Collaboration

Poll: Does your IT department support any Internet-delivered apps?

According to Gartner's CIO survey, the top three 2010 priorities for CIOs are virtualization, cloud computing, and Web 2.0. Is your IT department supporting any cloud apps? Take the poll.

According to Gartner's big CIO survey, the top three priorities for CIOs in 2010 are virtualization, cloud computing, and Web 2.0 -- a big shift from past years when things like IT/business alignment, dashboards, and staff retraining have been the dominant issues.

Since cloud computing and Web applications featured so prominently in the 2010 priorities and since we're over halfway through the year, TechRepublic would like to know how many IT departments are currently supporting cloud computing applications. By that, we mean apps that are delivered over the Internet (like Salesforce.com or Google Apps Premier or hosted Exchange), and not just internal apps that users access via a Web browser.

Answer the poll question and then jump in the discussion to tell us the kinds of apps that you think make the most sense over the Internet.

Take the poll

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

15 comments
jfreedle2
jfreedle2

I would NEVER trust web pages that are attempting to be applications. These are not "applications" in my mind and I would prefer real applications to be able to do my real work.

oldbaritone
oldbaritone

The majority of the applications we support are web-based. It's much easier for everyone using the browser-based model instead of the install model. Updates go on one system only, and every computer comes with a factory-installed client software. They're mostly centralized data applications, in one form or another.

tbmay
tbmay

....waiting to happen, but it's sexy so people will jump on it like white on rice. I, like most of you, will have to warm up to it or find another career.

taylorstan
taylorstan

You got to remember this is all based on being able to stay connected to the internet. Your ISP, the providers ISP and all the stuff in-between are subject to failure. All it takes is some idiot with a backhoe to brink it all crashing down. It's a gamble......where do you want to place the risk...on your network or on their's.

jill
jill

Majority of my support & training services since specialising in cloud based applications encompasses conversions, setups, training & presentations. The client has already made the decision to migrate from a desktop accounting environment. Therefore with this new & exciting trend, it has enabled my company to specialise in a few applications in accounting, payroll,time & job costing, project management, inventory control and workforce mobile applications, these all integrate to the accounting application. I find that my time is better utilised now, by being able to implement an accounting service, deliver support & training, rather than diognostics of user & hardware problems. This new space in consulting services has opened up an area where my client base are not just "around the corner" but have clients in various states & also global clients. The concept of paying for a monthly service enables the consultant to form an ongoing relationship and have access to their data immediately and thus solving a particular problem in "now time". This certainly is the way of the future and my travel time has been halved.

JustinfromHexawise
JustinfromHexawise

Software testing tools, including software test design tools like Hexawise, cloud-based performance testing solutions, and bug reporting tools, are being used by hundreds of Fortune 500 firms. Some such firms have extremely strict data privacy requirements and require private cloud solutions (with all data hosted locally). In our experience though, the vast majority of such corporate users though are OK with having the testing data saved in the cloud. Justin Hunter CEO of Hexawise - "More coverage. Fewer tests." www.hexawise.com

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Your offering these apps for use with you as the host, not with companies running them on their own servers and managed by their own people. Your post is about as close to the 'apam' line as possible without crossing it. Your only other post here WAS spam, a blatant reply saying 'Your quote is like one on our web site; check these links and see!"

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If so, yes.

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

I didn't think about Outlook Web Access when I voted. I suppose one of the problems with answering such a poll is how one defines an "Internet Delivered App". For instance, with one parts supplier I routinely do business with, they provide a service which could be considered an Internet Delivered App. i.e. A "Parts Finder" service. Where I answer questions that define the requirements for the item I am looking for, and they run scripts, etc on their end which offer up suitable choices. Its a much more complicated and involved process than simply being a search engine matching key words. But such a thing is not supported by our IT department. Nothing for them to support. Services like Google Apps is definitely not supported. I am sure they (our IT department) know about it. But company policy forbids the use of such services for company related material/work.

wolfshades
wolfshades

Totally forgot about OWA. And to respond to someone else's comment: even if you put corporate web apps in the cloud, you still have to support them. The only ones you shouldn't have to, are things like Google apps. That being said, I'm certain large corporation/government IT Security departments would still disagree, and want to have someone from their shop monitoring it all, in some fashion or another.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

Isn't the purpose of Internet-delivered apps to relieve IT departments of support? If we still have to support it, where's the savings? For the Internet apps that some of our users run, we make sure they have a support contract and an 800 number nearby. If we are involved we only deal with the vendor not the users because 9 times out of 10 we have no clue how to use the software or what it's for.

roda235
roda235

We support open Government and Information. When dealing with sensitive (HIPPA) material we have safeguards for our external (internet) consumers that need support. Expecting consumers to use applications delivered on the Internet without support seems somewhat irresponsible and unaccountable to me.