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Only 45% of IT departments blocked the NCAA Tournament in 2008

During the start of the 2008 NCAA Basketball Tournament last week, TechRepublic asked if IT departments were doing anything to block the tournament on their networks and if their companies had official policies prohibiting users from watching at their desks. See the poll results.

Businesses and their IT departments often dread the opening round of the NCAA Basketball Tournament. The first two days -- always a Thursday and a Friday -- feature games that start at 12:00 PM Eastern, and the games are now broadcast over the Internet, which means millions of workers can watch from their desks. And that means productivity losses and bandwidth problems.

During the start of the 2008 NCAA Tournament last week, TechRepublic asked if IT departments were doing anything to block the tournament on their networks. We discovered that only 45% of respondents (see below) were using content filtering to block users from watching the basketball games on their office computers.

We also discovered that 54% of companies (see next graph below) had a policy prohibiting employees from watching the NCAA Tournament from their office computers.

And we found out that about half of the respondents had a March Madness bracket contest with an office pool to reward the winners.

As a follow-up, TechRepublic is running two additional polls:

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

2 comments
dogknees
dogknees

It's not really an IT issue. If a manager is happy for his/her staff to spend their time at work watching it, that's their perogative. If they aren't it's a HR or management issue. As a rule, it's not up to IT to enforce these things. However, we can assist them by providing usage reports and statisitcs. It's up to them to decide how to use the information.

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