Linux

Poll: To what extent has Linux invaded your server room?


Since I just came back from LinuxWorld earlier this month, it was unavoidable for me to do a poll that involved Linux. It's clear to me that Linux is still making very minimal progress on the desktop, but it continues to make steady progress in the server room. How much of an impact has Linux made in your server room? Respond to the poll and join the discussion to tell us how you are using Linux in your server room.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

6 comments
jdclyde
jdclyde

We started out as a SCO Unix shop. When I got hired in to re-write our legacy systems (cobol) for the Y2K issue, I loaded a RedHat server to clone off the SCO box for programming and testing. A year later, we were the first to load a Domino server on Linux. New Intranet server, RedHat. New web server, RedHat. New backup server, RedHat. We have one W2K server to run Symantec Corporate AV. That will be replaced with a different AV that runs on a linux platform, by the end of next month. That will make us 100% linux/Unix again. We are in the process of updating servers, and are going to SuSE SLES10. This will also replace the SCO box. We had two servers with an uptime of over 350 days until the power went out over the weekend for a day and a half. :( Why move off of SCO? The company has been a joke ever since Caldera bought it up. Why not run our mail server off of windows? CodeRed and the like NEVER even showed up as a blip. Why not run our web/intranet servers off of windows? security and cost. Especially back in the day that MicroSoft was still catering to the lowest denominator in users with the "everything on" by default settings.

DanLM
DanLM

Where I work, there is a mixture of Linux, Windows, and Mac servers. This company has just been bought out for the 3rd time in a year with the new company spending a lot of money into new hardware(way overdue) in the server rooms and network structure. I believe the database servers will stay Linux(HP) with the main applications, networking, and mail being Microsoft. I think the file servers are going to be a mix between OS X and Microsoft. I work for a publishing company, so that is the reason for that mix(I think). Our main databases are Oracle, and I truly believe that putting Oracle(A pig by itself) on a Microsoft server would be a mistake. A resource strong database needs to operate on an OS that provides as much resources as possible. And I don't think MS gives you that option. I would prefer Unix as the file servers, but they are tieing everything together(active directory and exchange). And truthfully, I can see the benefits of doing this. It has to be better the Novel setup we currently have now. As many discussions as I have been in here about OS's, with the last one getting my mouth washed out with soap(I deserved that) by Beth. I think a good server room should have a mix of OS's. There are many purpose's for servers which MS and Linux both have strong points in specific area's. Larger shops you do need MS for specific task's with Linux being just as strong in other tasks which it should be used for. I've seen arguments go both ways about small shops about being OS specific, my preference being Unix. But that is for stronger minds and weaker bladders(you know what kind of contest that would be become). In my mind a good mix of OS's in your server room with the proper OS being assigned the proper task gives you better stability. Being of a single mind about an OS for all purpose's just weakens you in specific area's. This is why I don't get into a lot of these discussions to be truthfull. I see strong points in each OS and try to use the specific OS for that strong point. I also recognize weakness's in each OS, including security and knowledge base that each requires. If you don't have a strong knoledge base in the server room(no matter what OS), you are going to have security issues(No matter what OS). Dan [i]Edited to [/i] To remove me putting my name twice in the bloody post. I am going to make this a permanent [i]Edited to [/i], because I do it every post I do.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

1.) You said that you're still using Novell, are you running NetWare? eDirectory? Why don't you like it? 2.) Why would you prefer to run the file servers on Unix? Would you run Samba or NFS?

DanLM
DanLM

1). Novel Netware. My dislike of the current setup may be due to how it is set up. Everything requires you to login. Ie: Network, email, proxy(internet), some file servers. And I know the mac's are not tied into it yet. 2). I'm just a Unix fan Jason, but I do like the file system better then windows. I'm not trying to trash NTFS, just stating an opinion. I would use Samba as a domain controller and file shares. But I do not think it would be as convenient as active directory. And I can understand why they are going the way they are. I'm just a Unix fan with regard to most servers, I just think they are better work horse's. I hope that answered your questions Justin. Dan

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Take the poll: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=534 What are the predominant functions of the Linux servers in your organization? If you converted these to Linux from Windows or Unix, why did you make the switch?

LawrenceFine
LawrenceFine

We started out Novell, and then moved to Windows around 2000 with Win 2000 server. Everything runs on Windows now, including Oracle, IIS, Exchange 2007, SQL 2005, and VOIP. We tried some Linux for DNS and firewalls, and even inherited an Apache server. Never really saw the Linux need, and even had some issues with some of the Linux servers, so everything is now Windows 2003. I think in large part we have never had any Unix/Linux expertise on staff, and why staff another skill set if you don't need to. Also, as a previous poster stated, MS is integrating everything so much between AD, Exchange, SQL, and the web, Windows does everythin we need. You don't find that integration on the Linux side. Chuck