Smartphones

Poll: What is the best smartphone for the enterprise?

Mobile is the hottest sector of computing right now for both consumers and businesses. Which smartphone is best for the enterprise? Take our poll.

Mobile is the hottest sector of computing right now for both consumers and businesses. Which smartphone is best for the enterprise? Take our poll.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

24 comments
jasevv
jasevv

Why is it Nokia Symbian. Symbian OS isn't tied to Nokia. Its like you telling, htc android, samsung win me. Its not the right way. I suggest that you change it. It might cause people confusion. There are Symbian phones from Samsung, Sony Ericssion, Sharp, LG, Fujitsu. Oh c'mon, man !

cameronn
cameronn

I've got both. The Iphone is a great phone/Media player, but there's too much stuffing around to make it a workhorse machine.

wbrooksjr
wbrooksjr

Blackberry with BES is by far the easiest to setup. In addition, all major carriers carry Blackberries. My users would not be tied to one specific carrier and I can get them a Blackberry from whichever carrier is best suited for their region. iPhone - I'm locked with AT&T. Android - I'm locked with Verizon. Windows Mobile - horrible as phones with any carrier.

rickshep
rickshep

I still haven't found anything to beat my WM device. Office, any media (with TCPMP), Flash (with Opera), attachments, business card reader, Skype, MSN, any social networking stuff. I don't particularly like it, it's slow and clunky, but infinitely hackable and does everything.

peterbajan
peterbajan

The Enterprise is getting re-defined thanks to prosumers's pressure and preferences.

fonzireyes
fonzireyes

Having worked for two major cell companies (Ericsson and Nokia) and having tested close to 150 phones, the Blackberry is by far the most user friend and easiest to setup.

jfuller05
jfuller05

Ease of configuration, organization, great email setup, enterprise server, and plus, it's a nice looking phone. The other smartphones seem to cater more to the consumer, e.g. games, fun apps, music, just from what I know about them. I know the BB has apps for music, but it's primary function is for the enterprise.

cperry
cperry

It depends on too many factors. If your Enterprise has BlackBerry Enterprise Server, then BlackBerry is the best choice. If you need rock solid Exchange integration, then Windows Mobile is the best choice. If your company utilizes Google Premiere Apps, then Android would be a top choice. If your company relies on a specific app, then iPhone is the best option. For personal preference based on a lot of factors, I'd put Android and iPhone in a tie for most companies with BlackBerry edging them out if you have BES. That all being said, I personally use a Palm Pre for all of my business purposes and love it.

boweb
boweb

..My WinMo does anything I want it to do. Ones setup I don't have any problems. And the new devices are even faster. Its about customization, but thats the IT Support's task to create custom packages for there users. Out of the box is an other matter. But then again, it depends on your meets.

_merlyn_
_merlyn_

the BB phones may be easy to setup/connect to a BES, but trying to setup a BES and setting all the policies is a big pain. Plus the high cost of purchasing one. If you don't have the money don't put a BES in. I have an iPhone and love it. To bad AT&T kind of suck for the area that my employer is in. From what I have seen of the BB that we do have installed; they are really only good for phone calls and email, not much else. People in business need to do more then just that on the road. RIM is slowly playing catch-up with the that between the WM,iPhone, and Android.

marianne
marianne

I agree with the Blackberry for corporate use. They are easy to deploy have a great battery life and are reliable.

rbotha
rbotha

I support about +-30 phones. By far have less hassles with Nokia Symbian users. Mainly as a result of the stable PC Suite, syncing and using phone as modem is easy enough to trouble shoot over the phone when there is problems. Cant say the same for BlackBerry Im trying the Sony Ericsson Symbian soon, hoping to have even better luck.

jfreedle2
jfreedle2

The strength of Windows Mobile lies in the included components of Microsoft Office, namely, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote in addition to Outlook. Yes they are rather limited editors, but they have enough functionality to get the job done. I can also use my Windows Phone as a portable digital media player as it also has Windows Media Player included.

janstordahl
janstordahl

Why continue paying extra for Blackberry to get mail and GPS when Android gets all that for free. Not to mention the droid syncs perfectly between desktop and phone vs the Blackberry that works when it feels like and with extra steps. We have used Blackberry for 4 yrs and am happy to make the switch.

Albert Myles
Albert Myles

I am not even going to tak about BES - mostely because I have no experience with it. However, as a productivity tool, I feel the Blackberry is without peer. The trend in "smartphones" seems to be going towards pretty graphics and sliding pictures. I don't really need all that when I am conducting business. I feel that RIM understands how I do business. Ironically I give Android second place for its flexibility. While I love the iphone (My wife has one and I have an iPod touch) it is (in my opinion) horrible as a productivity tool.

geoff.seabrook
geoff.seabrook

I've used Microsoft mobile for two years. OK for business apps but very poor for making calls - which is what I buy a phone for. iPhone is for consumers. Blackberry is old technology - why would I want push email. I have half a dozen active email accounts and I want to access them one at a time using pop3. Android ticks all these boxes although I'll have to go back to my pc for reading attachments. Geoff

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

The cost of BES is a moot point since the "Express" version is free up to 75 users. My company is using it and all new company phones will be Blackberries although 90% of the C-levels are using iPhones which are the bane of my existence. All iPhone users absolutely believe that they have to install that bloated pos iTunes software.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Isn't that more a function of your carrier than your phone or its OS?

mcbinder
mcbinder

I have not yet received an attachment I can't read. You may need the right app. Oh, except flash files - can't do those yet. mcb

Chipv
Chipv

If you believe that, then you are behind the curve.Here are some key points that proove it can contend for enterprise. 1. Secure Email connections to Exchange 2. Remote Applications - I use Jaadu RDP 3. Quick Office - you can View, edit and create office Docs,xls,ppt and Adobe PDFs 4. You can push security to iPhone - To include remote wipe 5. For the real tech savvy, you can jailbreak and let your developers go wild and really add true business apps to the iPhone!

_merlyn_
_merlyn_

True, but it is limited from a security stand point. At my employeer (finanical institution), security is pretty much everything. The more security the better. Places with less then 75 employees probably are thinking about BB or a BES either; however, there is always the exception to the rule :)

spriefer
spriefer

Iphone reads all normal attachments as well. PDF, Excel word docx. NO problem

Chris_Muncy
Chris_Muncy

1. You still can't control security functionality of the iPhone as well as you can on a Blackberry. 2. I can restrict my users web access via my firewall and BES. 3. I can natively allow blackberry users access to internal networks from the interwebs.

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