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Our picks for the best apps on Android, iPhone, and iPad

Apps have taken center stage with the growing uptake of smartphones and tablets. That's why TechRepublic has created lists of the must-have apps on the various platforms.

Apps have taken center stage with the growing uptake of smartphones and tablets. In fact, the platforms with the best apps will likely be the ones that get to stick around and survive in this highly-competitive and crowded market place.

However, with the vast number of apps flooding the market, the hard thing is knowing which ones are the best to install. That can be especially difficult for new smartphone users. That's why TechRepublic has created a series of lists of the must-have apps apps on the various platforms.

Take a look at our lists and then chime in with your picks for the must-have apps on your platform of choice.

Top Android apps

Read the blog post. View the screenshot gallery.

Top Android widgets

Read the blog post. View the screenshot gallery.

Top iPhone apps

Read the blog post. View the screenshot gallery.

Top iPad apps

Read the blog post. View the screenshot gallery.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

16 comments
tward100
tward100

I am looking for an app developer to create an app for me. Can any one please let me know how I can find someone? Is there a web site for this? Is there a place on Tech Republic? Also, can anyone tell me what the average cost of an app is? Thanks T. Ward

printerguy
printerguy

Have you read about these apps sharing personal data. I quote from an article "The team of computer scientists from Intel Labs, Penn State, and Duke University chose 30 out of the 358 most popular Android apps that, when installed, ask for permission to get at location, camera and audio data. Using an extension to the Android operating system called TaintDroid, created by the team, they logged what the applications did. This revealed that 15 of the apps sent location information to advertisers but did not inform users that data was being shared. Some apps gathered and despatched location information even when an application was not running and some sent updates every 30 seconds. One application gathered data and sent it as soon as it was installed but before it was run for the first time. TaintDroid also found that seven of the apps shared unique identifiers, known as IMEI numbers, when sending data. Others despatched phone numbers or SIM card serial numbers" How safe are these apps ?

Steve Elmore
Steve Elmore

I thought you said the iPad was only good for Scrabble & reading You sure are talking about it a lot.

Nsaf
Nsaf

how about: SwiFTP, Network Keyboard, Network Mapper, AndFTP, Screen Off, Lithium Music Player, Terminal Emulator, WiFi File Explorer, and XiiaLive, Wunder Radio?..these are my favorites. I have about 30 Apps and 2 games on my Samsung Vibrant.

interpoI
interpoI

I see you have the TriCorder... This is a great App for any of the Trekkie's out there. It's actually neat what it can do and I love the sounds it has. Another great app is iheartradio. You can listen to 1000's of radio stations in hundreds of categories.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

you'll see that most of them are aimed at reading and multi-touch interaction (my expansion of the Scrabble concept).

dfields
dfields

Vacation column? A little slug in the lead stating that would have been a good thing, in case someone was looking for new suggestions.

tlfu
tlfu

For about $2 it turns your phone into a golf course mapping device that will display your current position and distance, relative to important points on the course, all superimposed on top of a satellite image of the hole. You can choose from hundreds of course that have already been mapped, or create your own maps pretty easily.

Coordi-Nator
Coordi-Nator

Omitting BlackBerry, the largest business platform seems odd.

dstante
dstante

I'm sorry but I have to agree that omitting blackberry is short sighted when it is still more widely used by business professionals. Users have blackberries, and while geeks will all own an iphone or android phone they still must "use" blackberries.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

BlackBerry is behind the game in general apps. There are tons of line-of-business apps for BlackBerry but most of those are only applicable to the people in niche industries that the apps serve. That said, BlackBerry is trying to change that. I'm actually at BlackBerry DEVCON 2010 today and RIM is making a series of announcements aimed at attracting more developers to BlackBerry. I'll have a story on this later this afternoon.

Pctx
Pctx

They are 5 years or more behind iOS and Android and just because the curves are still used by a large percentage of execs... They are moving onto the Android platform and not staying with Blackberry. Not even OS 6 will save them. I give them another 3-5 yrs and they will be the next Palm.

Pctx
Pctx

RIM even with their announcing the PlayBook yesterday do not have anything compelling for people to stick with the platform. I used to be a huge crackberry fan for almost 2 years and swore by them, but now, they simply are not worth the time or attention. I do agree with you though that the smart phone market has blurred the line of personal/professional to a point which I think is difficult for some end users to manage. However, anyone who caries around two phones now for work (some of my friends included) feel like a complete tool for having to have (usually) a crappier phone (read that as a blackberry) vs. an Android phone or iPhone. Now granted, security is a big deal on both platforms as you point out. Android gets rooted, iPhones get jailbroken and Blackberries... well, you can swap OS's on them whenever you want. The bigger picture is reduced training time, lower cost overhead and better end user experience of which Blackberry just cannot compete with now in this day and age.

johnmckay
johnmckay

I like Android, I like the iphone too but dont need or want my media on my phone so that aspect is of no use to me. Both are great for the internet, but the Android has a secure browser, can open zipped files, passworded email and password protected pdfs... BIG interest to me and corporate land. iphone in corporate land is often achieved by running a secure "app", resulting in password entry every time you use it, Android too. This in effect is like running a corporate profile plus your personal profile and is early days in my oppinion. For me it's a pain when I can do it so much easier on the blackberry with much less entering of a password unless I choose to lockit or it defaults on in 5 minutes. Not every time I choose to read email then look at another app. GRRRRRRrrrrrrrr RIM need to get a decent sized screen, and a deceent browser (their one is total pants) but I've been saying this for years. They NEED to get a grip NOW... while there's still time. And there is still time as the iphone is certainly not securee enough for corporate/private data and I doubt my Android is much better. Most reporters need to stop dreaming... iphone is NOT entering corporate land in it's raw state, so please stop perpetuating a lie and portraying a Nirvana that simply does not exist.

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