to compete to begin with. No handwritign recognition, document editing and sharing is minimal at best, the camera sux bag, video is a thing of dreams, can I edit and build my Power Point templates on the plane? No thanks. Just the simple fact that you mention OO describes exactly what portion of the marketplace your needs are in. If I was limited to OO I wouldn't be able to do my job and would lose clients by the handful in a heartbeat. If you worked with some of the companies I've sold more worthy devices to, you'd be unemployed in weeks. Limited functionality doesn't cut it. It's a joke of a device for business, no matter how many pre approved upgrades and add-ons they sell you. If you can't simply develop and offer 3rd party software for download without the manufacturer's approval, it hardly qualifies for the SmartPhone market. Can I integreate if with Maximizer? Fox Pro? Act? WIll it synch with my office apps? Nope sorry, its not designed for business, it's just techs that think that if it suits their needs it is a business device. One day they MAY catch up, if they rebuild the whole device from the screen down, until then it's just something to play with, like wearing dad's shoes and playing office.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I used to work closely with Symbol/Motorola designers in helping them develop rugged hand held devices long before the i-Toy was ever a seed. The vast majority of businesses tpday still US MS Office, and users rely on Outlook calndars, scheduling synchronizing etc. Any device such as Apples i-Toy, where you are forced to buy software tha THEY must approve, is not an enterprise worthy device. Besides the touch technology being an adaptation on a weak and ineffective touch system, they bought out a failing company that couldn't keep up with the bigger players like ELO/Tyco, the usaility of the device is so incredibly limited. Mind you, I find blackberry's weak for real integration too. Sure you can get your email and text as needed, maybe add the odd compatible program but they are weak and limited, not to mention flimsy as hell. A sales rep, sales manager etc. requires a hell of a lot more than email and text/web capabilities in order to work effectively. Eve Apple doesn't pretend the i-Toy is a business device anymore. Fun for kiddies and gadget junkies, but not worthy of much else.

a.southern
a.southern

I'd love to know what software and platform Apple design their computers and phones on? My guess would be Catia or ProE or NX on a WinNT based system. Why aren't apple advertising what they use instead of having Bono and Enimem say "Hey, if you're young cool and trendy like us, prove how much of a rebel you are by wearing your pants backwards and buying a small piece of corporate america!" Time was, people bought Macs to stop Gates being Universal leader of the world. Now I'd buy anything other than Macs to stay clear of Al Gore and his huge empire of hypocrites! -AS

MPG187
MPG187

Nuff said. Why did you call your reply "so what's the point?"

a.southern
a.southern

Why would I realise Macs run Windows? I wouldn't touch a Mac, yet alone try and listen to the a shear amount of rubbish advertising they put out. Surely they are still doing the whole "Microsoft copied Icons concept from us therefore we're better" whinge? Why would I pay 50% more for a machine to run XP on? I don't have loyalty to XP or Linux or any of the brands of machine they run on. I firmly believe if you stand there and say "Hey, I'll only EVER buy Dell/HP/IBM" you'd get laughed out of the room. Rightly so. So should all these Apple Mac fanboys that say "Ohhhhh..... Steve Jobs, brilliant, I'll only EVER buy a Mac.....". It's not hatred, it's loathing of so called professionals who are swayed by product endorcements by Enimem and Bono, "If they are paid buy it, it must be good, so I'll base my entire IT policy on the say so of an expert like Bono who clearly knows about IT because he's a singer." I'd be more open to mac if they did the following: 1. Stopped forcing people to buy from their own shop. - Do I buy all my washing powder from Hoover? 2. Stopped the Celebrity Endorsements - Complete waste of money passed onto end users 3. Stopped advertising all the time - Just one advert break without a iPhone advert please (see above for cost arguement) 4. Got rid of those STUPID 1 button mice - Maybe Mac users have flippers, but I'd like a five button mouse. 5. With their cost savings, lower the prices of their machines. - They are expensive for what they can do. 6. Allowed independant software development without having to use back doors or get permission. 7. LISTENED to what customers actually wanted. - See above and think "Cut and Paste"/"MMS" Granted several of those points have been rectified already, but when it's more important they advertise "there's a spirit level app" than tell you the important stuff like "we're not so crap anymore" then something's wrong at their head office. I've seen CAD software run on Playstation3's I've never seen CAD software run on a Mac. Why is that?

MPG187
MPG187

Macs run Windows because they are PCs, therefore you can run Mac OS on a PC. Apple doesn't want you to do that because if a Mac runs both then it's "the only computer you will ever need" and therefore Macs are more expensive.

Slvrknght
Slvrknght

You keep thinking that. Why is there so much hatred? You do realize that Mac's run Windows now, right? It's more like monkeys chained to computers (if what a friend of mine says is true). He's scared to death of meeting Steve Jobs.

MPG187
MPG187

It rules. I don't care about Market share, I care about how good it is.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Still tracking my posts? I just didn't know if it was that self explanatory or if I was talking to Santeewelding and needed to pull out my Batman decoder ring.

jdclyde
jdclyde

where you just commented on this guy posted the linux rules..... seemed a natural. Guess you are wittier by accident, huh? ;\ [i](cross thread, to carry topics across different discussions)

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I wear boxer briefs not panties. Sorry, but I missed the joke on that one, even though you added a smiley face.

Slvrknght
Slvrknght

Who cares about higher ground? Wait, that's mostly my call to arms after 6 or so beers. I was once a one-man wrecking machine, then my boss told me I had to play nice with the end users. Dammit!

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

where? Where is the offending funny that failed to tickle the ribs. Perhaps it is also worth pointing out that you ended your post with a similar insult. (wahhhhh! you say) Good for you, but that now puts you in the same boat, lets sail. This is great as you lost the so called higher ground on which you thought you once sat on the post before this post. I'm no joker, no. Just a one man wrecking machine baby, yeah!

Slvrknght
Slvrknght

Or else you would realize that people can place jokes, such as I did, as Post scripts. You really think that I would have written that entire thing and then said something so decidedly stupid without it being a joke? You are a sad little man.

a.southern
a.southern

Vodafone sold an iPhone clone called the Blackberry storm, and I think it's the first Blackberry where you've not had Wifi. "Never mind, you can buy your data from us, so long as you aren't abroad!"

jdavis
jdavis

Getting off subject here, but nothing gets my blood boiling more than Verizon's monopolistic tendencies. Yes, they like to disable the built-in capabilitis of the devices on their network to interface directly with other devices. They want to FORCE you to transfer data over their network rather than offer truly value added services that would be willingly used and payed for. But I digress. What ever happened with the FCC VHF spectrum auction? I know that at least initially, the FCC wanted to make it a requirement that whoever purchased this space allowed third-party devices to connect to their networks.

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