Smartphones

New data shows Android winning market share from iPhone

Quantcast released its latest report of mobile Web usage by OS on Monday and it showed a big jump for Android, and a significant dip for iPhone.

Quantcast released its latest report of mobile Web usage by OS in North America on Monday and it showed a big jump for Android, and a significant dip for iPhone.

As you can see in the chart below, in terms of the share of mobile devices that access the Web, Android OS is up on on monthly, quarterly, and annual basis. Meanwhile, Apple iOS (the new name for iPhone OS) is down on a percentage basis over all three periods. RIM's BlackBerry OS was up for the quarter but down on a monthly and yearly basis, and all other smartphone platforms combined were down as a percentage for all three metrics.

In terms of the trend line, you can see iPhone slowly ceding some of its commanding lead since January 2009, while Android has been on a consistent climb since the release of the Motorola Droid and the Android 2.0 OS in October 2009.

Still, when you look at the overall picture, Apple iOS devices (iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch) have a larger share of mobile Web consumption than all other mobile devices combined, and nearly triple the amount for Android. That said, these numbers were also released before two new very popular Android devices--the HTC Incredible and the HTC EVO 4G--have fully impacted the market. Apple's iPhone 4 will certainly challenge those two devices but there are now Android smartphones on all four major carriers in the U.S. while the iPhone remains limited to AT&T. That will continue to allow Android to outflank iPhone until Apple takes it to additional carriers.

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Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

14 comments
sterlingoz80
sterlingoz80

According to Bloomberg, Android have 57% of the market share for smartphones in Japan. I believe the Apple has 38% with the iPhone. ??????????????? ??????

Lazarus439
Lazarus439

It's not clear how, or if, some of these figures take into account there were already an awful lot of iSomethings on the wild before the first Android Something passed it's first electron. The chart of "web consumption" (aside: if the web is being consumed, how long until we run out of it?) is the best example. It would be absolutely amazing, not to mention probably impossible, if Android devices didn't rank far below iThings. Another variable is that one has to put up with AT&T to get an iPhone. I know people who have AT&T phones and the phone service is terrible; I can't fathom how bad the data site must be. (I'm in Las Vegas (Nevada) so it's not a matter of being in the middle of nowhere). If/when the iPhone shows up on another US carrier, like Verizon, so there's some head to head competition on a level field, we'll really know something about which OS people like better.

gavin142
gavin142

will never have an iPhone, at least as long as they're shackled to AT&T service (and I don't particularly like the idea of Jailbreaking, that's opened too many security issues). (aside: I would dearly love to know what kind of sweetheart deal they gave Jobs so that he agreed to tie his new baby exclusively to the provider with the (IMHO) worst wireless service and customer service in the country).

Ronn Hanley
Ronn Hanley

That is the ONLY thing keeping me from getting an iPhone. Call me a snob, but AT&T has a bushel basket of issues that make them unpalatable. Guess when I upgrade I'll go ahead and get the HTC I've been drooling over...

rtrujillo
rtrujillo

...are waiting for the new iPhone. Wait until the end of July.

yobtaf
yobtaf

Competition is good. I've been waiting to see if other wireless carriers were going to offer the iPhone but the G4 cinched the deal. iPhone here I come.

marthill
marthill

I think you need to take Quantcast's figures with a pinch of salt. Just a few days back, Net Applications announced that the iPhone actually gained more mobile browser share than Android in May, going from 30.3% to 32.8%. In the same timeframe, Android went from 5.3% to only 6.2%. Likewise, the iPad in only two months has already captured more marketshare than all Android devices put together as measured by Morgan Stanley. In terms of installed base, Nielsen reports that the iPhone outnumbered Android by three to one (28% vs 9%) in the USA during q1 2010. In Australia where every carrier has the iPhone and offer a whole range of competitive plans, the iPhone has captured 40% of the smartphone market and is only 5% behind Symbian according to IDC in March 2010 and closing fast. Of course since iPod Touches almost double Apple's marketshare (not to mention the just released iPad), iOS is already by far and away the largest mobile OS on this continent. In contrast Android has only captured a measly 2.1 percent. In Japan, the iPhone has captured an astounding 72% of the smartphone market after pundits predicted it would fail due to not having emoji and other Japanese-specific curios. Remember, the iPhone is still outselling Android 2 to 1 worldwide even though many users are holding off for the release of iPhone 4 and the iPad is still not available everywhere worldwide. There are 100 million iOS devices out there today and approximately 10 million Android devices and worldwide Gartner indicates that 8.4 million iPhones were sold last quarter vs 5.2 million phones from all Android manufacturers combined, so the gap is only growing wider by the day. -Mart

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Thanks for adding some global perspective. I'm very aware of the Japan numbers, but hadn't seen recent mobile market share data from Australia. Very interesting stuff. By the way, TechRepublic has a great group of Aussie members!

eM DuBYaH
eM DuBYaH

I got my my hands on the new HTC Evo, I'm in love with Android. (THIS PHONE IS AWWWWESOME!) My g'friend has an iPhone, and after checking out my new toy, she says she has phone envy!

dcolbert
dcolbert

It is still Android underneath - and you'll find that if you use it to the full potential of a smart-phone, the very strength of the open market is a liability in decreasing, Windows OS like performance and increasing stability issues over time. By the time you've installed a couple dozen programs and a couple of them have some sort of conflict, good luck isolating that issue and resolving it. It can be done, I know - because I've done it on my Droid - but most *phone* users don't want to hassle with that - and that could eventually relegate Android to the uber-geek crowd. Whereas the tighter control over Apple apps helps to regulate against this - Apple's unwillingness to expose APIs that could cause these kind of issues, decreased performance, increased instability, diminishing battery life, ultimately results in higher customer satisfaction among iOS users. Customer Satisfaction surveys currently seem to bear this observation out. Android users are generally not as satisfied or loyal as iPhone users. A great example is that a large percentage of Verizon smart-phone users (the largest percentage of which can safely be assumed to be on Android platforms), say they would switch to a Verizon iPhone were it available. Do not shoot the messenger. I've got an Android, and I'm not really interested in getting an iPhone. Also, like all other statistics we see thrown around the tech industry (which I've argued the point on, before) - right now we see two different sets of numbers being thrown around - one that says Android market is growing and that Apple is stagnant or shrinking, another that says that APPLE is growing rapidly and dominates the market by a significant margin. Of course, Google believes the data that supports Android, and Apple promotes the data that supports iOS. Who you gonna believe?!? See Marthill's response below for the statistics that Apple is pushing, which paint a far less rosy picture for Android. I don't believe those, either. I'm seeing FAR more people with Android handsets now than I've ever seen, and would say that at this point I'm seeing people with Android handsets more often than Apple. I know that isn't exactly a scientific method of observation, so, FWIW... Personally, I don't know enough about how the data is being gathered. Are they counting all iOS devices? I bet they are. That isn't really fair as there aren't any Android tablets and only a couple lame Android PMPs out right now. Let that market start to grow or remove iPod Touch and iPad numbers from the statistics to get a clearer picture. In any case, in the WWDC Apple went out of their way to illustrate that Android trailed by TWO SPOTS behind the iPhone in a "what, me worry?" statement that made me wonder, "if Apple is so confident against Android, why are they worried about #4 while they completely dismiss #2 and #3? I think because Apple knows that Android *is* *the* threat to iOS. That is where they're going to compete, and there is a strong possibility that they may lose. They wouldn't address Android specifically, if Android was in the #4 spot while they hold #1, if that wasn't the case.

tommy higbee
tommy higbee

I keep seeing the statement offered that Android will be just like Windows just because it's more open. I don't see that at all. Windows has known design flaws that Android seems to be avoiding. For instance, Android is not going to have the Windows registry or file fragmentation. I think the sheer number of Android devices is going to recreate something very much like the PC clone marketplace of the past, but without any one company being able to control every device. Sure, Google could try the old Microsoft ploy, but I don't think they would be successful. Nokia and Intel have already teamed up on a competitor, Meego, that could probably replace Android quickly if Google got too heavy-handed.