Windows Phone

Podcast: Is Windows Phone 7 Microsoft's last stand in mobile?

Windows Phone 7: We discuss the details, the possibilities, and the one factor that would have made it a lot more interesting.

Podcast

Microsoft has been rapidly losing ground in the smartphone market. Can the newly-announced Windows Phone 7 change that? We discuss the details, the possibilities, and the one factor that would have made it a lot more interesting.

The Big Question is a joint production from ZDNet and TechRepublic that I co-host with ZDNet Editor in Chief Larry Dignan.

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About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks.

26 comments
jfreedle2
jfreedle2

I would never have an iPhone or an Android based phone.

lynxha
lynxha

I don't think that Microsofts Phone with windows 7 will make much of an impact seeing as how I will never own a smartphone from Microsoft, I really have no need for a smart phone all I use is my 3G cell phone

dmack
dmack

You discount Symbian. Typical US ignorance. Symbian has 2x the units of RIM

pcassidy
pcassidy

Symbian is a large phone os but it is ran by lots of small candybar and flip style phones and is not even on any major smart phone that I know but then again I only care about the USA Market.

evanc
evanc

Most people seem to have forgotten what a smartphone originally was. Certainly not a phone with a touchscreen; the original smartphones had QWERTY or even just extended numerical keyboards. Smartphones are really just phones with decent extensibility (ie; the ability to load native code apps), decent PIM features, and multitasking. Interestingly iPhone fails on the last count, but the incredible number of apps available make it hard to deny as a smartphone. But I digress. Symbian would have to be one of the original smartphone OSes - heck, that's what it was designed to be! It has apps, PIM, and multitasking. And if you're looking for "modern" smartphones running Symbian, just look at the Eseries (business smartphones) and Nseries (personal smartphones) devices. Though you may need to look beyond what the US carriers can make their megabucks on to come across them.

SgtPappy
SgtPappy

Go suck yourself!

jkiernan
jkiernan

Rah rah. Go USA.

jkiernan
jkiernan

Jingoistic platitudes are ridiculous. That was the tongue-in-cheek intent of my post. Self-loathing is totally extraneous and not applicable here.

dcolbert
dcolbert

If you look at how often any story or article on any topic is used as a jumping off state about what a rotton, horrible, dispicable place the United States and her citizens have become. It is as tendy today as being sacreligious of Jesus was in the 80s. :) Hating America is Hip... patriotism is so 1980s...

TheKingOfKings
TheKingOfKings

That was beautifully said. How long have you been practicing that speech? Just Joking, was getting a bit to heavy in here.

dcolbert
dcolbert

Hmnnn... Nope. That isn't the URL in my address bar. Tech Republic is, clearly, mostly oriented toward the tech industry in the United States. It isn't about "Rah rah. Go USA" at all. It is that tech that is big in Europe isn't necessarily relevant in the US. Kind of like David Hasslehoff. Why do Europeans always come into boards filled with Americans and start talking about how the tech discussions do not address the European market? Better yet, why do they always try to leverage that into an excuse to talk about how "ignorant Americans" have a narrow world view? I understand the differences in tech in both Europe and Asia. It is academically intresting to me, but it is irrelevant to my situation, living as I do, in America. Tell me, do you find Americans going into European boards, maybe ZDNet.co.uk and doing the reverse? "This Nokia review totally discounts the American market! Stupid Europeans, why don't you ever address the American market in your stupid reviews of phones that are only relevant in Europe?!? Europeans have such a small-minded world view." The better question is, "If Europeans have it so good, why are they so bitter and petty about being left out of discussions about American tech"... heck... "why the USA envy, in general". Europeans need to get over their "We're as good as America" inferiority complex, I think. Anyone who spends THAT much time going, "We're as GOOD as that other guy... we're actually BETTER"... probably doesn't really believe it themselves. That is too bad. Poor little Europe. I don't mind hearing about the European point of view, or the Asian point of view, and actually welcome it, if you can be civil and not turn it into some sort of "Americans are the fattest, laziest, most ignorant, most over-indulged people in the world, and their tech sucks too, so nyah nyah nyah" kind of childish argument. Why are so many Europeans so challenged in actually being able to do that? It realy reflects poorly on the people in Europe. Although, my bad, it *appears* that both of these posts were made by self-loathing citizens of the United States. You can never discount that they might be from another nation but here on a work visa, though.

lpsebay
lpsebay

Do we really need another smartphone entry? Isn't WP7 just a Zune on steroids?

caesarv
caesarv

We all know that WM6.5 sucks in terms of application optimization and speed. I think this is what microsoft should look in to enhancing in windows phone 7, I don't think i would appreciate a fancy new OS that runs slower than the previous one and not optimized for fast performance and response time, just like the old wm6.5

felix1761
felix1761

Even if MS was to create a great phone it would not gain traction in the market. Gates and Co are not perceived as innovators they are the market 800 pound bear the leader because of their size. While they work at matching the iPhone or the Droid Apple and Google continue to leapfrog current techical expectations and redefine the market. And giving Google even that much credit in the mobile market is a reach. The Droid simply competes with the iPhone it does not leapfrog. I'm typing this now on a Droid and after two months with it I would get an iPhone if I were not married to Verizon because of a great corporate discount.

glenmy
glenmy

Felix, I also have Verizon, but I went with the Palm Pre Plus. It has only been available for a month, so it was probably not an option when you got your Droid. It is quite slick. You may want to check it out.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

Phone is awesome. It feels cheap and flimsy but it's awesome.

slobodan.hajdin
slobodan.hajdin

Wherever WM 7 is going, it's bye bye from me. I even don't like what MS has done with WM 6.5.x, so I'm staying with WM 6.1 on my HTC Blackstone. My next phone will most probably run Android platform...

eeastman1
eeastman1

While potentially convenient to have a smart phone, I find the locked in deals with specific carries a MAJOR financial disadvantage. I will be sticking with my wi-fi enabled PDA. It covers me 95% of the time that I do not have other means available. Don't cringe, it is an iPod touch that I purchased as a portable media player, but I have found its other uses as a PDA indispensable.

atoms
atoms

This is exactly what I do. As long as the locked in deals are the only option, I'll keep opting out.

w9geek
w9geek

I agree totally! I can't see replacing my PDA with the limitations combining it with a phone would require. WiFi locations are widely available, so the PDA does great. Sure, only available at a fixed location, but talking or texting while driving is killing enough people, now add browsing the Web???

scarpa2000
scarpa2000

Overall enjoyed what they discussed but would like to have seen actual phones and how they are supposed to work

rowdydave
rowdydave

...I don't see what everyone finds wrong with the Windows Mobile OS. I have used Windows Mobile phones since switching from the old Palm OS platform, and find it very useful and productive. As for ringtones, those are for kids, and I don't care how many finger presses it takes to change a ringtone. What I care about is getting my Calendar, Contacts, and E-mail on my device, and being able to easily interface with the MS Exchange server where I work. Windows Mobile has worked quite well for me on all these fronts, and has been a good all-around device. Sure, the iPhone is nice, but I like a hardware keyboard. To each his or her own.

TheKingOfKings
TheKingOfKings

Windows Mobile has been lacking compared to other Mobile Operating System from the start. Constant glitches, freezes and problems. The good thing was people had a good knowledge of Microsoft and were able to cook ROMs to fix or tweak problems. Windows Phone 7 is now (just as Windows 7 did) playing catchup to the inventors and innovators of the industry. The OS looks like a cross between the Samsung OS and the iphone OS. At this point, with all the other options out there, it's not going to work unless they do something amazing with it. The hardware on phones is quickly cathching up to the OS, if not already caught up. The OS just has to use it properly. As for those who are weary of the contracts and smart phone plan lock downs (And yes, I do understand that not everyone needs a supercomputer in their pockets), there is a simple out. Buy the phone at full price, find it discounted on ebay or get a used (refurbished one). I have not been locked down for many years now. I consider the early termination fee of a contract and add it to the price I would pay with the contract. That's what the phone is worth. Then add or remove features from ur plan (most companies let you change at will without contract renewals).

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

Yes, you heard me right. Up until now, all they were doing was recycling a PDA, PocketPC OS and tacking it on to a phone--stylus and all. The finger has replaced the stylus and users don't want to deal with document/file management on a phone. If a user can't find a document or change a ringtone from default to custom in less than 4 touches, then the phone misses the purpose. The Palm Pre Plus does this right, Droid and Windows Mobile 6.x doesn't. Microsoft is building a phone OS from scratch. So this is a game changer.

Economix
Economix

I believe the 7 is not progressive but rather catching up to the others - i.e. Android and the iPhone. The next breakthrough in smartphone technology will have to be bigger than what the MS Mobile 7 Series OS is offering so for now, it's just another option to purchase, doesn't do anything different or have that 'wow' factor that most people make purchases with. Eventually the smartphone market will turn into the PC or laptop market where all the units differ by small features, just personal preference or need, it even seems like we're almost there already. They will ALL be average with some offering more 'performance' at best. Right now it's just a HOT market so everyone is trying to strike the iron. I can't see the MS Mobile 7 being a real winner, it's just another unit. All the hype and good intentions of the Palm Pre with a shade more market share.

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