Emerging Tech

Poll: Does your company prohibit users from watching the NCAA Tournament at work?

Since the first round of the NCAA Tournament always occurs during the workday on Thursday and Friday, it can turn into a major productivity killer now that the games are streamed live on the Web. Thus, some companies prohibit users from watching the tournament at their desks. What's your company's policy? Take our poll.

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Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

14 comments
cwo
cwo

I own a tech business in NC. ANY employee who is caught (in the act of through logs) one time watching basketball on my time will be become a statistic on the next unemployment report. Period.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

Having once lived in Wilmington I'm glad to say I never worked for you. Are you big on micro management, too?! Hell even my server admin has it playing minimized in the background. We monitor the traffic and if it uses too much bandwiwdth we start blocking. While we block it network wide we do arrange for viewing in the conference room. It's never used during tourney time because we all enjoy the tourney.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

I came up with this idea at work and management approved. Then again most in management are hardcore ACC fans so everyone's happy, and I get to follow my team. NCAA basketball reigns supreme here, so no one really cares about any other tourny. Now if I can just come up with justification for a mini-bar...

angrykeyboarder
angrykeyboarder

Is it that big a deal?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If I can take a vacation day to watch the NASCAR qualifying races for Daytona (held on Thursday in February), a basketball fan can take a couple of afternoons to watch his / her team at home on his own time. If I can learn to use a DVR or VCR to record a rain-delayed race held over to a Monday, others can learn to time-shift their teams' games. I don't understand why anyone would come to work with the expectation of not working.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

NCAA is a big deal where I work. Alot of people like Nascar here as well, but they don't complain when I throw the tournament up in the conference room..assuming it's not booked. This is just something available to employees on break. Wath it if you want to or stay away, it is the individual's choice.

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

...that had similar policies. If a conference room isn't booked, people were welcomed to pop in and out, and check out a score, or eat their lunch in the room. Once people were there too long, or the room was needed for official business, HR came to give them the boot. Pools (which is really why most people care about the games) were forbidden, but the policy wasn't enforced.

debuggist
debuggist

Should anyone have the expectation to go home and not work? Yeah, some should and do, so they shouldn't be playing at work. But for those that put in extra hours outside normal business hours, watching a few minutes here and there once a year (in the case of NCAA basketball tournament) is an OK trade-off.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I don't expect anyone to go home and work. I certainly won't. I'll stay at the office as long as it takes to get the job done, but I'm not doing it at home on my time. I'm sure as hell not doing it on vacation, period. There's a difference between "a few minutes here and there" and streaming multiple games for hours at a time. I don't see why this tournament should be treated differently from any other sporting event. We don't allow our second shift workers to watch the Super Bowl. There are early rounds of golf tournaments scheduled almost every Thursday and Friday, and we have far more golfers where I work than basketball fans. I've never seen a request to stream The Masters in here, and we're only an hour from Augusta.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

We have a policy prohibiting non-work use of the Internet in general, and streaming of entertainment media specifically. The ban applies to all bandwidth hogs, not just the basketball tournament. Learn how to use a VCR or DVR, people.

2rs
2rs

ditto

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Take our poll: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=618 Does your company have a policy in place that prohibits users from watching March Madness from their desks? Do workers obey the policy?

Larry the Security Guy
Larry the Security Guy

Our company takes a novel approach and actually expects employees to work while at work. We get paid to be productive, not sit on our butts watching television.

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